Knicks Morning News (2017.11.05)

  • [NYPost] Kristaps Porzingis: ‘I believe’ I can be the NBA’s best
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 12:07:12 PM)

    Less than a week after Enes Kanter lobbied for Kristaps Porzingis to be in the MVP conversation, ex-Knicks center Tyson Chandler said Friday he believes the 7-foot-3 Latvian has a chance to be the game’s best player. The compliments are pouring in for Porzingis after he’s weaved the best scoring start to a season in…

  • [NYPost] Enes Kanter on Porzingis, problems in Turkey and dinner with Trump
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 11:19:41 AM)

    Knicks center Enes Kanter, acquired from the Thunder in the Carmelo Anthony trade, takes a shot at some Q&A with Post columnist Steve Serby. Q: Have you seen anyone like Kristaps Porzingis? A: I didn’t watch Dirk [Nowitzki] when he was in his age, but I would say maybe Dirk. But besides that, I really…

  • [NYPost] Why ‘Cheese’ isn’t smiling anymore for the Knicks
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 7:53:38 AM)

    Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek has managed to wipe the smile off the face of the man known as “Cheese.’’ Mindaugas Kuzminskas, the forgotten Lithuanian who became a fan favorite last season as a rookie, has been inactive for all eight games, donning a suit on the bench. Kuzminskas admits to being sad about his predicament…

  • [NYDN] Porzingis now believes in his ability to become NBA’s best
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 1:19:08 PM)

    Kristaps Porzingis at first sounded sheepish.

  • [NYDN] Porzingis says brother’s comments were ‘taken out of context’
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 6:54:00 AM)

    The Latvian stopped short of condemning the words of his brother and agent, Janis.

  • [NY Newsday] Kristaps Porzingis doing his part to bring buzz back to MSG
    (Sunday, November 05, 2017 12:46:06 AM)

    It is the most exciting six seconds to happen at Madison Square Garden in years.

  • [NY Newsday] Mike D’Antoni sees franchise in Kristaps Porzingis
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 9:23:01 PM)

  • [NY Newsday] Patrick Ewing finally gets his shot at coaching
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 6:48:50 PM)

    Patrick Ewing walked beneath the basket where he had scored a good chunk of his 24,915 career points. He folded his 7-foot frame behind a cloth-covered table and nodded at the several dozen reporters who were on hand for his first news conference as a head coach at Madison Square Garden.

  • [NY Newsday] Knicks on the clock to do something in busy early season
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 6:46:00 PM)

    It’s normally not that busy at the start of the season, but already one coach has been fired (Earl Watson) in Phoenix, two high-profile players could be moved at any time (Eric Bledsoe and Jahlil Okafor) and the Knicks are on the clock to do something.

  • [SNY Knicks] GEICO SportsNite: Porzingis on strong start to season
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 11:10:36 PM)

    Kristaps Porzingis and head coach Jeff Hornacek discuss the early season success for Porzingis as well as the team’s recent hot streak.

  • [SNY Knicks] Kuzminskas still waiting first minutes with Knicks this season
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 1:30:36 PM)

    Knicks SG Mindaugas Kuzminskas is still awaiting his turn in the team’s rotation this season.

  • [SNY Knicks] Beasley’s scoring outburst helped Knicks finish off Suns
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 11:30:03 AM)

    Michael Beasley made the most out of his 17 minutes last night against the Suns with a scoring outburst to help give the Knicks a solid lead late in the game.

  • [SNY Knicks] Porzingis hears MVP chants again after 37-point night in the Garden
    (Saturday, November 04, 2017 9:06:30 AM)

    Knicks star F Kristaps Porzingis had Madison Square Garden on its feet the entire night as he poured in 37 points in the 120-107 win over the Suns.

  • 55 replies on “Knicks Morning News (2017.11.05)”

    I suspect this early record is going to be fool’s gold like some of our other recent hot starts. Even if KP really has elevated to another level of existence, we’re still depending an awful lot on creaky old Jarett Jack, and unless TH2 starts shooting with a lot more consistency, there’s nobody to carry the team if KP is either out with a minor injury or being defended better than Phoenix was able to do. So I would guess we’re still lottery-bound, albeit not for the top of the lottery with Dallas, Chicago, and some others.

