Knicks Morning News (2015.04.10)

  • [New York Times] Essay: Amid a Woeful Circus, Basketball’s Lowly Strivers Carry the Knicks (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 09:00:04 GMT)

    Lost in the historically dismal nature of the Knicks’ season has been the dedication of its makeshift core: the undrafted temp players who have remained steadfast until the bitter end.

  • [New York Times] Curry Breaks 3-Point Record, Warriors Beat Blazers 116-105 (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 06:13:20 GMT)

    Stephen Curry never talks about his case for NBA MVP unless he’s asked. Instead, he prefers to let his play speak for itself.

  • [New York Times] Bulls Topple Fading Heat (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 04:15:37 GMT)

    The Chicago Bulls easily wiped out a 19-point halftime deficit in beating host Miami, 89-78, on Thursday night, dealing a huge blow to the Heat’s playoff hopes.

  • [New York Times] Curry Breaks His Own NBA Record for Most 3s in a Season (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 03:25:28 GMT)

    Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry has broken his own NBA record for 3-pointers in a season.

  • [New York Times] Bulls Pull Off a Staggering Comeback, Beat Heat 89-78 (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 02:43:42 GMT)

    Pau Gasol had 16 points and 15 rebounds and the Chicago Bulls easily wiped out a 19-point halftime deficit to beat Miami 89-78 on Thursday night, dealing a huge blow to the Heat’s playoff hopes.

  • [New York Times] New York Night Life Carries Perks, and Risks, for Athletes (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 01:25:09 GMT)

    The stabbing of an Indiana Pacer player this week outside a New York City nightclub shined a light on some athletes’ late-night appetites.

  • [New York Daily News] Indiana Pacers’ Chris Copeland stabbed near 1 OAK in NY (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 05:01:59 GMT)

    Chris Copeland, a forward for the Indiana Pacers, was stabbed during an argument near the 1 OAK club early Wednesday, NYPD sources said.

  • [New York Daily News] Derek Fisher thinks Knicks can go from worst to first (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 02:24:50 GMT)

    The Knicks’ opponent Friday at MSG won just 15 games last season before improving to nearly .500 and a likely playoff berth one year later.

  • [New York Post] Donnie Walsh’s free-agency warning to Phil Jackson, Knicks fans (Fri, 10 Apr 2015 02:39:11 -0400)

    Citing how the siren song of South Beach lured LeBron James to Miami in 2010, Pacers adviser Donnie Walsh warned Thursday that Knicks president Phil Jackson can only do so…

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    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    26 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2015.04.10)”

    1. Given that it’s the NYPD, and given that Thabo is black, and given that the amount of force used to subdue Thabo resulted in a fractured fibula, I’d be willing to bet money that the NYPD used excessive force–that’s what I’ll think until more evidence comes out.

      Also is there a material difference between a chokehold (Eric Garner, an illegal method of subduing someone) and the headlock used to subdue Thabo?

    2. I’m not too worried, I’m sure that if they used excess force the NYPD will come forward with the truth. Just like how the police department in South Carolina told the truth about how Walter Scott was shot.

    3. I just wonder why Antic was sitting there calmly on the curb and Thabo was being swarmed? What was the difference? I guess we will find out.

    4. “Thabo Sefolosha, 30, an eight-year veteran from Switzerland, was arraigned on charges of resisting arrest, obstructing governmental administration and disorderly conduct after he ran “in an aggressive manner” toward a police officer who had his back turned to Mr. Sefolosha, according to a criminal complaint. It took four officers to place Mr. Sefolosha in handcuffs, the complaint says.”

      Really now? I for one as a black man wouldnt run or walk or chew gum aggressively in front of a cop. Maybe Thabo being european doesnt understand these things in America or maybe the claims are exaggerated.

    5. If the police have a reason to arrest Thabo, and Thabo is resisting that arrest, then tackling him to the ground is certainly not excessive force. But there are a lot of unanswered questions about this whole fracas, and that TMZ video doesn’t really clear things up. Except that Pero doesn’t realize it’s not after memorial day yet.

    6. Yeah, I’m just busting chops. I seriously do believe that there could be a legit reason for the cop’s use of force. We just have no idea what actually happened yet, so we just keep getting info out of context that really needs some context.

    7. Except that Pero doesn’t realize it’s not after memorial day yet.

      When you’re a 7 foot dude born in 1982 Yugoslavia, Memorial Day is when you say it is.

    8. I’m just saying that until more evidence arises we should probably be thinking that Thabo was a victim of excessive force due to the NYPDs tendency to murder and abuse black people and to rough up people of any color. They have a dismal track record. Also putting someone in a “headlock” is dangerously close to putting someone in a chokehold which is illegal per NYPD and municipal regulations and would always qualify as excessive force.

      As a general rule I always side with the arrested in cases like this until more evidence to the contrary arises.

    9. Ok, so if you’re a cop and you are trying to arrest a 6’7″ world class athlete and he is resisting, what level of force would you think is appropriate? Since you operate under the assumption that cops always use excessive force, here’s a question for you — there are about 35,000 cops in NYC. In a given year, how many shoot their gun even once? Don’t google the answer. Tell us what you think. Hint — you will be very surprised.

