Knicks Morning News (2015.04.26)

  • [New York Times] Grizzlies Hold Off Blazers Rally to Win 115-109, Go Up 3-0 (Sun, 26 Apr 2015 06:56:22 GMT)

    Stung by the loss of point guard Mike Conley, the Grizzlies gritted out their latest victory over the Trail Blazers.

  • [New York Times] Warriors Confident After Sweep of Pelicans (Sun, 26 Apr 2015 06:41:19 GMT)

    Golden State coach Steve Kerr dead-panned that he’d be relaxing on the beaches of Cabo San Lucas while waiting to find out who would be the Warriors’ second-round playoff opponent.

  • [New York Times] The 1st Round of NBA Playoffs Seems Way Too Easy for LeBron (Sun, 26 Apr 2015 06:14:19 GMT)

    The first round of the NBA playoffs seems too easy for LeBron James.

  • [New York Times] Warriors Complete Sweep With 109-98 Win Over Pelicans (Sun, 26 Apr 2015 04:35:19 GMT)

    Stephen Curry wasn’t about to say that shooting over Anthony Davis was easy.

  • [New York Times] Roundup: Bucks Topple Bulls With Layup at Buzzer (Sun, 26 Apr 2015 04:27:49 GMT)

    Jerryd Bayless made a layup at the buzzer to lift Milwaukee to a victory over Chicago, drawing the Bucks to within three games to one in their playoff series.

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Pro Basketball: Dallas Mavericks Coach Rick Carlisle Fined $25,000 (Sun, 26 Apr 2015 03:56:49 GMT)

    Carlisle was fined $25,000 Saturday for criticizing officials after a loss to the Houston Rockets that left his team trailing, 3-0, in a first-round N.B.A. playoff series.

  • [New York Times] Bayless’ Layup at Buzzer Gives Bucks 92-90 Win Over Bulls (Sun, 26 Apr 2015 02:20:44 GMT)

    Jerryd Bayless cut right along the baseline, leaving Derrick Rose a couple of steps behind.

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    Mike Kurylo

    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    73 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2015.04.26)”

    1. It’s a shame that after posting career-best WP numbers this season, Tyson Chandler was unable to go in the playoffs. Oh, wait…

    2. Marc Stein broke a story. The Pelicans are going to offer Anthony Davis a max deal. Wow. Never saw that coming. Do the Celtics teach their players that pulling a guy’s shoulder out of its socket move?

    3. No matter how bad the Knicks are, and no matter how bad they shall remain, at least we don’t have to watch that loser play for us anymore.

    4. The Cavs may have gotten bad JR but they’re also getting good Shump. 9 rebounds, 3 blocks, 2 steals and best defender on the court for the first three quarters.

    5. They go after Crowder after that move on Love? The Cavs should have sent their 12th man to punch Olynyk right in the mouth after that one. The most blatant “injure that mother fucker” move since gravity and hardwood conspired to shatter Shaun Livingston’s knee.

    6. This is why we had to give up Shumpert to get rid of JR Smith and create that extra cap space. I think there’s a chance JR Smith won’t be in the league after this contract expires. No one is crazy enough to give a nitwit like this another contract when you know he’s going to spontaneously combust at a critical point in the season.

    7. JR is an asshole

      Thank God he is not on the team anymore.

      On the Olynyk play, the grab was obviously intentional but I didn’t feel like he was trying to hurt Love.

      That type of play happens five times a game.

    8. March 30, 2015 at 3:40 pm

      d-mar

      I may be going out on a limb here, but I totally expect JR to do something really dumb in the playoffs and cost Cleveland a game.

      But of course, this is the new mature, efficient JR that every team was clamoring for before the trading deadline.

      I know this doesn’t exactly make me Nostradamus, but there were plenty of “experts” who thought he was an excellent pickup for the Cavs.

    9. Just saw the JR play. Holy crap is he a moron. Words can’t describe how happy I am that I don’t have to watch that clown on a regular basis anymore.

    10. Despite JRs playoff dumbassery he was a great pick up for the Cavs and is way better than he was on the Knicks

    11. Kawhis only doing well because of the Spurs system, DRed. That should be obvious to any objective, non-fanboy basketball fan. He can’t carry an offense.

