Knicks Morning News (2016.01.19)

  • [New York Post] Phil Jackson gets cryptic in his tribute to Glenn Frey (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 01:38:33 -0500)

    Apparently running the Knicks is a much more noble task than we all realized. While paying tribute to the late Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey, Knicks team president Phil Jackson slipped in an interesting phrase. Jackson, a noted Deadhead, tweeted, “Glenn Frey oh, how sad. He was one of the reasons I’m here in NY doing…

  • [New York Daily News] Knicks saved by Carmelo three-pointer, beat 76ers in 2OT (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 05:56:19 GMT)

    Thanks to a gritty 49 minutes from a hobbled Carmelo Anthony, the Knicks avoided what would’ve been their worst loss of the season.

  • [New York Daily News] Kristaps Porzingis helps Carmelo Anthony and Knicks as decoy (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 05:01:18 GMT)

    Against doctor’s orders, Kristaps Porzingis served as the NBA’s tallest decoy on the Knicks’ most important possession of the afternoon.

  • [New York Times] Redick’s Career-High 40 Help Clippers Beat Rockets in OT (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 07:51:54 GMT)

    J.J. Redick was getting tired of the Los Angeles Clippers losing to the Houston Rockets, so he finally took matters into his own sharp-shooting hands — with plenty of help from Chris Paul, of course.

  • [New York Times] Redick Shines From Downtown as Clippers Ground Rockets (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 07:36:30 GMT)

    Guard J.J. Redick set a franchise record with nine three-pointers and scored a career-high 40 points as the Los Angeles Clippers held on for a 140-132 overtime victory over the Houston Rockets at Staples Center on Monday.

  • [New York Times] Warriors Rout Cavaliers in Finals Rematch (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 05:39:28 GMT)

    Stephen Curry scored 35 points, including seven three-pointers, in just three quarters as Golden State pounded the Cavaliers 132-98 in Cleveland on Monday in an NBA Finals rematch.

  • [New York Times] Raptors 112, Nets 100: With Late Surge, Raptors Defeat Nets for Fifth Straight Victory (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 05:32:22 GMT)

    The Nets lost their third in a row, a game in which there were eight lead changes and 11 ties.

  • [New York Times] Golden Statement: Curry, Warriors Demolish Cavaliers 132-98 (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 05:07:04 GMT)

    Stephen Curry didn’t smell champagne. Blood was in the air.

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Olympics: U.S. Basketball Finalists Set (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 05:01:19 GMT)

    LeBron James was among 30 players selected as finalists for the United States Olympic basketball team.

  • [New York Times] N.B.A. Roundup: Warriors’ Cleveland Mementos: A Trophy, and Now a 34-Point Rout of the Cavaliers (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 05:01:05 GMT)

    Stephen Curry scored 35 points as Golden State coasted to a 132-98 victory at Quicken Loans Arena, where the Warriors clinched the N.B.A. title last season.

  • [New York Times] Nowitzki, Williams Lead Mavericks Past Celtics 118-113 in OT (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 04:49:07 GMT)

    Dirk Nowitzki scored 31 points, Deron Williams had 10 of his 20 points in overtime and the Dallas Mavericks beat the Boston Celtics 118-113 on Monday night.

  • [New York Times] Lowry, DeRozan Lead Raptors Over Nets 112-100 (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 03:15:36 GMT)

    Kyle Lowry scored 13 of his 31 points in the fourth quarter, DeMar DeRozan scored 30 points and the Toronto Raptors beat the Brooklyn Nets 112-100 on Monday night to match a season high with their fifth straight win.

  • [New York Times] On Pro Basketball: The Knicks’ Kristaps Porzingis Is a Precious Import. Handle With Care. (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 02:10:02 GMT)

    As the Knicks try to balance Porzingis’s health and their long-shot playoff bid, they should realize that prudence is the best course of action.

  • [New York Times] Knicks 119, 76ers 113, Two overtimes: Carmelo Anthony Returns to Help Knicks Ward Off 76ers (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 01:25:42 GMT)

    Anthony, who had missed two games with a sprained right ankle, scored 19 points for the Knicks, including a tying 3-pointer with 3.4 seconds left in regulation.

