2015-16 Game Thread: Knicks vs. Hornets

The Knicks and their soon-to-be long term head coach, Kurt Rambis, take on the Charlotte Hornets and their annoyingly competent head coach, Steve Clifford.

Let’s go, Knicks!

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33 thoughts to “2015-16 Game Thread: Knicks vs. Hornets”

  1. I’m missing the part where the Knicks add some players and suddenly become a playoff team after what looks like a 32-50 season.

    Porzingis “develops” and adds another 3 wins. We’re at 35. Need another 8-9 wins to have the privilege of being smashed in 4 by the LeBrons. Where they comin’ from, y’all?

  2. Phase one is get on the phone immediately with whatever idiot is going to take over in Philly with a win-now mandate, and start selling Carmelo about Philly really being the sixth borough

  3. So what’s our guess for the trivia question “top four Knicks scorers are in the building, who are they? ” Ewing,Willis and Clyde are there. My guess is Allan Houston.

  4. Porzingis “develops” and adds another 3 wins. We’re at 35. Need another 8-9 wins to have the privilege of being smashed in 4 by the LeBrons. Where they comin’ from, y’all?

    Evan Turner yo

  5. Evan Turner yo

    And now that we have a REAL triangle coach, with a full offseason to teach the magic, we get at least 10 more wins. Because ringz!!!

  6. @10. The thread is about as lively as the Knicks played on D tonight. All probably dumbfounded over the rumors that Rambis might get the gig next year.

  7. Rambis: “That’s kind of been our problem all yr long: What are we hanging out hat on as a ball club?”

    wrong

  8. I have never wanted to read a document more than I want to read the 13-page Hinkie resignation letter.

  9. I have never wanted to read a document more than I want to read the 13-page Hinkie resignation letter.

    It sounds pretty good. Basically sort of a screw you to them for approving the plan and then bringing in Colangelo to replace him just when it was finally going to possibly work out (they claim that they were planning on them co-existing, but come on, when in the world has that ever worked?). It seems like he just quit ahead of having his power stripped from him when Colangelo’s son took over, which was any day now.

  10. Sixers got a ton of picks, some promising young players, impatient owners, an angry fanbasez and they’re going to be run by the dude who extended fucking Bargs. That is a team ripe for a swindling.

  11. I JUST READ THE LETTER

    HIRE HINKIE FOR FUCK’S SAKE IT IS THE ONLY WAY

  12. A tolerance of uncertainty

    This one can be really difficult, especially when the stakes are high. But it’s critical to making rational decisions over the long term. We are all so tempted to simplify when something is hard to think about, simply to get it out of our mind by treating it as impossible. This goes from academic sounding to life altering in basketball team building, though. Looking at a player with an estimated 10% or 20% chance of being a star over the next three or four years can’t be written to zero—
    that’s about as high as those odds ever get.

    That’s surely a very, very high number for any player that is ever available to you to be added to your team. Once you accept that, it becomes clear that shrinking the confidence interval around that estimate (and the estimates of the downside risk at the other end of the spectrum) becomes pretty darn important.

  13. I was a Hinkie fan from a distance but that letter was embarrassing. It is the same letter that is being furiously pounded out by dozens of smart, frothy but absurdly green 19 year olds around the country who have read Poor Charlie’s Almanac and are letting rip on their inaugural hedge fund letter to their Aunt and Uncle for the IRA they’ve been allowed to manage. There were more superfluous, hackneyed investing references in that thing than the men’s room of a Berkshire meeting. The last time I saw that many peripatetic attempts at active voice, staccato bursts of deep wisdom feigning humility was when Marv Albert got run over by that fortune cookie truck.

    Hinkie’s smart. I still think he’s probably a very good GM; writing isn’t deciding. But damn.

  14. Honestly, I don’t see the point in being critical about his larger “vision,” no matter how liberal-arts-cum-MBA-student it reads, particularly since there are several past and current top-level decision-makers whom I believe are functionally illiterate.

    IMO most of the derision and criticism of his letter in the Deadspin comments read like jealous-ass haters. Dude just spent three years as an outsider in an ol’ boys club virtually running a company valued at $470M.

  15. It sure was embarrassingly written, but there’s so much truth in there that I can forgive him for how poorly he wrote it overall. But boy, did he throw in a ton of embarrassing things in there.

  16. Hinkie’s plan was a good one, but he totally overkilled it (nevertheless they are in a good position because it was a good plan). The team is bad, and has no semblance of a ‘core’. They are likely trading some of their recent top picks (noel, okafor and embiid together doesnt look good). They don’t play any kind of system, they are not gonna grow together, because the aint playing shit.

    Hinkie could have added some talent (for christ sake, why dont you go after Middleton or Danny Green, whose contracts will look good after the cap increase), win 10 more games, and still be in an incredible position to win the lottery. It must be depressing playing there, and some of the offcourt issues of Okafor might be in part a consequence of it. Would you work out 100% if you know the team’s goal is to be last in the league? Even if the add Embiid, Saric and their top pick this year, it will pass a couple of years till they can reach the playoffs.