    Having said that, I think it’s in the best interests of the team to ride this for as long as we can this season, even if it costs us ping-pong balls. It’s good for KP’s development, good for Frank’s and Hardaway’s and (if we consider him a long-term piece, despite the roster’s overabundance of centers) Kanter’s to play in an environment with hope — not of winning a championship this year, or maybe even of making the playoffs, but simply the belief that you have a shot of winning on most nights when you’re not playing against an elite-of-the-elite team like the Rockets or Warriors. When you start every night assuming you’re going to lose, it wears on you and can lead to bad habits.

    If the team comes back to earth in a few weeks, then by all means look to unload KOQ, Lee, and anyone not named Kristaps, Frank, or (probably) Willy who has trade value around the league. But until then, ride this out and see what exactly we are.

    The lucky thing about the set-up of the team post-Melo is that if they’re still hanging around .500 late in the season, it will almost inherently have to be due to somebody that will be with the team long term or, in the case of Kanter, someone who they easily could keep long term if they so desired.

    By the way, with Butler, Melo and George all in the West now, has there ever been a more definitive “He’s going to make the All Star team” case for a homegrown Knick since Patrick Ewing than KP this season? He seems like a mortal lock. He could come crashing down to Earth and still make it easily.

    Lauri Markkanen has really impressed me. His defensive rebounding is definitely being buoyed to some degree by playing alongside Robin “I’ll just box out” Lopez, but his shooting is so good. He’s a better pure shooter than Porzingis. If they can get quality primary ball handler long term he’s going to be excellent.

    The real valuable things actual NBA player Steve Novak did in real NBA games didn’t count because he, uh, wasn’t a real NBA player.

    I mean, it’s not like he was a key piece of a 54 win team or anything.

    Steve Novak played for 9 teams over a 10 year career and posted a career TS% of .616. Yet he never cracked the 2000 minute barrier and only 3 times had more than 1000 minutes. In most seasons he played less than 300 minutes. This despite him being 6’10” and one of the best 3-pt shooters of his day in an era where 3-pt shooting is possibly the most valued skill of all.

    Any coach that didn’t play him for 30+ minutes a game with a TS% like that should have been fired! I mean, who cared that he couldn’t pass, rebound, dribble, defend, get to the line or score from inside the arc? How can anyone intelligent not play him with a TS% like that??

    People talk about gravity effects with Melo, but Novak actually had a gravity effect when he was with the Knicks. He was an elite offensive player, who, like Kanter, gave much of it back on the defensive end. He played for 10 years in the NBA on teams of varying quality, and often posted WS/48 above .100 and positive BPM. He was obviously an NBA quality player simply because he was one of the elite shooters of his period.

    Novak was good because everyone who was guarded by him suddenly thought they were Michael Jordan. A lot of dumb shots were taken against him.

    All things considered the Knicks can end up worse than everyone but Sacramento, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Dallas, and Chicago. The 6th pick could end up being Kevin Knox, and he’s a really good combo forward.

    Novak was the ultimate one trick pony. He was not an elite offensive player, he was an elite spot-up 3-point shooter who had no other offensive skill whatsoever. Sure, if you could hide him on D (like the Knicks did during the regular season) he was a valuable bench piece. But any decent team could figure out how to stay relatively close enough to cut his usage down to single digits and then take advantage of his complete lack of ability in every other aspect of the game. I mean, why would so many coaches simply refuse to use him pretty much at all? I mean, look at Kyle Korver, who is also very limited and actually has a lower career WS48 than Novak but still gets minutes everywhere he goes, even at age 37, while Novak is out of the league at age 34.

    “He was a valuable bench piece”

    So we agree that he was an NBA player then?

    I get that he was of limited use and matchup specific, but that doesn’t mean he’s not an NBA player, that means he’s merely a role player. The fact that NBA coaches couldn’t figure out how to use a guy who regularly shot 40+% from 3 really just speaks to their lack of imagination and acumen.

    @benchwarmerdan
    Last five games Knicks have a top five defensive rating when Kristaps is on the floor (100.2)

    26th when Kristaps is off the floor

    Silky, in a purely semantical sense, you’re right. Clearly he played in the NBA and by definition, that makes him an NBA player. But unlike Korver or Kanter, he had one specific skill and zero other NBA-level skills. That’s why he had a niche during the regular season with the Knicks, but was essentially worthless once they got to the playoffs, and why he couldn’t get off the bench for any team despite his “success” with the Knicks. He’s out of the league at age 34 and played less than 800 minutes combined in his last 4 years since being traded from the Knicks. I mean, has there ever been another 6’10” player who played 500+ NBA minutes and didn’t record a single dunk?