  • [New York Times] Horford, Millsap Pace Hawks to Easy Win Over Magic (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 00:28:09 GMT)

    Al Horford scored 15 points, Paul Millsap had 13 points and 12 rebounds and the Atlanta Hawks won their second straight game with a 98-81 victory over the Orlando Magic on Monday night.

  • [New York Times] Pistons Lose Cool, Bulls Take Advantage in 111-101 Win (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 00:00:55 GMT)

    Chicago coach Fred Hoiberg dismissed the idea that the Bulls might be better off without Joakim Noah.

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    Mike Kurylo

    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    69 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2016.01.19)”

    1. We blew an 18 point lead to the worst team in the NBA yesterday, but didn’t come close to the biggest stinker of a performance. Man that CLE-GSW game was a total disaster for Cleveland.

      I know the WP crowd loves/loved Kevin Love, but man…. he is a terrible defensive basketball player. Yesterday’s game wasn’t remotely all his fault, and I think that vine that is going around makes it look worse than it was (I think he was half-heartedly trying to close out on Steph), but I don’t know that he can be on the floor more than 10-15 minutes against GS. Honestly if I’m Blatt, I bring him off the bench so he can attack GS’s second unit on offense.

      Back to our disaster yesterday, which thankfully ended in a W — and sorry if I’m repeating as I didn’t get a chance to go through the whole game thread — WTF is up with Fisher?!?! in what world does Sasha Vujacic get the same number of minutes as a genuinely possibly useful 1st round pick (Grant)? And I thought we were done with the all-bench lineups?!?!?!

      And boy am I nervous about KP’s foot. Sounds not serious but big men and feet…scary.

    2. Grant is father of a newborn and they were playing an early afternoon game. Wouldn’t stun me if Jerian is exhausted now and Fisher saw that. Still, I’d rather go with a three guard rotation (especially since Lance can guard twos) then put Sasha on the court in non-garbage situations.

    3. Re: KP – unless he is literally 100%, I don’t put him back on the floor on wednesday. I don’t think you can be careful enough with this guy when it comes to lower leg/foot injuries.

      Although watching him vs Rudy Gobert will be like watching two pterodactyls going after it.

    4. I had a weird thought: Since the PG pool is so shallow, what if we didn’t go after a better PG, but somehow landed a good young 2, like Bazemore? A Gallo/Bazemore/Melo/KP/RoLo lineup ain’t too shabby.

    5. @2…..because nobody understands family issues like coach Fisher!

      @3….Rudy Gobert may be a dinosaur, but KP surely is not.

    6. ISHtar: The Sequel…long and frustrating

      The birth of Jerian’s baby went a lot better than the birthing of his pro career.

    7. I heard from someone who works at Sports Illustrated that this week’s issue will have a feature on our beloved KP. Can’t wait to read it, but I really hope he’s not on the cover!

    8. I continue to be impressed with Afflalo’s efficiency down the stretch. Full disclosure: I haven’t looked at his late game numbers and perhaps my own bias is working against me. I just have a lot of confidence when we go to him in the post or when the balls finds (on those times when Melo moves it).

    9. I know the WP crowd loves/loved Kevin Love, but man…. he is a terrible defensive basketball player. Yesterday’s game wasn’t remotely all his fault, and I think that vine that is going around makes it look worse than it was (I think he was half-heartedly trying to close out on Steph)

      There is always a vine going around about him. This one was particularly egregious:

      http://www.sbnation.com/lookit/2016/1/8/10739676/kevin-love-forgets-how-to-play-defense-while-guarding-andrew-wiggins

      He is flat out Bargnani-esque on one end of the court. I hope for his sake he gets moved to a team that can cover for his weakness and at least let him shine on the end of the court where he is amazing. I always enjoyed him on the Wolves, even just looking at his box score. But Love on Cleveland is depressing.

    10. He is flat out Bargnani-esque on one end of the court.

      My apologies. This is unfair to his rebounding dominance. The statement was just limited to his help defense and rim protection.

