Knicks Morning News (2016.02.09)

  • [New York Daily News] Derek Fisher fired as Knicks coach, Kurt Rambis takes over (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 06:27:37 GMT)

    Derek Fisher’s reign of error ended with the second-worst winning percentage in Knicks history.

  • [New York Daily News] Knicks Insider: Melo and Porzingis staying put, says Phil (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 05:49:58 GMT)

    Phil Jackson will be looking to improve the Knicks before the trade deadline, but he says his two star players aren’t going anywhere.

  • [New York Daily News] Kurt Rambis focused on getting Knicks into playoffs (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 05:41:14 GMT)

    Kurt Rambis’ stint as head coach of the Timberwolves from 2009-2011 was a disaster, but he’s getting a chance from his friend Phil Jackson.

  • [New York Daily News] Isola: Jackson firing Fisher a loss, Thibodeau would be win (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 03:39:51 GMT)

    For several weeks now, the buzz among NBA executives and coaches is that Luke Walton may very well be Phil Jackson’s next disciple.

  • [New York Times] Durant, Thunder Pull Away to Beat Suns 122-106 (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 06:06:34 GMT)

    Once Oklahoma City star Kevin Durant found his shot, it was all over for slumping Phoenix.

  • [New York Times] Pelicans Beat Timberwolves, End Four-Game Losing Streak (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 05:06:28 GMT)

    The New Orleans Pelicans started their Mardi Gras celebration a few hours early, snapping a four-game losing streak by blitzing the Minnesota Timberwolves 116-102 on Monday.

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Pro Basketball: Tony Parker Set for Olympic Bid (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 05:02:16 GMT)

    Spurs point guard Tony Parker has reached an understanding with his pregnant wife that will allow him to take part in France’s Olympic qualifying tournament in July.

  • [New York Times] Pelicans Snap 4-Game Skid With Easy Win Over Wolves (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 04:57:35 GMT)

    Mired in a four-game losing streak and sinking further out of contention in the Western Conference, the New Orleans Pelicans were in desperate need of a confidence builder.

  • [New York Times] Raptors Beat Pistons, Move Into Second in East (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 04:33:27 GMT)

    Andre Drummond’s length-of-the-court heave could have thrown the streaking Toronto Raptors for a loop. They instead turned the game into a romp.

  • [New York Times] Lillard Has 33 to Lead Blazers Past Grizzlies 112-106 (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 04:30:51 GMT)

    Damian Lillard scored 33 points, C.J. McCollum had six of his 21 points in overtime as the Portland Trail Blazers defeated the Memphis Grizzlies 112-106 on Monday night.

  • [New York Times] Raptors Beat Pistons 103-89, Have Won 14 of 15 (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 04:12:53 GMT)

    When Andre Drummond’s shot from about 80 feet dropped straight through the net to end the third quarter, Toronto’s lead was down to five points, and it looked like this game against the Detroit Pistons might come down to the wire.

  • [New York Times] James, Irving Lead Cavaliers Past Kings 120-100 (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 04:09:54 GMT)

    LeBron James came close to his 40th career triple-double several times this season.

  • [New York Times] Vucevic Leads Magic Comeback for 117-110 OT Win Over Hawks (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 04:03:42 GMT)

    Nikola Vucevic scored 25 of his 28 points after halftime, and Orlando rallied from 20 points down to beat Atlanta 117-110 in overtime on Monday night, helping the Magic beat the Hawks for the second time in two nights.

  • [New York Times] Nets’ Buzzer-Beater Gives Them a Victory Over the Nuggets (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 03:52:23 GMT)

    Joe Johnson hit a 3-pointer as time expired after Denver had taken a 2-point lead with 0.9 of a second left.

  • [New York Times] Redick Leads Clippers to 98-92 OT Victory Over 76ers (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 03:18:46 GMT)

    J.J. Redick had 23 points, including the tying 3-pointer late in regulation, and Jamal Crawford also scored 23 points to lead the short-handed Los Angeles Clippers to a 98-92 overtime victory over the Philadelphia 76ers on Monday night.

  • [New York Times] George’s Big Finish Leads Pacers Past Lakers 89-87 (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 02:51:43 GMT)

    Indiana’s Paul George scored all seven of his second-half points in the final 71 seconds Monday night and Monta Ellis made two free throws with 20.6 seconds left to seal an 89-87 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers.

  • [New York Times] Grizzlies 91, Knicks 85: Without Carmelo Anthony, Knicks Put Up a Valiant Fight, Then Fade (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 02:46:39 GMT)

    Arron Afflalo had a chance to tie the game in the final seconds for the cold-shooting Knicks, but the ball rattled out.