    It’s not enough to say that Novak was a bad defender. He was one of the most helpless 1 on 1 defenders I’ve ever seen. Whoever he was guarding would go at him and score every time.

    I loved him but he was almost unplayable.

    The fact that NBA coaches couldn’t figure out how to use a guy who regularly shot 40+% from 3 really just speaks to their lack of imagination and acumen.

    Right, it took the incredibly imaginative brilliance of Mike Woodson to figure out how to use him. How guy with such a high degree of acumen isn’t an all-time great head coach in the NBA is beyond me. I mean, he coached the Knicks to a 54 win season! How did we ever let him go? Bring him back!

    I’m not giving up on Dallas as a 30+ win team. Carlisle has been overachieving for too long to think that he’s suddenly lost it. It’s not like the Mavs have no talent.

    @13

    Mike Woodson accidentally found out the right way to play novak, yes. He had no idea what the fuck he was doing but he managed to optimally utilize Novak by sheer chance. The fact that other head coaches didn’t copy that usage speaks to the fact that most of them are bad, Woodson included.

    Also, the snark is totally unnecessary. Don’t make me bring Ron Baker into this.

    Our best pure shooter might be Kornet in Westchester… that guy can really stroke it!

    Zero minutes available for him, though, unless Noah retires and we trade Willy.

    Kyle Korver was much better than Novak. Korver was a decent defender. But Novak was a useful NBA player in his prime, despite his athletic limitations. I don’t know why that’s so hard for some people to grasp.

    But Novak was a useful NBA player in his prime, despite his athletic limitations. I don’t know why that’s so hard for some people to grasp.

    Those people include the coaches and GMs of every team Novak played for other than Mike Woodson, and all the GMs who could have had him for nothing and passed on him. But if you’d rather throw your lot in with Mike Woodson and the GM who traaded away this valuable piece for Bargnani, have at it.

    Also, the snark is totally unnecessary. Don’t make me bring Ron Baker into this.

    See, i think the entire conversation is unnecessary. I made the following point:

    There are limits to TS%. Steve Novak was fun and valuable as novelty, but at the end of the day, he was not really an NBA player even with his .600+ TS%. Kanter is obviously much more valuable than Novak, but his deficiencies are very real and very costly as you move up the playoff ladder. But yes, he is still young and from what I see he has a great attitude. He runs his ass off in transition, which is nice to see. He also lost lots of weight and that could help somewhat on D. But at some point, defense is not about hustle or practice or conditioning or coaching. It’s about anticipating and making quick reads. No one worked harder than Amare, but he just couldn’t keep up mentally. I see the same thing with Kanter.

    Which was a response to:

    On Kanter, I’m pretty convinced he’s a plus player no matter what. If he keeps this sort of ts% there’s no way in hell he gives up more on defense than he provides on offense, just by sheer calculations. The dudes who are taking shots against him wont be as efficient as he is on the other end.

    You rather snarkily seized on a purely semantical aspect of the point, rather than the substance, which was that just having a high TS% does not in and of itself make one an overall asset on the court, as Novak’s career has demonstrated, both in my mind and the minds of nearly every coach and GM in the league. I mean, why wouldn’t a team like the Spurs trade a second rounder for him? Couldn’t they have used a dead-eye 3-pt shooter off the bench over the last 4 years?

    Oh, and feel free to bring up Ron Baker all you want! All I ask is that you please do so in a way that doesn’t exaggerate my assessment of him.

    Those people include the coaches and GMs of every team Novak played for other than Mike Woodson, and all the GMs who could have had him for nothing and passed on him.

    Novak had a few things going for him-he was really tall, he could really shoot, and he didn’t try to do shit he couldn’t do. He played at a time when the league still hadn’t figured out that generally shooting lots of 3’s is good. His career is a lesson in how people who run NBA teams didn’t understand how to use a guy with a valuable skill-even the Knicks, who figured out how to use him effectively, didn’t understand what they had. That doesn’t mean they shouldn’t have traded Novak, or that giving him a 4 year deal was smart. He was about as unathletic as you can be an play in the NBA, and he was old enough with the Knicks that his very fringy athleticism was about to vanish, but the Knicks didn’t replace him with a better guy who could shoot 3s, they replace him with guys who couldn’t shoot and they predictably got worse.