    11. “There is always a vine going around about him. This one was particularly egregious:”
      The “help defense” by the rest of the Cavs is also pretty impressive in this vine…

    12. Bunch of good games in the association yesterday: 6 over-times! (Counterbalanced by one epic blowout)

    13. Be nice if Afflalo would throw a pass out of the post every now and then, but it is impressive how effective he is.

    14. This is a tough stretch of games and it might be hard to find wins if we have to play without Melo or Porzingis:

      Utah, LAC, at Charlotte, OKC, at Toronto

      Hope Melo has recovered from 49 minutes and KP is 100% soon.

    15. I’ve read in several articles that there was no x-ray taken on KP’s foot. How is that possible — gotta do a precautionary x-ray…

    16. Every now and again I look on B-R’s season finder to see how unicorn-ish KP is. He is still the Unicorn.

      The only player in NBA history to average (per-36) 17 points, 10 rebounds, 2 blocks, and 1 made 3P

      http://bkref.com/tiny/NcAUv

      JUST. BE. HEALTHY.

    17. http://bkref.com/tiny/fnZKm

      The 2 blk 1 3pter really is a small club. Doing that we get Raaf LaFrentz, Brad Lohaus, Serge Ibaka last season, Josh Smith this season, Kristaps and Eddie Griffin, who did it 3x. Only Griffin was over 10 reb , and that was 1x. Only LaFrentz and Ibaka were over 15 pts/36. On the other hand Lohaus, Ibaka and LaFrentz all shot the 3 between .370 and .399. Kristaps is @.333 which is Eddie Griffin’s par. Good old Josh Smith brings up the rear at .310.

    18. Interesting tidbit in Harvey Araton’s article today:

      Playing in Spain last season, Porzingis appeared in 50 games, averaging about 21 minutes for a grand total of 1,072. Already this season he has rung up 1,210 minutes, with 39 games still to go, many perhaps to fall into that must-have category as the fans and the news media take the team’s daily temperature.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/19/sports/basketball/knicks-kristaps-porzingis-precious-import-handle-with-care.html?WT.mc_id=2016-JANUARY-OUTBRAIN_AUD_DEV-0101-0131&WT.mc_ev=click&ad-keywords=AUDDEVREMARK&_r=0

      Yikes. I did not realize how limited his playing time was in Spain.

    19. Of course we hope they took an x-ray — not taking an x-ray in that situation just indicates we have a careless training staff…

    20. Yeah I thought of that after the edit window closed. :/

      It wasn’t like it was in my thought process, either. I seem to recall pre- or early season the consensus thought here was to bring him off the bench and play him 15-20 minutes. Obviously about five minutes or five games in we all had euphoric amnesia.

    21. Every now and again I look on B-R’s season finder to see how unicorn-ish KP is. He is still the Unicorn.

      The only player in NBA history to average (per-36) 17 points, 10 rebounds, 2 blocks, and 1 made 3P

      http://bkref.com/tiny/NcAUv

      JUST. BE. HEALTHY.

      It’s interesting because Porzingis’s rookie season is a close reflection of two other prominent 7’3″ players that people initially put some expectation on him to become: Arvydas Sabonis and Ralph Sampson. Obviously the eras don’t quite line up and there is a ten year spread within their respective ages, but their rookie seasons look like this: http://bkref.com/tiny/VbpEY

      Sampson blocked as many shots, rebounded more, and scored more (at higher efficiency) during his rookie year, and he was primed to be a generational talent before injuries (I think that if the game in 1983 was played the same way, by the way, that Sampson, too, would have averaged at least one 3 pointer per game).

      And Sabonis battled injury to be, arguably, the most complete player of his generation.

      So, maybe not a unicorn, but, yeah, Porzingis could be something special (and, yeah, he’s gotta stay healthy).

    22. As i understand it, KP’s playing time in Spain was actually higher than expected due to the team being a bit dysfunctional, which also resulted in a bit of an odd usage of KP for a kid. Hopefully those same factors which deflated his stock, a little bit anyway, deflated Willy Hernangomez’ stock as well, that way we can have a steal on our hands.