    12. Alecto, cmon JR had the best season of his career as a Knick and was the 2nd best player on a 54 win team. The Mozgov impact was much bigger for the Cavs. And now JR will melt… and I hope he sucks just as bad for them the rest of the playoffs as he did for us after he clipped Terry. He’s the worst guy in the NBA to root for.

    13. JRs best seasons were his first two knicks seasons and most of his Denver tenure. His season in Cleveland outclassed the later portion of his tenure in new york and he plays an integral role on a title contender (something our 54 win Knicks weren’t, except in a fringe sense). I hate him as much as the next guy, but Cleveland has utilized him quite well, even if Mozgov affected the team more.

    14. How can you cut any slack to a guy who admitted that he partied too much when he was in NY and it affected his play? That’s just mind numbingly idiotic.

    15. I mean I’m not saying I would have him on my team, I’m just saying that Cleveland has utilized him well thus far. He’s got major behavorial issues and is a moron but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have some value as a player trying to make a championship push. Behavorial issues and dumbassery don’t negate the fact that he brings a certain measure of value on the floor.

    16. How can you cut any slack to a guy who admitted that he partied too much when he was in NY and it affected his play? That’s just mind numbingly idiotic.

      Because I suspect that were I in J.R.’s position, I would have a hard time not finding time to spend several of my $34,000,000 earned dollars, being that I were a (1) young (2) tall (3) athletic (4) celebrity (5) rich (6) man in New York Motherfucking City. I bet J.R. Smith has done more cool shit in one weekend in NYC than you and I have in months.

      Not saying it’s smart or wise or ethical (cuz contracts for employment and such), but that’s the deal. Lots of players can’t handle the NYC nightlife. J.R. was just unfortunate enough to be traded here, where he’d spend a majority of his time.

    17. He’s not questioning why JR did that.

      That is pretty obvious.

      He’s wondering why would anyone be ok with such unprofessional behavior.

    18. Because i think being a generally nice but dumb and party oriented person doesn’t really warrant the invective he’s getting (he shouldn’t be in the NBA? Really? Andrea Bargnani is in the NBA)–any behavorial issues he has pale in comparison to actual cancers like Rajon Rondo et al yet people on this board act as if he’s the antichrist.

      I’m glad he’s not on our team anymore but people act as if he’s useless just because he’s a head case which is lame and stems more from misplaced anger than anything approaching a real reason.

    19. I dunno, putting your own partying, getting suspended ways before the team is hardly “nice.”

    20. @27 THCJ, you’re right, JR can do whatever he wants with his money and fame. Hell, David Wells was out partying with SNL cast members and then pitched a perfect game the next day with a raging hangover. Ron Artest says he used to drink Hennessy at halftime of Lakers games. But in JR’s case, he comes out publicly and says it affected his play. That’s where his behavior crosses the line from “just a guy who likes to party” to conduct detrimental to the team (and to the fans who pay his megabucks salary)

    21. Ok, so what is the appropriate penalty for this recidivist offender, I mean fun-loving lovable scoundrel? This was clearly intentional and caused an injury. I’ll be shocked if he gets less than a five game suspension. His coach didn’t help matters by blaming the refs and admitting that he put Perkins in as an enforcer.

    22. The reason people have no patience with JR Smith is because he often plays himself into semi critical positions on his teams, but he blew up in Denver, was fined a million dollars and thrown out of China, blew up in NY repeatedly, and now has blown up in Cleveland. If you can’t see that whatever value he brings to a team is totally swamped by the immature behavior, distractions, and blow ups at the most critical times of the season, you don’t understand the level of professionalism it takes to win. He does not belong in any pro locker room.

      People have had patience with Rondo because he’s a difficult, personality but he has also played incredible basketball in the playoffs and has won a championship. He has been professional. This is really the first time he’s gone over the top. HE WILL get punished for it contract time. There are going to be teams that won’t deal with him anymore. I think JR is going to be out of the league soon.

    23. the level of professionalism it takes to win.

      Andrew Bynum, Lamar Odom, Metta World Peace, Dennis Rodman, and Latrell Sprewell would like to have a word.