    Kornet seems like Novak, but at the center position. He’s got extra height and length and can block more shots. He seems to be at least as bad an athlete as Novak but appears to be a willing passer like Novak and an overall smart player.

    It’s funny how bad Jack’s numbers are! He still worse than Sessions by most metrics. But I guess the narrative is that he’s been playing better, and the team is playing better… so whatever. It would be cool to have even a league-average point guard, though.

    Novak was extremely limited. If you took away the spot up 3 defensively, all that was left was a very subpar rebounder, play maker and defender. In the regular season or against certain matchups he added value because he’d get some open looks playing off others and score efficiently in limited usage. But in the playoffs or when the good defensive teams locked him down he was useless and a net negative. That’s why he never made it outside playing in D’Antoni’s system.

    There’s a lot of emphasis on spacing in the NBA, but you have to bring more to the table than just one trick and lot of negatives. The same will be true of McBuckets. He’s going to have to do more than shoot to stick. He seems way less limited than Novak, but he has to do more of it.

    Since when is playing 10 years in the NBA and being out of the league at age thirty freakin’ four evidence of “not being an NBA player?” Was he “not an NBA player” when he played 1600 minutes on a 54 win team? Obviously Novak was extremely limited, but there is no argument to be made that he didn’t have tangible value to an NBA team in his prime.

    The “well NBA GMs and coaches didn’t like him” argument is so well-debunked at this point it shouldn’t even be addressed. Is Hassan Whiteside bad because at some point in his career no team really wanted him? Pat Beverly? Robert Covington? NBA teams are run by humans, and the fact of the matter is they miss out on players who could help their teams all the time.

    The thing is that Novak was truly one of a kind. He was a 10 in pure shooting and a 0 or 1 literally everywhere else, there’s really not many players who even reach the NBA with this sort of major discrepancy in value. The best comparison would be a great passing PG who can’t do anything else, but even then generally those guys can at least defend some or get to the line.

    I still think Novak was a good player simply because when you reach the sort of excellency he achieved shooting while in his prime years with the Knicks, you’re a valuable player. It’s like I said with Kanter, yes, he gives a lot back, but this sort of efficient scoring and rebounding is simply not going to be replicated every night by his opponents, thus he is a net positive. Out of all players with ~200 minutes Kanter is 5th in the league in wp48, just behind Capela, Drummond, Steven Adams and DeAndre. That means on a nightly basis he’s simply going to produce more than his counterparts in 25 other teams in the league.

    Obviously Novak was not on Kanter’s level and thats why he was always in much more limited roles, but there’s still value in having one skill that’s so elite.

    The one thing that scares me a bit is that the team on/off splits with and without Kanter look really biased towards the Knicks playing better without him, but I’m fairly confident this is equal parts small sample size noise, him playing mostly against starters and O’Quinn playing super well too.

    He played at a time when the league still hadn’t figured out that generally shooting lots of 3’s is good.

    In 2013-14 there were 11 teams that took over 23 attempts a game, and that number increased every year after that. It’s simply not true that there weren’t ample teams that figured out the value of 6’10” guys taking lots of 3’s…maybe not to the D’Antoni level, but certainly enough for plenty of teams to be looking for high-volume 3-pt shooters off the bench. (Even before that, guys like Bullard and Scalabrine had significant roles on good teams.) And I doubt that Novak is any less athletic now than he was at age 28…really, how more unathletic could he get? In fact, it could be argued that he should be a BETTER player at age 30-32 than he was pre-Knicks after getting all that PT and experience on a winning team.

    He probably didn’t play because even winning coaches and GMs on winning teams that valued 3-pt shooting did not think he was worth playing (or giving up an asset for him) even though he continued to post .100+ WS48 and .600 TS%. Toronto took him as part of dumping the god-awful Bargnani contract, and tried using him. He had an 11-game stretch where he played significant minutes and shot predictably well, but they went 3-8. Then they benched him and they went on a 9-2 run. Then he went to 3 other winning teams…OKC, Utah and Milwaukee, and they couldn’t find a use for him either.