      Also, any of yall hear about Willy’s little brother? Apparently he’s actually the more talented of the two: http://www.draftexpress.com/article/NBA-Draft-Prospect-of-the-Week-Juan-Hernangomez-5350 .

      DX has him as the last pick in the 1st round, but Jonathan Givony indicated on twitter (along with some other scouts) that he could go higher. If Phil can promise the kid to pick him, convince the kid to not workout at all, and pull a Rubio (“If I’m not drafted by the knicks, I’m staying here for a looong contract that whoever picks me has to wait out” ….which didn’t work for Rubio as MIN picked him anyway)…..the maybe Phil would have a situation where he considers trading someone for a late 1st and can get him. lol.

    23. PF Kristaps Porzingis is questionable with a sore right foot for the Knicks’ game vs. the Jazz on Wednesday. Porzingis described the injury as “like a bone bruise.”

      from espn.com

    24. DX has him as the last pick in the 1st round, but Jonathan Givony indicated on twitter (along with some other scouts) that he could go higher. If Phil can promise the kid to pick him, convince the kid to not workout at all, and pull a Rubio (“If I’m not drafted by the knicks, I’m staying here for a looong contract that whoever picks me has to wait out” ….which didn’t work for Rubio as MIN picked him anyway)…..the maybe Phil would have a situation where he considers trading someone for a late 1st and can get him. lol.

      That’s never really worked for anyone except John Elway and Eli Manning. It surely won’t work for a late first round pick.

      Remember when Steve Francis pouted his way to the stage because Vancouver?

    25. It’s interesting because Porzingis’s rookie season is a close reflection of two other prominent 7’3? players that people initially put some expectation on him to become: Arvydas Sabonis and Ralph Sampson. Obviously the eras don’t quite line up and there is a ten year spread within their respective ages, but their rookie seasons look like this: http://bkref.com/tiny/VbpEY

      Interesting comparison, but imagine what the Unicorn’s “rookie ” year looked like @23 a la Sampson or @31 a la Sabonis’s rookie year?

      That is what makes a Unicorn a Unicorn :-)

    26. What makes a creature a unicorn is that it has a big horn sticking out of its forehead.

      Well, unless it’s a narwhal. But you know what I mean.

    27. PF Kristaps Porzingis is questionable with a sore right foot for the Knicks’ game vs. the Jazz on Wednesday. Porzingis described the injury as “like a bone bruise.”

      from espn.com

      Hopefully it is just “like a bone bruise” in the sense that it just hurts like a bone bruise, because an actual bone bruise in the foot of a guy of Porzingis’ height would be very bad news (not “broken foot” bad news, but sadly pretty close – bone bruises are essentially early stages of a broken bone – rest can typically avoid the break becoming complete, but it is still not good).

    28. Interesting comparison, but imagine what the Unicorn’s “rookie ” year looked like @23 a la Sampson or @31 a la Sabonis’s rookie year?

      Age is both a blessing and a curse when dealing with 7’3′ guys. Sabonis had already ruptured his Achilles by the age of 21, had multiple surgeries, and by 25 had developed chronic knee, ankle, and groin injuries. (He was on the Soviet national team at the age of 15, btw). Despite all of this, Sabonis played through his injuries and put himself on a very short list for being the very best basketball player of the 20th Century. So, sure, imagine what Porzingis’s rookie year could look like at 23 or 31 years old? There’s a bettor’s chance that he could be under the knife by 23, and out of the league by 31 like pretty much every other 7’3″ player to have ever played in the NBA (Sabonis, Smits, Ilgauskas, Eaton, and Bradley are the only 7’3″ guys to have every played meaningful minutes in their 30s).

      So the horn in the middle of the unicorn’s forehead isn’t 3 point shooting, or reb%. It is durability, and the ability to be really really tall without any chronic injury.

    29. Guys, please stop with all the negative waves about KP!

      Negative waves? He’s being compared favorably to Arvydas Sabonis. That’s about the highest praise the guy can get, right?

    30. Bit off topic, but thought this was interesting. A reddit user has created pictures of the most used words by Knicks fans in 2015.

      http://imgur.com/a/SLOWy

      Interesting to note the word ‘fuck’ was used more than ‘playoffs’, which is probably a pretty good indication of how our 2015 was (or at least the first half of it was).