  • [New York Times] Walker Scores 30 as Hornets Beat Bulls, 108-91 (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 02:42:49 GMT)

    Kemba Walker scored 30 points, and the Charlotte Hornets led from the start and beat the Chicago Bulls 108-91 on Monday night.

  • [New York Times] Next! Kurt Rambis Is the Knicks’ Coach for Now (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 02:04:42 GMT)

    Welcome to the transitory world of the Knicks, who have had 10 head coaching changes since Jeff Van Gundy quit the team in 2001.

  • [New York Times] Derek Fisher Pays With His Job as the Costly Losses Pile Up (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 01:18:52 GMT)

    With the team 23-31 and falling out of playoff contention, the Knicks fired Fisher on Monday and named Kurt Rambis the interim coach.

  • [New York Times] News Conference Is Live, but Not on MSG (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 00:46:09 GMT)

    After the Knicks fired Coach Derek Fisher, MSG Network, unlike ESPN and NBA TV, chose to record Phil Jackson’s news conference to play it later.

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    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    89 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2016.02.09)”

    1. Opening up a question to the group, who is far more informed than I am.

      Isola is saying that Phil has an opt out after this year, and that both Phil and Walton could go to the Lakers in the offseason. He also points out their love for both the Lakers and the West Coast

      Keeping in mind that Isola is a frequent basher of all things Knicks, this one still got me a little concerned. Is this plausible?

    2. I get the feeling that Phil isn’t and will never be that comfortable here… physically, emotionally, spiritually… I still think its odd that he’s here to begin with…

      Full disclosure… I am extremely uninformed… but I think that it is indeed plausible…

    3. Imo there’s no way Phil will go to L.A. after his run-in with Jerry Buss–there’s a lot of bitterness and bad blood and wounded pride on both sides of that relationship.

      I don’t think he’ll opt out either as that will hurt his legacy which he wants to secure by bringing his original team back to prominence/title contention. Unless his health deteriorates or the team becomes an utter fucking disaster, I see him living out his contract and then handing the reins to someone else (hopefully not Houston, Isiah, or Mills.)

    4. that article reminded me of one thing that always seems true about best of all time lists. Almost no one lists anyone they don’t personally remember. There’s no way that Shaq was greater than Wilt or Kareem and probably Russell too. But he’s in many people’s lists because they remember him being dominant in his era.

    5. “Frazier throwing a little shade at Curry”
      Three things that I loved about the article —
      – Frazier’s “Come on man” comment when asked where Curry stands all-time
      – Brett Brown calling Jimmy Butler’s 53 points the best individual performance he ever saw. That was a great game but the guy’s an NBA coach and he’s never seen a better performance than that? Really?
      – Clyde calling his own Game 7 performance in the “Willis Reed Game” the best individual performance he ever saw.

    6. Clyde calling his own Game 7 performance in the “Willis Reed Game” the best individual performance he ever saw.

      I was just about to comment on that!

      First of all, inspired decision to add Clyde to that panel so we actually had some balance from the Jordan Jordan Jordan blahfest.

      Second, he is citing himself, right? At first I thought he was citing Willis, but Willis barely performed that day.

      What’s the best individual performance you’ve seen?

      Frazier: The Willis Reed game. It was Game 7 (of the 1970 Finals), everything on the line. Win or go home. This is it. A lot of guys have had a Game 6 like that, a Game 5 but not a Game 7 where it was all there. That’s why. The odds were against us. We were playing three of the greatest players to ever play the game in Chamberlain, Baylor and West. Without your best player.

    7. Rumors/reports are strong that Jeanie’s gonna clean house this summer removing her idiot brother and Kupchak. If that happens, Phil’s gonna be wearing a silver and gold blazer; that’s the job he’s coveted. He’s already hinted several times that he wouldn’t remain through the 5 years but wanted to change the culture and build a foundation. I think he would have to stay longer than 2 years to achieve that but nah, not at the expense of his happiness over the rest of his life. He will take Horace Greeley’s advice: Go West Young Old Man.

      Upon his inevitable departure, Phil will have made 4 major decisions: (1) Re-sign Melo (2) Draft Porzingis (3) Sign Lopez (4) Play the Triangle. Two of those will have worked out great, but the other 2 are very dicey at the moment. It’s possible Melo’s NTC contract was a Dolan condition of the 60M deal but Phil never denied that so he has to own it. Overall Grade: B

    8. – Clyde calling his own Game 7 performance in the “Willis Reed Game” the best individual performance he ever saw.