    Again, the larger point is that TS% is not in and of itself a measure of overall effectiveness.

    Since when is playing 10 years in the NBA and being out of the league at age thirty freakin’ four evidence of “not being an NBA player?”

    He was in the NBA for a long time. So he was obviously an NBA player. He just wasn’t a very good one no matter what his TS% or the models say. That’s why he couldn’t get on the court for most teams. Even Popovich didn’t play him much.

    It’s no accident he had his best seasons in D’Antoni’s system. D’Antoni is willing to trade off just about everything else for spacing. So Novak was free to shoot the lights out playing “exclusively” off others, earn a high TS%, and get a decent rating from models all while giving up as much or more on defense and rebounding that you typically want from PFs (not to mention being ridiculously easy to shut down totally). Certain players will always rate better under D’Antoni, but on teams stressing defense or more balance he’s wasn’t a rotation player.

    The “well NBA GMs and coaches didn’t like him” argument is so well-debunked at this point it shouldn’t even be addressed. Is Hassan Whiteside bad because at some point in his career no team really wanted him? Pat Beverly? Robert Covington? NBA teams are run by humans, and the fact of the matter is they miss out on players who could help their teams all the time.

    Right, but this happened AFTER Novak’s two “successful” seasons with the Knicks. Do you think there’s a team that wouldn’t sign/utilize Whiteside NOW? Ot Beverley? Or Covington?

    He was in the NBA for a long time. So he was obviously an NBA player. He just wasn’t a very good one no matter what his TS% says. That’s why he couldn’t get on the court for most teams. Even Popovich didn’t play him much.

    It’s no accident he had his best seasons in D’Antoni’s system. D’Antoni is willing to trade off just about everything else for spacing. So Novak was free to shoot the lights out playing off others, earn a high TS%, and get a decent rating from models all while giving up as much or more on defense and rebounding that you typically want from PFs (not to mention being ridiculously easy to shut down totally). Certain players will always rate better under D’Antoni, but on teams stressing defense and other things besides spacing, he’s wasn’t a rotation player.

    Which is essentially my point, although Woodson moved away from D’Antoni’s system somewhat. People are getting too caught up in the “NBA player” semantical argument.

    Novak was a useful role player on those particular Knick teams. He had a .675 eFG% one year! Novak and Chandler got those Knicks a lot of efficient points as minor players in the offense. It was a weird team but it worked okay for a while.

    The rest of his game was nonexistent and in the playoffs with shorter rotations he was not particularly useful, but a .675 eFG% is what it is. He did help that team win some games and I don’t believe he was a net negative in those seasons.

    People are getting too caught up in the “NBA player” semantical argument.

    I agree.

    One of the things that’s common in the US these days is that everyone sees the world in black or white terms. They are also so dug in with their own opinions, they block out the good points the other side is making or spin them away with biased thinking. So they can’t find balance and reality. There’s no doubt in my mind I’m guilty of that also, but I’m aware enough of it to at least fight it.

    I liked Novak. He was loads of fun for the Knicks and did some good things, but I think all the commonly used models don’t measure players especially well. Some of a player’s stats are dependent on role, teammates, system, etc… Not that I have a better model. I don’t. I’m better at finding problems than solutions. lol

    On another note, I was supposed to run the NYC marathon today, but dropped out because my back is sore and I didn’t want to be hobbling around on my first trip to Europe. Me and the wife are headed to Italy on Friday…Rome, Florence and Venice. Unfortunately it will mean missing 4 consecutive Knicks games for the first time since, idk, the Larry Demic era?

    @32

    Have a great trip! Rome and Florence are for sure two of the most amazing cities I ever visited, and I’ve been bouncing around for a while hahaha.

    I think JK47 brought up a nice point, the fact that those 4th, 5th options on offense were so efficient for the Knicks was valuable when the main scorers for the team brought volume but middle of the pack efficiency. It was a very weird formula but it worked quite well in a strange way.

    That was a very fun season, although it was bittersweet in so many ways. It started with unexpectedly losing Lin, and ended in watching Kidd disintegrate, JR throw a stupid elbow, Melo stuffed at the rim and Chandler getting b-slapped by Hibbert.