    31. Negative waves? He’s being compared favorably to Arvydas Sabonis. That’s about the highest praise the guy can get, right?

      I think he was more referring to his health. As in don’t jinx his longterm health with negative vibes about his longterm health.

    32. With all the talk about KP needing to add weight, could that actually make him more injury prone?? With him being so tall could the added weight not be good for his body or would it actually help him??

      I have no idea, just speculating since as mentioned above the injury history for guys that tall isnt great.

    33. the thing with really tall guys and lower leg injuries is the weight… that and basketball had a lot to do with it i’m sure… but yao, sabonis, smits and ming were lumbering 7ft 2+ guys… porzingis is ok right now weight wise but that’s the danger of getting up to like 250+ or so… he’s a lot more limber than them so he’s also good in that regard….

      i seriously hope he takes a few games off… and i hope the knicks are well aware of how catastrophic a porzingis foot injury would be…

    34. Porzingis practiced today. He’s still listed as questionable and said he still felt some discomfort but that it was much better than yesterday. He also called it a “bone bruise” and said it would be up to the medical staff to make the call on whether it was wise for him to play tomorrow night.

    35. I’m as nervous as the next guy about KP, but truth is — the Knicks are, for the most part, taken care of by docs from the Hospital for Special Surgery — probably the best orthopedic hospital in the country. Any trainer or doctor anywhere near the Knicks knows that KP is the Golden Child and that they absolutely cannot be wrong (or at least not cautious enough) about a foot injury in a 7+ footer. So the fact that they’re not worried — I hope — means that it really is nothing serious.

    36. Also sounds from the news stories that the pain is in his instep — so at least it’s not Jones Fracture territory which as i understand it is on outside of the foot. It is sort of the area of a navicular fracture, though — the thing that has taken Embiid out for 2 seasons. Presumably they have examined him for that.

    37. @37 That is so disconcerting.

      I wonder what PJ thinks. All Jackson’s joints have been replaced 5 times. He can be operated like a Rock ’em Sock ’em robot by any clever kid with a joystick. Reclining drowsily in Montana, Offenbach’s Tales of Hoffman playing in the background, he drifts off, troubled by the competing pressures to milk Porzingis’ franchise-saving powers or protect the young muse’s career and long-term health. Pondering his choice to let his star shine as soon and as brightly as possible, his consciousness furtively seeks quietude as it tries to nestle Hawkinglike in the remnants of nerve and sinew strapped to the scaffolding of his myriad prostheses. Visions arise of Kristaps disguised as Olympia the beguiling atomaton, dancing with transfixing grace only to wind down and require resuscitation over and over. Finally Dolan as Copellius arrives and, laughing, tears Antonia apart and steals Jackson’s reflection. Phil wakes up suddenly. He starts to get up, but realizes it’s too painful. What does he do then?

    38. on Another note:

      Miami with another L against the Bucks. They are just a bad match up for some teams plus Miami are down 2 pgs.

      I have been watching Indy lately and Turner is looking good. The ability of these young bigs are amazing. The pre-draft work out of Porzingis and Turner must have been amazing. Also, Jordan picking Frank over Turner looks silly.

    39. W ith all the talk about KP needing to add weight, could that actually make him more injury prone?? With him being so tall could the added weight not be good for his body or would it actually help him??

      It’s an interesting question. It seems logical that weight would be a factor for tall people, as it is for regularly sized people too, only exponentially more so. As mentioned above, Kareem played forever, but at 7’2″ 225 lbs, he was skinny and never bulked up. On the other hand, Ralph Sampson, also mentioned above, was skinnier 7’4″ 228 lbs, but he endured 3 knee surgeries that prematurely ended what was supposed to have been a career that “revolutionized te game”. (“Not only is Ralph going to be the player of the year, he’s going to be the player of the century,” an opposing coach said).