      He is objectively correct. Nobody ever played a better game vs the best opposition in a game 7 under more adverse circumstances….

    9. – Clyde calling his own Game 7 performance in the “Willis Reed Game” the best individual performance he ever saw.

      That was awesome. And hey, he’s right.

      And he went back to the well a little later too….

      “When I look at him, the guy has been an All-Star twice. Come on man, the guy doesn’t even have a track record. This is what I’m saying that they do today. They just catapult you. What if I had a Game 7 like that today? If I had a Game 7 like that? Come on. I’d be a household name forever. It took me three more years (of averaging) 20 points before they mentioned me in the same breathe as Robertson.”

    10. I don’t see Phil leaving early, unless the team is doing well already.

      For all his faults, he’s been consistent: he wants a triangulating, passing, non-ball-hogging team, with good defense. He has never wavered from that, and all his moves are consistent with it. He’s also stubborn, and dogged. He will not give up.

    11. I don’t see him leaving, either.

      But I also don’t see him going all in on the Porzingis timeline, which is what any smart person with a time horizon beyond 3 years would be doing right now.

      He is trying to build a winner around Melo, and that could hurt us significantly down the road.

    12. Woj made the point in his piece about the firing that Phil’s timeline may also hurt us in the hiring process of the next coach. Would Walton want to come here and commit himself to being part of Phil’s triangle orthodoxy if Phil is going to be out of here in a couple years at the latest? It kind of puts an expiration date on the next coach as whoever becomes the new executive in a couple years would presumably want their own coach sooner rather than later. I can;t see any candidate we would really want agreeing to those kind of circumstances. Rambis or Shaw however? They would probably go for it. Unfortunately, I think Rambis is going to end up with this job long term.

    13. I don’t see him trading KP either, though.

      What I do see him doing, however, is hiring an unsuccessful triangle coach after Walton turns us down, a la Rambis/Shaw. See the Woj piece for that great insight.

    14. We keep talking about Phil wanting the Triangle, but actually he says he wants “system” basketball, but it doesn’t have to be the Triangle per se. By system basketball, I think he means that he wants a system of motion and ball movement that adapts to what the defense is doing in a read and react way. He hired Fisher to do that and it didn’t get, at least it didn’t get done well enough. My eye test saw a lot of half court situations where the Knicks didn’t move much and didn’t generate good looks resulting in offensive droughts. I don’t see why system basketball couldn’t work today if done right, but it seems very hard to do right.

    15. I don’t see him trading KP either, though.

      Whoa! I didn’t mean to suggest that.

      No, what is more likely is we will waste the opportunity to surround KP with core players and a coach that fits his developmental timeline because we’re going to prioritize “winning now”.

      The more things change around here…

    16. We keep talking about Phil wanting the Triangle, but actually he says he wants “system” basketball, but it doesn’t have to be the Triangle per se. By system basketball, I think he means that he wants a system of motion and ball movement that adapts to what the defense is doing in a read and react way. He hired Fisher to do that and it didn’t get, at least it didn’t get done well enough. My eye test saw a lot of half court situations where the Knicks didn’t move much and didn’t generate good looks resulting in offensive droughts. I don’t see why system basketball couldn’t work today if done right, but it seems very hard to do right.

      Do we honestly have to collectively pretend that Phil’s Bulls and Lakers teams didn’t break away from “system basketball” extremely frequently in favor of straight up isolation basketball?

      I actually thought our offense, for the most part, frequently exhibited ball movement and all the characteristics of a system you would expect. I don’t know if Derek was the architect or the inhibitor of this, though. But it’s not like occasional bouts of isolation are fireable offenses.

      The problrm with this team hasn’t been the lack of ball movement or a broken system. It’s that we can’t defend guards for shit and we don’t have the depth to withstand an injury to Melo, who has been injured often.

    17. No city appreciate defense like NYC. Thibs would be a fantastic pick up and I think he learns from Chicago and manages his players better.
      The man gets the most from his people. If he learns how to strike a balance from setting high expectations and destroying a player physically, he might be the best there is today.

    18. I’m not going to pass judgement on Rambis and say he’s a bad coach simply because he had a bad record with the Twolves. First of all, Kahn is a joke. He never got the type of players Rambis wanted or needed for the Triangle. Drafted 2 PGs in the same draft, neither of whom were Steph Curry.