    76ers are still in a good position, because adding assets is always good. But they will have to trade some of them, and they have not yet evaluated what they have (because they arent playing at NBA level). For me, Hinkie has been above average (MCW trade was really good, and other movements too), but i dont think he has done the best for his team.

  17. I totally agree that Hinkie made some notable mistakes, but I think the most galling thing about it all was that just when it seemed like it was going to finally work out, they planned on replacing him. They approved his plan, let him set up the dominoes for years and then hire some other guy to knock them down and get all the credit. That would have driven me nuts if I were Hinkie.

  18. I totally agree that Hinkie made some notable mistakes, but I think the most galling thing about it all was that just when it seemed like it was going to finally work out, they planned on replacing him. They approved his plan, let him set up the dominoes for years and then hire some other guy to knock them down and get all the credit. That would have driven me nuts if I were Hinkie.

    Agreed.

    But it might have been calculated by the ownership. Once Hinkie has done the ‘dirty job’ you get a new shiny GM when everything goes right, and you sell to FAs the nice trajectory of the team, and how this new GM is going to spend to build a competitive team.

  19. Except the new guy is Colangelo, who is an awful GM and is likely to fuck everything up.

    Still, what a terrible letter. Never get high on your own supply.

    Bet the Warriors bring hinkie on board. That was some serious Lacob bait

  20. It definitely seemed calculated to impress an NBA owner (whether any will bite will be interesting).

  21. I liked everything about the letter. Then again, I’m used to reading stuff like that. I’ve been a shareholder of Berkshire Hathaway since just after the 1987 crash. The problem with his approach is that it was probably too idealistic. It assumed that he wasn’t surrounded by fans, members of the media, players, owners, other managers etc… that weren’t complete morons. He was not. Most of them are complete morons incapable of thinking past this or next year. To be successful, he probably had to be a little more pragmatic and try to bring in some decent players on fair contracts a little sooner so everyone could see some actual progress instead of just theoretical progress. It’s not like he’s some nitwit that was pretending to be a shrewd value investor. He actually has some very good assets. You can see see the light at the end of the tunnel. He just has to make a few trades to structure the team properly and then let them grow.

  22. To be successful, he probably had to be a little more pragmatic and try to bring in some decent players on fair contracts a little sooner so everyone could see some actual progress

    You mean, like Jackson did?

  23. You mean, like Jackson did?

    Yes.

    The one player on the team I wouldn’t mind leaving is Afflalo. His contract was structured to not have us tied up long term anyway, but we had an OK and experienced player for the year to add a couple of wins. You could say the same thing about Derrick Williams. He figured to give us something, but we weren’t making a long term commitment to him and we might get an upside surprise. We also added a couple of other pieces that could help here or there.

    As long as you stay with fair and relatively short contracts you can continue moving forward year to year. You only want to tie up the core. (granted Melo’s NTC is a potential problem)

    Guys like Isola and and many fans in NY are already ranting about the slow progress. Could you imagine what would be going on in NY if we took the 76er route to rebuilding? lmao. All hell would be breaking loose. I think building a good basketball team is inherently a long term process. It usually takes 3-5 years assuming you make mostly good decisions, don’t have bad injury luck etc… I don’t think Phil is doing poorly in that area, although you can argue we didn’t get nearly enough in the Chandler deal (especially in hindsight).

    My big problem with him so far is his lack of flexibility when it comes to the triangle and triangle coaches. I know he believes strongly in his system and wants to prove it works without all superstars (just as D’Antoni wanted to prove you could win playing his style until GS proved it), but Rambis vs. Tibs or Blatt? That’s just crazy talk! #neverrambis

  24. Well my problem with Phil isn’t the slow pace of the rebuild so much as the fact that his brand of “rebuilding” caps us out at being a perennial first round (maayyyybeeee second round) exit. My problem with Phil is that his idea of a rebuild isn’t a rebuild at all–it’s just a one way ticket to NBA no-man’s land. I want strong, stable, long-lasting success–the best way to do that is get players like Tim Duncan, Karl Towns, Steph Curry, and Draymond Green on rookie contracts; it also involves players like Corey Joseph or Demarre Carroll on value contracts. That involves draft picks and smart contracts, neither of which Phil has succeeded in acquiring, besides KP (dumb luck) and RoLo (legitimately good signing.)

  25. @ 32 I think sometimes people underestimate just how bare our cupboard was at the end of the ’13-’14 season. Not just from a talent standpoint, but from looking at only having one high 1st round pick in three years coming in.

    I don’t think anyone would’ve had the patience for the Hinkie Plan here. And I honestly believe that keeping Melo was an unwritten condition of PJax’s hire. So I dont have any real issues with what he’s done given what he had to work with from the start.

    I dont believe he’s gonna keep Rambis either. If he does, then I’ll have a legitimate issue.

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