    40. Also sounds from the news stories that the pain is in his instep — so at least it’s not Jones Fracture territory which as i understand it is on outside of the foot. It is sort of the area of a navicular fracture, though — the thing that has taken Embiid out for 2 seasons. Presumably they have examined him for that.

      I don’t like them throwing the term “bone bruise” around. It better not be a bone bruise. A bone bruise in your foot is not good news for anyone, but especially not for a guy as big as Porzingis. But so far, the term has been sort of tossed out there as it being similar to and the fact that he’s practicing is good news (“bone bruise,” by the way, is such a terrible way to describe the actual injury – it makes it sound like not a big deal).

    41. About KP’s injury. All I have to say is look what Popovic does with his stars. He rests them. Yeah, they’re fantastic and can afford to lose a game or two to keep the team healthy. But maybe they’re fantastic because of the things Pop does?

    42. well with really tall ppl… like over 7ft 2… there’s not many of them in the world… we just have visible use cases in the nba… and being a nba player and that tall is even rarer…

      the cause for all the foot problems for tall centers could be a million things.. but i do know nothing is lost by being overly cautious…

    43. Stop worrying. Anyone can get hurt at any height at any time. Porzingis’ height does not, in and of itself, make him injury prone.

    44. Myles Turner fell way too far. His college numbers were outstanding and he clearly had a lot of room to grow physically. But it was a sort of a lackluster debut until his last game. Definitely a guy you should own in any fantasy league. Guys who can block shots and hit free throws don’t come around too often. Although this year, with Towns, Porzingis, and Turner that statement feels a little less true….

      I am sure everyone who passed on Porzingis thought about the injury issue. I’d be interested to know what kind of thinking the Sixers did on that end. And how they feel about that decision right now.

    45. If you want to worry about Porzingis getting injured I’d look at how often he throws his body around and into people/things before looking at how tall he is. You know, like the play he just got injured on.

    46. I’m not so much worried about Porzingis’ future health than I am worried about this particular injury. This whole “like a bone bruise” thing is freaking me out. Just tell us what it is, already!

    47. If the team doctors decided that it didn’t need to be x-rayed or MRIed, that’s good enough for me. Zinger is not a doctor, so his using the term “bone bruise” is almost certainly a mistake. The team has proactively addressed lots of stuff already (KP’s hip, knee, finger, Melo’s ankle) so I doubt that they’re being negligent here. Doesn’t seem to make sense that they would endanger their future franchise player by letting him practice with a potentially serious injury.

    48. Stop worrying. Anyone can get hurt at any height at any time. Porzingis’ height does not, in and of itself, make him injury prone.

      I don’t think this is actually true — ie. yes you are more prone to injury if you’re tall. Whether it’s because the forces on your leg/foot bones are unnatural or even because the training staff has a much more limited experience with extremely tall players (or likely both), it does seem the injury risk is higher: http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/tall-players-like-joel-embiid-are-more-prone-to-injury/

      the navicular bone thing really makes me nervous. have to hope/think the trainers/orthopedists are 1000000% on top of this.

    49. by the way everyone do yourselves a favor and listen to this:

      si_nba: LISTEN: @SI_LeeJenkins talks about his upcoming Kristaps Porzingis profile in @SInow: https://t.co/lDu4mFGWcL https://t.co/flHiVH8aBl

      Really in-depth look not just at KP but also Melo — in fact I would say in a way, even though KP is the focus of this piece, Melo is the undercurrent. Makes you appreciate how much growth there has been personally with Melo that has shown itself on how he’s playing on the court, and also how he has taken KP under his wing.

      I don’t really know how much Phil Jackson has to do with Melo’s personal growth, but you have to figure he has something to do with it. Jordan, Kobe, now Melo — the Zen Master is for real.

    50. I think losing the last two years had more impact than Phil. Being the main guy on the worst Knicks team ever while also suffering a knee injury has to change you mentally.

    51. Sorry for the above half post

      I don’t think this is actually true — ie. yes you are more prone to injury if you’re tall. Whether it’s because the forces on your leg/foot bones are unnatural or even because the training staff has a much more limited experience with extremely tall players (or likely both), it does seem the injury risk is higher: http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/tall-players-like-joel-embiid-are-more-prone-to-injury/

      I find this 538 “analysis” LOLtastic and beneath anything Nate Silver does on politics. All I can say is lol sample size.