      I’m not saying that we should give JR carte blanche–I’m just saying that, yes, he’s infuriating, and yes, he’s wasting talent and doing the wrong things. But it’s not as if there are other players who are interpersonally far worse than he is. He’s an idiot with no willpower but it’s not as if he’s DeMarcus Cousins, Stephen Jackson, or Rondo who are from as far as I can tell are genuinely unpleasant people. Or, for that matter Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, Dwight Howard, and other superstars who are actually objectively terrible people. What I’m saying is that, basketball skill notwithstanding, these people are way worse than JR and acting as if he’s a terrible person instead of just a profoundly negligent dumbass is really uncharitable.

      And I don’t think you can discount the impact he’s had on Cleveland just because of his idiotic flagrant in the playoffs. He did decent work for them, and that doesn’t deserve to be expunged because of the foul. I’m glad he’ll never be on my team again, but I don’t think his value is negative when he’s one of the last pieces (along with Mozgov and Shumpert) needed to give your championship team an edge (a la Cleveland). And, even if it is negative, he’s 1000x more valuable than Jason Smith or Andrea Bargnani could ever be, and if they get to stay in the league, then so should he. I guess that’s me setting the bar really low, but blame GMs for that. I’d never sign/trade for him in any other situation though.

    24. I’d never thought I’d find myself defending J.R. but here we are. What strange times we live in.

    25. I mean I feel the same way. I’m sure J.R. Smith is not particularly pleasant to be around — I suspect he wouldn’t even sit down at the same table as me, and I’m handsome as hell, and know about some advanced basketball stats as well — but I’m not about to chastise the guy for doing things that the average 27-year-old-with-disposable-income guy does in NYC, Seattle, San Francisco, or hell, any major metropolitan areas. As long as he’s not assaulting another person, I really don’t care what he does with his free time. Teams should be smart enough to know their players before they sign them. That’s why Kawhi will always be a Spur and J.R. will always piss his teams’ fans off.

    26. JR is like the attractive trainwreck. You know he’s bad for your team long term but you still want to try to make it work for a little while because you love the benefits. Apparently he can only keep it together for a half season now.

    27. Management and the fans may not be happy, but his teammates are probably OK with it. They may feel retribution could have been done more subtly, but the other team did just pull a teammate’s arm out of its s0cket.

    28. Not saying that I’m not thrilled he’s no longer a Knick. Second-least favorite player in recent years, which is saying something. (The Penguin was the worst.)

    29. I’m curious what percentage of people who call JR “unprofessional” for admitting that his partying has affected his play in the past have never showed up hung over for work before. Or is it just that you hold JR to a higher standard than you hold yourself?

    30. You could make the case that the most unprofessional thing was that he actually admitted to the press that his partying had affected his game. It can’t be that other players have never partied late before a game. They just are smart enough not to say anything.

    31. Athlete’s party a lot more than the public seems to think. JR is just more open about it because he’s an idiot. Granted, the playoff shit was ridiculous, but JR is far from the only player out in the club or smoking a ton of weed before games.

      thenoblefacehumper
      April 26, 2015 at 11:11 pm
      http://knickerblogger.net/knicks-morning-news-2014-07-23/

      Gonna revel in my being right about Aminu, sorry.

      I’m with you. I won’t revel in the part of that thread where I confidently spoke about us having a good offense, though. Whoops!

    32. “I’m curious what percentage of people who call JR “unprofessional” for admitting that his partying has affected his play in the past have never showed up hung over for work before. Or is it just that you hold JR to a higher standard than you hold yourself?”

      See the problem here is that we work way more than basketball players. They have games and practices what, 120 days a year including playoffs. Regular shmucks will work 251 and most of us have to be to work by 9am. NBA games do not start at this time.

    33. I like to go out and have a drink (or 2 or 3) just as much as the next guy. But when I have a big presentation or meeting early in the morning, I try and take it easy on the alcohol and get a good night’s sleep the night before. That’s just being a professional. So if JR has a day game at MSG on a Saturday, it’s not a lot to ask for him to stay in for one Friday night.

      Or maybe it is.