      And Kevin Love? You mean the guy who has proved to not even be a good number 2 option on a good team? Rambis should be blamed for not making the Twolves a good team with Kevin “better version of David Lee” Love? Sorry.

      Also, unlike being a player, coaches don’t have a strict time line on when they have to get better. A player has until about 28 or 29 to reach their peak and then any improvement they get with learning the game is offset with physical decline. A coach doesn’t have that same time line. They can kind of suck early on but learn from their mistakes. He’s taken assistant coaching positions since the Twolves. I believe he’s probably better now than he was then and will be an improvement over Fisher at least with X and Os.

    19. Of course, Charley Rosen has to weigh in on the Fisher–>Rambis transition. Claims the Matt Barnes incident must have played a role, suggests Fisher was a fool to not rely more on the counsel of the greatest NBA coach ever, blah blah blah.

    20. From the Rosen article:

      Forget about his miserable 32-132 record at the helm of the Minnesota Timberwolves from 2009-11. That’s because Rambis wasn’t permitted to hire his own assistants, and most of them perpetually undermined him in hopes that they’d succeed him.

      That makes sense. Say, did Fisher hire Rambis and Cleamons?

      Geez, Charley Rosen, I know Jackson is a pal, but dang, that was some bullshit worthy of Marc Berman’s most laughable “I am writing what MSG asked me to write.”

      And don’t be surprised if the Knicks show marked improvement in every aspect of the game under their new leader, so much so that they could easily challenge for a playoff spot.

      If this does happen, Jackson may not have to search for another coach.

      So, they could challenge for a playoff spot or they couldn’t? Salient, Charley, salient!!

    21. It all makes me love Chris Herring even more and more. Even Isola, the dude has his biases, but at least they are his biases, he’s not a mouthpiece for someone else like Berman and Rosen.

    22. Do we ever chant TRIangle TRIangle? No, it’s DEEfense DEEfense. Why doesn’t Phil follow his teacher Red Holzman’s philosophy closer and focus on that? Get Thibs in here NOW. He loves NY and wants this job bad. Phil is now a west coast dude, as is Rambis. Get ’em outta here. Bring back Donnie Walsh and hire Thibs or JVG.

    23. I like Thibs a lot, but honestly, I think he’s a better fit for a team that is on the cusp of being a contender. Like if he coached OKC, I think that would be really interesting.

    24. I have zero problem with firing Fisher. I don’t understand why there is all of this angst over it. If Luke Walton has an issue with Phil firing a coach who was 40-96 his first two seasons, embarrassed himself and the entire organization by creep fucking a teammate/friend’s ex-wife, and lost the confidence of veterans in his locker room then that dude isn’t as smart as the media is making out to be.

    25. The idea of Thibs running Melo and Zinger out there for 40 minutes a game in an effort to “win now” scares the crap out of me.

    26. Hubert,

      I agree we can’t defend guards and it is a big problem. But on offense, I felt like I only saw enough motion some of the time and it didn’t seem to me that we had enough motion at the end of games when we had to have a basket

    27. The problrm with this team hasn’t been the lack of ball movement or a broken system. It’s that we can’t defend guards for shit and we don’t have the depth to withstand an injury to Melo, who has been injured often.

      Exactly.

      I’m not sure about Thibs either. He’s very clearly a good coach, but he also seemed unable to get a team to the playoffs healthy. I don’t know if that was coaching, bad luck, or a front office thing, but it would give me pause.

    28. For all his faults, he’s been consistent: he wants a triangulating, passing, non-ball-hogging team, with good defense.

      Change triangle to ‘read and react system’ and add in without players who are horrible assholes or complete dipshits and it’s pretty obvious that Phil isn’t trying to recreate his Bulls or Lakers teams, he’s trying to recreate the Spurs. Which would be great! But is it possible without a Pop? I hope so!

      I don’t think Fisher got fired because of iso ball, I think he got fired because the Knicks would routinely fall far behind and have to battle back and because we consistently lost games in the final two minutes and he wasn’t able to fix either of those problems.

      As far as other running the team instead of Fish, Phil said in the press conference that he wasn’t taking the advice of more experienced coaches around him.

    29. The idea of Thibs running Melo and Zinger out there for 40 minutes a game in an effort to “win now” scares the crap out of me.

      Yeah, exactly. I don’t have huge problems with stuff like that if the team is a title contender (but even there, wait until the playoffs before you really start laying it on them) but for a team that is barely an #8 seed? That’d be some scary stuff. We already saw Woody overplay Melo. I don’t need to see that show again.