    Thanks, Bruno, of course I’ll be checking in on KB regularly when my wife’s not looking!

    @ Z-Man

    Florence was easily my favorite of the cities I visited in Italy. I liked that it was small enough that you could walk from one side of the city to another in a day.

    My daughter is doing her semester abroad there and is having the time of her life. I’m really looking forward to having her show us around!

    I think Novak was a really nice regular season role player, but as Strat pointed out, in the playoffs when teams were game planning for the Knicks he was too easy to shut down because he had nothing to his game aside from spot up shooting and his defense was a joke.

    Kanter is also a flawed player, but his ability to create his own offense out of the post and be a one man wrecking crew on the offensive glass make him a better player than Novak ever was. Kanter is unplayable against certain teams like GSW or HOU, but he absolutely has value against teams that play with 2 bigs. He was fine against both Dallas and SAS in the 2016 playoffs for example.

    @14

    Dallas blows. Maybe Carlisle can work his magic to get them to 30 wins, but I’d be surprised, especially since they seem to have no interest in playing Noel.

    You’ll be missed Z-Man! Take a rest though. I’m sure the wife will appreciate it 🙂

    On Novak and to a lesser extent Kanter. The NBA is a league of matchups. Novak was great if he had a certain type of defensive assignment. Someone not looking to score, maybe. Someone big and slow that he could take advantage of on the offensive end. Not a lot of PF’s in 2014 and before were used to guarding corner threes. D’Antoni and Woodson had that figured out. All he had to do on defense was get a body on someone on the defensive boards and Chandler, who was dominant, would pull it down.

    Most players in the league, outside of the top ten, have their kryptonite and need to sit periodically. Bill Hanzlik used to give Bernard King fits. Novak clearly had his weaknesses and they became his undoing, but there’s no doubt that the classic Linsanity lineup was Chandler, Lin, Novak, Shumpert, and Jeffries or Fields (not Melo/ not Stat) with Lin / Chandler pick and roll and Steve in the corner. That was some of the best Knick basketball of the millennium.

    Me and the wife are headed to Italy on Friday…Rome, Florence and Venice. Unfortunately it will mean missing 4 consecutive Knicks games for the first time since, idk, the Larry Demic era?

    Have fun! Not having access to this site (and the internet in general) drove me nuts on my otherwise awesomw Alaska cruise, so I understand the feeling! 🙂

    On Novak and to a lesser extent Kanter. The NBA is a league of matchups.

    I’ll be curious to see if Hornacek starts Kanter — and/or plays him much — when it’s time for the Knicks to play Golden State. (Though he did start and played 25 minutes against Houston, which is another terrible matchup for him.) Then again, if we’re not starting him, what lineup do we roll with instead? O’Quinn at center? KP there, even though he hates doing it and we don’t really have a good smallball 4 at the moment?

    I’d like it if Hornacek was willing to be flexible with lineups depending on the opponent, but constructing a team where the majority of players are best suited to play center or shooting guard makes it difficult to mix-and-match.

    interesting to find out the kuz situation is not health related…

    both Willy and Kuz – not part of immediate knick plans…

    send them to westchester just to keep them in game shape?

    so, beasley over kuz…i don’t agree…

    Italy is so dope. Enjoy Z-man. I’d love to cruise Alaska, its like a reverse Caribbean cruise?

    Also the Cleveland Cavs look like they legit might suck at basketball. To all those Kevin Love guys on this site….what’s the deal with him?

    Teams should probably stop thinking Derrick Rose is the answer to their point guard predicament

    The Cavs have every shitty Knick guard of the decade on their roster except the ones that are on the current Knick roster

    I’ll be curious to see if Hornacek starts Kanter — and/or plays him much — when it’s time for the Knicks to play Golden State.

    You play Kanter and hope his post dominance and offensive rebounding makeup for his slow footed-ness on D.

    TBH I’m not really worried about us beating GS. It’s one game and we lose 99/100 regardless of who we have out there.

    Danilo Gallinari injured already. Its truly amazing how some people just constantly get hurt.

    Danilo Gallinari injured already. Its truly amazing how some people just constantly get hurt.

    I love Gallo, but he does attack rather recklessly for a 6’10” player.

    Not a problem for a fellow KB guy (divergent opinions on Ron Baker and Ntilikina notwithstanding XD)!

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