    34. I admit I showed up once completely hungover at work in 2013. It happened once and never happened after that. Unfortunately, at that time I was the chairman of a small company, so I thought it was only right I made public amend to every single employee to at least make an example of myself. I couldn’t suspend myself from pay because I wasn’t receiving any wage to do that work (I was employed by the parent company, which at the time wasn’t paying me anyway because in dire financial straits – tough times here in Italy), but I swear I would have suspended myself from pay for at least a week. I also have to say I wasn’t supposed to go to work that day, but I don’t say that as an excuse; it’s just to point out that JR knows in advance when he has to show up, so when he parties so much that he can’t play right the day after he’s screwing up really, really badly.

      It’s just not acceptable to show up hungover or half-drunk at work. So he can do whatever he wants with his free time as long as it doesn’t impact the quality of his work. That’s all in my opinion.

    35. “I’m curious what percentage of people who call JR “unprofessional” for admitting that his partying has affected his play in the past have never showed up hung over for work before.”
      My guess is that most people have on occasion shown up for work in not the best shape to perform. However, if you look at whatever your job’s equivalent of a playoff game is, the percentage is probably considerably smaller. For example, a young guy who is a lawyer might show up for a regular work day hung over and that is unprofessional but not particularly unusual. If that same guy goes out and gets plastered the night before he makes a closing argument in a trial (i.e., his playoff game), that would be extraordinarily unprofessional. If Rihanna is to believed (I know, consider the source), that’s what JR was doing during the playoffs as a Knick. However, while I have problems with JR’s behavior in general, in this case, I am criticizing only his behavior on the court. Taking my analogy a step further, what he did yesterday would be the rough equivalent of the young guy walking into court and punching the bailiff. MWP got 7 games when he elbowed Harden in the head. JR took a roundhouse swing at a guy and caused injury. A 220 world class athlete clocking a guy in the jaw with his fist could seriously hurt someone. I will be surprised if the NBA takes it as lightly as many of you seem to be taking it.

    36. Here’s my wild, uneducated and manipulative guess: it depends on Love’s injury. It’s the King’s team after all. If Love’s injury is serious enough to keep him sidelined for at least the entire next series, I think the suspension will be 2-3 games. If Love’s injury keeps him out for a week (and I don’t think that’s the case), the NBA will suspend JR for 5 games.

    37. Yeah I’m predicting 3-5 games for JR.

      this is anecdotal but my brother and most his friends are NYC corporate lawyers at big firms and most everyone does cocaine, often in their offices on company time, and certainly when they’re working overtime on a case or when they’re out. I’m not sure in regard to when they’re actually at trial but I would hedge and say no, generally. Drug use/partying at high powered jobs (athletes, wall street, corporate law) is really common in a way that most other people in the working world don’t have an analogue for.

    38. Drug use/partying at high powered jobs (athletes, wall street, corporate law) is really common in a way that most other people in the working world don’t have an analogue for.

      You forgot politicians!

    39. My guess is that most people have on occasion shown up for work in not the best shape to perform. However, if you look at whatever your job’s equivalent of a playoff game is, the percentage is probably considerably smaller. For example, a young guy who is a lawyer might show up for a regular work day hung over and that is unprofessional but not particularly unusual. If that same guy goes out and gets plastered the night before he makes a closing argument in a trial (i.e., his playoff game), that would be extraordinarily unprofessional.

      This is a fair counterpoint. My only rebuttal would be that people seem to be conflating to some extent the Rhianna accusations of JR partying extra hard during the playoffs or whatever with JR’s own comments, which were more to the effect of his overall play was improved in Cleveland by having fewer distractions. If the Rhianna thing is true, then sure I think that’s probably beyond the limits of what’s acceptable, but JR’s comments seemed within reason to me.

      As for the elbow, no defense for that. The celtics were definitely making it a little chippy and it did result in Love getting hurt, but that’s not the right way to deal with it. No surprise because JR is an idiot.

      I would never really try to argue otherwise. It’s just one of my personal hobbyhorses that fans expect athletes to treat their jobs like a sacred duty when literally none of those fans look at their own jobs the same way. That’s the only reason I was pushing back slightly on the “unprofessional” thing.