    30. We were exactly killing it when Melo came back either. I am more convinced that trading him in inevitable. I am just more concerned with keeping him around until KP can develop and mature to being able to take on the burden of having a team built around him.

    31. Melo is never leaving.

      Well, then its to our disadvantage because we sure as shit aren’t contending while his superstar window is open. I just don’t see the point of having him languish here while the opportunity for him to play for title contention and the opportunity for us to acquire rebuilding assets exists.

    32. Oh, I totally agree. Just saying that he’s never leaving. I wish he was (as much for his sake as for the Knicks).

    33. Then we must force him out! Tell him to go away and never come back.

      But seriously, why would he want to stay in a city with no hope of a championship contention?

    34. Thibs is Mike D’Antoni. Everything about them is the same except one man applies himself to defense and the other offense.

    35. But seriously, why would he want to stay in a city with no hope of a championship contention?

      My best guess is that he figures that the odds of him winning a championship anywhere else aren’t great, either, but in going to, say, Los Angeles, he’d…

      A. Be leaving New York, which he loves
      B. Be moving his kid, which he doesn’t want to do (this is less an issue as his kid gets older)
      C. Be “giving up” on winning here, which he has made a point of saying he won’t do (as he thinks it makes him look bad to “come home” and then leave without achieving much here)
      D. Be giving it all up and not even be in a good position to win a championship

      So if he’s not going to have good odds of winning a championship (which he wouldn’t if he went to Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston or Houston), then he figures he might as well play in the place he wants to play.

      I think things would be different if Golden State and San Antonio didn’t loom so very large, then him joining, say, the Clippers, would legitimately put himself into the mix for a title this season and then maybe he’d be more willing to go there.

    36. KnickfaninNJ, while I was quoting you, I was really rhetorically replying to Phil Jackson, who seems to have idealized his past success and is holding Derek up to an unreal standard. There wasn’t a lot of motion on those late game shots Jordan and Kobe took so much.

      Of course, Derek is doing the same with Arron Afflalo, so it’s not like he’s blameless.

    37. I think things would be different if Golden State and San Antonio didn’t loom so very large, then him joining, say, the Clippers, would legitimately put himself into the mix for a title this season.

      By this standard he’d never have a shot at winning championship wherever he plays. Because if him joining the Clippers doesn’t make them a legit contender pretty much no one else available via trade will. Basically, you’re saying that all his talk about winning a title in NYC is bullshit because the Spurs or Golden State are going anywhere in the near or immediate future.

    38. How douchey are the Kings? Who the hell leaks that they will be firing the coach, but not for a couple of days? Who the hell asks a coach to coach a game knowing that he’s going to be fired. Not “the odds are that we will fire him” but “we will be firing him.” So jerky. Just fire him now, a-holes.

    39. By this standard he’d never have a shot at winning championship wherever he plays. Because if him joining the Clippers doesn’t make them a contender he’ll never play on one. Basically, you’re saying that all his talk about winning a title in NYC is bullshit because I doubt the Spurs or Golden State are going anywhere in the near or immediate future.

      Sort of, yeah. I don’t think winning championships are nearly as important to him as living where he wants to live and making a shit ton of money. His wife is happy here, his kid is happy here, he is happy here, he makes the most money being here – he’s not leaving here.

    40. How is Sign Lopez dicey? Lopez has played pretty well for us and at 14 million a year is a steal for a good starting center.

      Drafting KP and signing Lopez were great, Melo’s contract and Triangle are dicey.

    41. His wife is happy here, his kid is happy here, he is happy here, he makes the most money being here – he’s not leaving here.

      Oh, I say and I say it again, ya been had! Ya been took! Ya been hoodwinked! Bamboozled! Led astray! Run amok!

    42. Wow. Check out Phil’s take on the mess he just posted on Twitter. Say what you will about him, he seems to really believe in his principles. He also says that he is looking for a good leader in a coach, a leader of men. One who elevates his team through self actualization. Most importantly, he’s looking for someone who values “group play,” not necessarily the triangle. Interesting. Sounds like he faults Fish mostly for being a poor leader.

      Still don’t think he would go for any of the Thibs/JVG people.

    43. I really don’t think he’s that weird. He seems sort of like a great coach or a philosopher-king or something. Yeah, I guess he is a bit weird, but ive always loved it about him.

    44. Phil is a crazy cat. I can’t shake the feeling he might be better off focusing a bit more on getting some more talent on this team, and a bit less on moving the culture of the organization towards a higher nature.

    45. So the Kings have decided to not fire George Karl, after leaking that he would be fired imminently. What a god damn catastrophe of an organization.