      They cherry pick the data to include only the 14 years between 2000 -14 (just happens to include Yao Ming who missed something like 260 games after playing 3 consecutive 80 game seasons) and Bargs and includes ONLY lottery picks (the first half of the draft, cutting the sample size further by half artificially).

      Then look at the data. They separate the players into 4 tranches: under 6’3″,/ 6’4 – 6’7, / 6’8″ – 6’11” and 7 foot and taller. All the first three tranches have virtually identical injury rates! I actually finding it amazing the 6’8″ thru 6’11 guys have a LOWER injury rate than the Mugsy Bogues’s!!!

      But then something magical happens when you grow an inch or more taller than 6’11” , your injury rate “skyrockets”. Maybe , just maybe, the answer isn’t something makes seven footers more injury prone than 6’8″ to 6’11” players and maybe Ming and Bargs skew a very small sample size.

      I got my degree in Biology over 40 years ago and my statistics professor always drummed into our heads whenever analyzing a study, beware of the biases of the examiner.

      LOL sample size and cherry picking data……

    52. Yeah, that study is a joke.

      The risk factors for sustaining an injury probably have little to do with height per se. Maybe there are some issues correlated to height that make certain kinds of injuries more probable…for example, primary rebounders and shot-blockers with high centers of gravity relative to other players are more likely to land off-balance or on someoone else’s foot, or to have their legs rolled on by smaller players than perimeter players. But I don’t think it’s logical to bring up Yao and Sampson any more that to bring up Kareem and Dirk. Every player has a different anatomy, and sometimes shit just happens. This particular injury should be taken for what it is…a minor tweak that doesn’t require x-rays or an MRI for now.

    53. I’m not a doctor and I didn’t even stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night but I wrote this 1 week ago…prophetic?:

      Brook played 2500, 3000, 2800 minutes his first 3 seasons (starting at age 20) while Robin played 600, 1000, 1000. Brook then suffered foot injuries while Robin (his identical twin) avoided them…What is the implication of that for KP? He often looks to be laboring on the court and he hasn’t even hit the rookie wall yet – he hit the Cole Aldrich wall! Does this not suggest in our cathartic exuberance that maybe we need to restrict his minutes?

      Phil and Fish have been negligent in their handling of his minutes – he should play <= 2000 minutes for the year which average out to about 25mpg. I'll be at court side this weekend to watch the Westchester Knicks and it looks like I better scout not only speedy guards but some bigs. KP and Jerian for Boogie and WCS?

    54. But I don’t think it’s logical to bring up Yao and Sampson any more that to bring up Kareem and Dirk. Every player has a different anatomy, and sometimes shit just happens.

      I think there is logic to the Sampson case because the question on the table seems to be about whether the team should be conservative with KP’s minutes or not. Sampson played 2600 minutes his rookie year, and over 3000 his second year (he averaged 38 mins per game and played all 82 games). He injured his knee early in his third season and said: “I should have been out for a year but came back after eight weeks because I wanted to play the game of basketball and the sport that I love. I probably came back a little too early, but we had a chance to go back to The Finals with the team we had, and I wanted to go back with my teammates.” So, from one tall guy to another, he’d probably recommend KP limit those minutes early in his career. Especially since Sampson, being a natural perimeter player, probably sees a lot of his own potential in Porzingis right now.

      What is unclear, however, is whether Sampson’s knee was inured due to impact, or whether his legs had congenital issues. It wasn’t just his knees that did his career in. He quickly developed back issues as well. Which leads us to all the other 7’3″ guys that have played in the NBA. You can LoL all the sample sizes and cherry picked injuries of the Silver study you’d like, but the fact is, of the 24 players that have ever played in the league over the height of 7’2″, only 8 managed to play into their 30s (and Sampson was actually one of them). And ALL of them struggled through congenital health issues to their lower extremities with, it seems, the one exception being Mark Eaton. (And what Sabonis did, to battle through into his late 30s at such a high level is, truly, extraordinary).

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