    40. “I would never really try to argue otherwise. It’s just one of my personal hobbyhorses that fans expect athletes to treat their jobs like a sacred duty when literally none of those fans look at their own jobs the same way. That’s the only reason I was pushing back slightly on the “unprofessional” thing.”

      Yeah fans are almost always unreasonable. Thats why we have the pc answers at pressers

    41. It’s just one of my personal hobbyhorses that fans expect athletes to treat their jobs like a sacred duty when literally none of those fans look at their own jobs the same way. That’s the only reason I was pushing back slightly on the “unprofessional” thing.

      Yes. Plus, J.R. mailing it in on a Sunday noon game is a bit different from a cardiothoracic surgeon being “unprofessional” and going on a wild coke-and-strippers binge the night before a triple bypass.

    42. I’m with Alecto on this one – while JR is a dumbass and I wouldn’t want him on my team, I have to grudgingly admit that at a certain salary level (the “crazy” discount – maybe the mini-MLE), he presents good value. Even if he inevitably spontaneously combusts at some point in the season/playoffs, the likelihood is that your team got more out of him before then than they would have from a replacement-level SG for around the same amount (he will not be making anything close to his currently inflated player option salary).

    43. I don’t think the analogy between the 2 different job types (working man vs star athlete) is appropriate at all. I also don’t think the POV that “working man doesn’t treat his job like gold” holds true either. Like everywhere else in life some do and some don’t. Those that do get ahead and those that don’t usually don’t. BUT there is 1 MAJOR difference between the working man’s job and the NBA player’s job. Unless an NBA player commits a crime or something way beyond the pale like failing multiple drug tests etc. they can’t get fired. Their contracts are guaranteed. If I show up to work half cocked and mess something up I can be gone that day w no compensation. In fact I don’t even have to be drunk I could just underperform or annoy my boss etc etc. The fans are not the problem here. The athletes are.

    44. And considering that Knicks tickets are as expensive as they’ve ever been, it’s pretty clear that the average fan doesn’t give a shit about J.R.’s haze-induced brickery so long as he does a couple sweet dunks.

    45. I’m not sure I’m understanding the relationship between guaranteed contracts (which are a perk that the athletes negotiated for themselves, and something that some non-athletes do have) and how “seriously” either an athlete or a regular person should take their job.

    46. If you think of NBA athletes as the cream of the crop of their profession, the apt comparison wouldn’t be copy room Joe, but senior management who have risen up the ranks (deservedly or not). At that level, many are not at-will and do in fact have “guaranteed” contracts for a term of years, and can only get fired for “cause” under a pretty restrictive set of conditions – not much different from the relevant clauses in an NBA player’s contract. On the other hand, the effect of being hung over on the duties of an executive may differ with those of a physically grueling sport.

    47. What % of Americans do you think have guaranteed contracts?

      Very low. That’s because, as nyk8806 correctly pointed out NBA players are good enough at their jobs to demand such perks. I’m still not following the connection.

    48. The original comparison was pro athletes showing up for work hung over and essentially us showing up for work hungover. Perhaps many people on this blog are the elite of their professions. In fact that wouldn’t surprise me at all. But that was not the nature of the discussion. It was a comparison of job performance between us and them. So in this instance the guaranteed contract comparison is legit because regardless of performance athletes can’t lose their jobs whereas most of OUR jobs are performance based.

      Also unionized teachers are not on guaranteed contracts in this sense.

    49. It’s tough to try to compare athletes to the general public in terms of salaries since the contacts are guaranteed and also subject to agents negotiating them, attorney’s fees, insurance, etc… They make a lot of money so preparation and performance should be a high priority. On the same hand we are also paid for our work so we shouldn’t have any different standard for ourselves. JR is probably just one of those guys that look at basketball as his meal ticket and doesn’t really care about the outcome of season for his team. We’ve all worked with people like that. Work is just a thing a lot of people do because they have to.

    50. Why are we trying to come up with analogous scenarios here? Just evaluate the players given the conditions they actually face.

      Analogies are good when the criteria align. Unionized teachers and professional athletes: they each have unions, earn a wage, and are human beings. That’s it.

    51. agreed that the analogy isn’t terribly useful, but a bunch of dudes pseudonymously talking on the internet rarely is.

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