    46. Most importantly, he’s looking for someone who values “group play,” not necessarily the triangle.

      I don’t think he’d adopt the GSW offense even though, according to stats, their players do more cutting than a group of Benihana chefs. He stated yesterday that knowledge of Triangle was not paramount but important. He didn’t qualify it by saying any motion offense (e.g., Spurs) featuring ball and player movement would be fine. There’s a lot of stuff Phil likes about the Triangle other than ball and player movement including transition to defense and post play. Perhaps most important, that’s the offense he really knows so that’s what he’s gonna implement.

    47. So the Kings have decided to not fire George Karl, after leaking that he would be fired imminently. What a god damn catastrophe of an organization.

      Dolan must be so happy that there is another organization out there that is a bigger joke than his own.

    48. Great line on Twitter:

      Divac: you’re fired
      Karl: am I though?
      Divac: …yes?
      Karl: am I really though?
      Divac: …I guess not?

    49. Wow. I read that from Phil. What a load of meaningless phrases that leaves you no less informed than before you began reading. How about just admitting he was handed the Bulls (a team that was so ready to take the next step) on a silver platter and it all escalated from there.

    50. Wow. I read that from Phil. What a load of meaningless phrases that leaves you no less informed than before you began reading. How about just admitting he was handed the Bulls (a team that was so ready to take the next step) on a silver platter and it all escalated from there.

      Idk about all that. The 2 things I drew from it were:

      1. he values systems for basketball which elevate all players and encourage creativity, i.e. sharing and not simply traditional relegating of players to minimalized roles. That’s not just meaningless jargon. The triangle does that (as do other systems).

      That’s contrary to say, the knicks 2013 offense consisting of Tyson dives, Raymond oops, melo doing isomelo stuff, and everyone else spotting up. Which was effective, but may at times run the risk of disengaging other players (example: Ben McLemore in SAC talking negatively about how if youre not Boogie or Rondo, you spot up and that’s it). In addition to having immensely talented players, that’s why you had Phil always doing weird shit like playing Dennis Rodman at the 5, Kukoc as a stretch big, Lamar Odom as a point forward, etc., which is what he means in a sense by transformational rather than transactional, in a strict basketball sense.

      2. Fisher was not hammering this home — otherwise you wouldn’t see the awful screens, porzingis and Quinn passing up opportunities to roll/cut weakside, players completely forgetting to do their respective screens, etc., with regularity — these are not things that depend on a player being talented.
      The BBallbreakdown dude did a nice 10 minute video illustrating some of this, tho I don’t have the link on me.

    51. Well Hubert, I very much hope Phil is listening to you, and that he can find something effective to do about our guards.

    52. All we’d have to do to get the warriors offense running in NYC next year is to hire Luke Walton and then get Steph Curry. It’s not that complicated.

    53. Supposedly Jeff Teague cleared all of his Hawks-related posts off of his Instagram. Possibly on the move? (Yes, this is what it’s come to in 2016 – getting the scoop from players’ Instagram accounts).

    54. Anyone that doesn’t put Wilt in their top 5 NBA players of all time shouldn’t be asked their opinion on basketball.

      Also I think Doc Rivers mistook underrated for overrated. Isiah Thomas?

    55. Perhaps most important, that’s the offense he really knows so that’s what he’s gonna implement.

      Yeah, I get that he wants a triangle-believing coach. But I also think that if Rambis doesn’t shine, and Walton goes elsewhere, we may end up with either Shaw or someone else who believes in “group play.” I think that was the message he was trying to convey in the tweet. He values leaders who transform and elevate the group, which he spent 90% of the post discussing, and believes in group play, which was 9%, and then puts in there that this “includes using the TRIANGLESYMBOL system of basketball, but doesn’t exclude other systems that include group play.”

    56. 7 Principles of a Sound Offense (from here):

      1. Penetration.
      The offense seeks to compromise the defense by penetrating the frontline defenders. This is best accomplished through the fast break.

      2. Spacing.
      Proper spacing ensures that any attempt to help, trap, and recover requires defenders to travel 15 to 20 feet from player to player. When the defense commits, an offensive player should always be open.

      3. Ball and player movement with a purpose.
      Players must move and move the ball with a purpose. The offense should keep the defense occupied on and off the ball. Players are indoctrinated with the mantra “there are five men and one ball, so each player will only have the ball 20 percent or less of the time the team is in possession of the ball.”

      4. The ball handler must be able to pass to any of his four teammates at any given time.

      5. Offensive rebounding and defensive balance.
      On all shots taken the offense provides strong rebounding positioning and defensive balance to get back and prevent the opposition’s transition opportunities.

      6. Versatile positioning.
      Every player should be able to fill any spot on the floor regardless of their role. All positions are interchangable.

      7. Utilizes individual talents.
      Tex liked to say that Michael Jordan taught him this principle. The offense should be able to utilize it’s best players and put them in the best positions to score.

      ——————-

      Sounds good to me. Nothing in there against tons 3’s and PNR, either.

    57. Yeah, I get that he wants a triangle-believing coach. But I also think that if Rambis doesn’t shine, and Walton goes elsewhere, we may end up with either Shaw or someone else who believes in “group play.” I think that was the message he was trying to convey in the tweet.

      The notion that Shaw is a viable candidate for this job is ludicrous. Hiring a shitty coach because he’s the only one available who believes in your system? That’s not a good idea. Hopefully he’ll surprise us, though, and get someone good. Or at least Walton.

    58. @67

      In that vein I’m creating the rhombus offense.

      #1. Any time the ball handler is in a situation where he can take a high percentage shot (accounting for reward, defense, game situation, etc.), he should do.

      #2. Players should move to parts of the floor that give the ball handler the optimal chance to score or find another open team with a pass.

      #3. All passes should be to your teammate, without allowing the opponent to steal the ball.

      #4. Dribbling is permitted, but a player should never over-dribble. When a player can beat his opponent with the dribble, he should do so.

      #5. Players without the ball should always be providing space for the ball handler to operate, or disruption of the defense. They can do this by moving or standing in place.

      #6. Some players should commit to recovering any missed shots, while others should prevent the opposition from scoring should the defensive team recover the missed shot.

      #7. Offensive players should react to the defense and find weaknesses when the other team creates them.

      #8. All players on the floor should be either be well rounded and able to do all the functions on the floor (pass, shoot, rebound, etc.) OR they should be so good at a few functions to make up for their deficiencies.

      The Rhombus!™

    59. This is just such a mediocre, tepid “rebuild.” I don’t even have any ideas for how to fix this team anymore. We have Porzingis, Decline Phase Melo, Robin Lopez and a bunch of other guys who are not long-term type pieces. Langston Galloway is an okay bench guard I guess. That is just not much of a core to build around. It seems gobsmackingly obvious that the best way to do something positive would be to move Decline Phase Melo before he declines to “Gee I Hope The Next CBA Has An Amnesty Clause” level, but that seems to be something that none of the relevant parties are willing to entertain.

      This is a neither-fish-nor-fowl team. It’s not a young team with lots of assets who are likely to improve, it’s not a team that has veterans who are true star players, it’s not a very good offensive team, it’s not a very good defensive team, it’s not a particularly athletic team and it’s not a deep team. The Phil Jackson era is like basketball purgatory– it’s not a “win-now” team and it’s not a team doing a rebuild. It’s a team striving for mediocrity in the hopes that the mediocrity will lead to something better. I don’t really get the sense that this franchise is headed in some great direction.

    60. I generally agree, JK47, but at least this team has Porzingis. Teams that have players like Porzingis eventually figure it out, if even for just brief periods of time (like the T-Wolves with KG having their super brief moment in the sun before Sprewell needed to feed his kids).

    61. Phil probably sees a lot of himself in Luke Walton. Especially the way he basically just sat on the sideline and watched as the greatest team in a generation won games in record fashion while people showered him with accolades. “Now there’s a young fella I can relate to!”

    62. I don’t think this is as crappy a rebuild as you guys think. I really think we are one mediocre-to-good PG and coaching/rotation scheme change from being a decent (not great) team, which can then free agent itself to the next level by being both NYC+Good. A decent PG would give you Teague/Afflalo/Melo/KP/Lopez, which is not too shabby.

      I do think you are right about Melo. What does he do after this contract? Do you really think he will pull a Duncan and take much less? I doubt it.

    63. What does he do after this contract? Do you really think he will pull a Duncan and take much less? I doubt it.

      Remain a Knick. And no, not with a pay cut. ;)

    64. He is objectively correct. Nobody ever played a better game vs the best opposition in a game 7 under more adverse circumstances….

      Plus he looked “fly” doing it!

    65. A decent PG would give you Teague/Afflalo/Melo/KP/Lopez, which is not too shabby.

      I like that team. Then if you substitute Batum for Afflalo it becomes awesome.

      What can we give Atl to get him?

    66. I’ve been reading Tommy Dee and Bobby Marks on twitter the last couple of days. Tommy Dee seems very sure of these facts:
      1. Jackson is in it for the long, long haul. As in years, as in potentially a decade, long enough to see through this team succeed.
      2. Blatt is very, very high on the list of candidates despite having almost no media coverage for this.
      3. Phil doesn’t care if the next coach runs the triangle so long as there is a (team) system in place that follows his philosophy. Coaches on short list in order: Blatt, Walton, Thibs (another name that media has dismissed)

      Not sure if anyone here is actually connected somewhat to the Knicks, but in the past, he’s been right about a good deal of things. Anyone of our writers can confirm any of this? I actually like the idea of Blatt and felt he didn’t get a fair shake in Cleveland at all.

    67. @Brian

      Wouldn’t a trade framework like this make the Clips contenders?

      Boston gets: Griffin, Lopez
      Clippers get: Melo plus whatever pieces from Boston they could fit financially other than probably Smart (so like Bradley and Isaiah Thomas maybe)
      Knicks get: Picks from Boston and maybe the clips as well, plus whatever contracts the Clippers and Boston don’t want

      Here’s an example in the trade machine: http://espn.go.com/nba/tradeMachine?tradeId=gsqglfr

      The same framework could work in a trade with Orlando, which covets Griffin as well. Or, I could see Boston doing what it did last time it got great and trading for multiple stars at once. Maybe they acquire Cousins first and that makes them appetizing enough for Melo to waive his NTC.

    68. Re: Rambis — I’m not ready to conclude that he’s a bad coach because of his record in Minnesota. Some coaches do poorly in their first job and turn out ok — e.g., Bill Belechick. Maybe Rambis will be ok this time around.
      Re: the “rhombus offense” — I coach my kids’ rec team. Last year, we were playing against a pretty weak team. After his son threw the ball away three straight trips down the court, the other coach turned to me and said, “That’s our obtuse triangle offense.” Lately, the Knicks have been running a lot of obtuse triangle.

    69. The big knock on Rambis is that he didn’t play Love as much he should have his first year there, which was stupid. But hey, he at least played Love a lot his second year – and the team still sucked. Then Rick Adelman came in, a legit great coach…and the team still sucked. In addition, Kevin McHale also played Ryan Gomes more than Kevin Love (during Love’s rookie year).

      But yes, it was dumb of him to not play Love more his first year there, but beyond that, I think he was just a mediocre coach coaching an awful team. Even the great Adelman took years to get the Wolves to being halfway not terrible.

      I don’t think Rambis will hurt the Knicks. I don’t think he’ll help them, but I don’t think he’s an awful coach. Just a mediocre one. But likely a fine assistant (same with Jim Cleamons).

    70. Kurt Rambis is going to be the Knicks new Herb Williams: as Jackson endlessly cycles through failed Triangle guys, Rambis will always be there.

    71. I think that Phil will fulfill his 5 year deal and then go to LA.

      If Blatt and Thibs are really on Phil’s short list, then why not pursue them right now? Why risk waiting? But, wow, is Blatt really that highly regarded.

      Well tonight will be an interesting night. Will the Knicks get a new coach bump?

    72. @67

      In that vein I’m creating the rhombus offense.

      #1. Any time the ball handler is in a situation where he can take a high percentage shot (accounting for reward, defense, game situation, etc.), he should do.

      #2. Players should move to parts of the floor that give the ball handler the optimal chance to score or find another open team with a pass.

      #3. All passes should be to your teammate, without allowing the opponent to steal the ball.

      #4. Dribbling is permitted, but a player should never over-dribble. When a player can beat his opponent with the dribble, he should do so.

      #5. Players without the ball should always be providing space for the ball handler to operate, or disruption of the defense. They can do this by moving or standing in place.

      #6. Some players should commit to recovering any missed shots, while others should prevent the opposition from scoring should the defensive team recover the missed shot.

      #7. Offensive players should react to the defense and find weaknesses when the other team creates them.

      #8. All players on the floor should be either be well rounded and able to do all the functions on the floor (pass, shoot, rebound, etc.) OR they should be so good at a few functions to make up for their deficiencies.

      The Rhombus!™

      You go ahead and try that, pal. I’ll be out here in The Real World™ doing real-life basketball stuff.

    73. Rumors are Hawks want to blow it up, are they this year’s Portland? Where is our Vonleh and Henderson for Batum type trade?

    74. @86

      Supposedly, Steve Mills and Phil Jackson both think really highly of Blatt. In particular, Mills thinks extremely highly of him having played with him at Princeton.

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