    10. Almost all dont fire their weapons even once. I’m just saying you shouldn’t be in equilibrium between the arrested and the cops or in support of the cops until enough evidence to fault the arrested shows up. Given that the police are institutionally encouraged to commit abuses of power I don’t think it’s unreasonable to maintain a healthy skepticism of authority even when the police are intimidated by what they likely see as a “big scary black man”.

      We don’t even know if Thabo was resisting before the fact because we don’t have it on video so it’s a little disingenuous to assume that he was resisting arrest and therefore “dangerous” enough to have 6 cops subdue him and break his leg instead of getting roughed up by the cops or something because he was perceived as dangerous.

      Also most excessive use of force happens without the use of guns in the U.S. so I don’t see what your point about police gun use is.

    11. Which was more likely- that the cops were abusing their authority or that someone out at a club at 4 in the morning was acting aggressively enough that he needed to be restrained? I’d say the odds are pretty even.

    12. The NYPD is a gang with badges.
      Every society needs a police department, and sure, there are a lot of good cops, but broadly speaking, cops are bullies who think they’re above the law.

      Cops make charges very easily. If they unreasonably ask you to step back and you feel you’re in a legal spot (and you may correct), they can charge you with obstruction.

    13. The NYPD is a gang with badges.
      Every society needs a police department, and sure, there are a lot of good cops, but broadly speaking, cops are bullies who think they’re above the law.

      Cops make charges very easily. If they unreasonably ask you to step back and you feel you’re in a legal spot (and you may correct), they can charge you with obstruction.

      yup biggest gang in the world. Now thats not to disparage them, its just truth. If you have any neighborhood gang or gangs and try to match up they will always outflank you. Also the obstruction seems to be a catch all i dont like what you said to me charge.

    14. On average, out of 35,000 NYC cops, fewer than 100 fire their weapons in a given year. Given that they arrest several thousand people each year who are carrying guns themselves, that is truly amazing. The fact that, in the vast majority of situations, they are able to subdue and arrest armed people without firing their weapons kind of flies in the face of your argument that they are trained to use excessive force. Yes, there are occasions when cops use unjustified force and yes, minorities — especially young black males — are disproportionately the victims in those situations but, overall, the vast majority of cops in NY show remarkable restraint and do an incredible job in extremely dangerous circumstances. So, I think that they deserve the benefit of the doubt most of the time.

    15. It’s less that police are always inclined to use excessive force and more that police are inclined to use excessive force when engaging with the poor and with racial minorities (especially blacks and latinos). Most cases of excessive force never even make it to court because the judges and police essentially collude and the police version of the story is usually fabricated to implicate the victim and then taken as gospel.

      That the police arrest lots of armed people without firing their weapons also doesn’t mean excessive force isn’t used–if you are armed and subsequently subdued and the police proceed to beat the shit out of you that’s still excessive force. Furthermore excessive force cases are underreported and the statistics currently used don’t accurately capture just how common the occurrence is. There’s a surfeit of anecdote on it; one need only google “NYPD excessive force” to see.

      If it was a white guy they were subduing I’d be more in equilibrium though still a bit skeptical. But until I’m given a good reason to not think that the police responded–consciously or unconsciously–with more force than usual because Thabo was black, I’m still on his side.

      Again, it’s immaterial that the police don’t fire their weapons often when making arrests (I’m sure that when they do it’s usually on black people though) because excessive force isn’t just misapplied lethal force–it encompasses a whole spectrum of abuse and it is specially reserved for the poor and people of color. That most arrests are determined to have used a reasonable amount of force is unsurprising because in the vast majority of cases it is the NYPD themselves who pass judgment on whether excessive force was used. The NYPD has a vested interest in suppressing excessive force cases and overpolicing the streets. The stats simply don’t capture the nature and scale of the abuse.

    16. Also this is an aside but being a cop is not dangerous:

      “To put the risk of policing in perspective: fisherman and loggers are 10 times more likely to be killed on the job than a police officer, a farmer is 2 times more likely to die on the job, according to national figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A logging worker is eight times more likely than a police officer to die on the job, and a garbage man is three times more likely to die while working.”

      http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/6373798

    17. On average, out of 35,000 NYC cops, fewer than 100 fire their weapons in a given year. Given that they arrest several thousand people each year who are carrying guns themselves, that is truly amazing. The fact that, in the vast majority of situations, they are able to subdue and arrest armed people without firing their weapons kind of flies in the face of your argument that they are trained to use excessive force.

      A misuse of advanced stats.
      Don’t be naiive.
      I too, as a kid, used to have great admiration for cops. I grew up in a neighborhood with lots of cops. A lot of my good friends became New York cops and fireman. The dirty truth is there’s a fine line between cops and criminals. . . . and often that line gets crossed. Too often.

    18. You are right– we have no idea if Sefosha wa treated fairly. But let’s think about it — a pro athlete has been stabbed, another pro athlete is under arrest, there are loads of witnesses crowding around, all of whom have cell phones with a video function — what at are the odds that six cops said, “The heck with the witnesses and videos, let’s beat the snot out of another pro athlete for no apparent reason. No one will notice.” My guess is that they are not that dumb.

    19. My guess is that they are not that dumb.

      They aren’t dumb, they just think they can do pretty much whatever they want and they won’t face any consequences.

    20. Now, I may be mistaken here, but I seem to recall this…document. And in this “document” thing is something about how a person is presumed innocent until proven…oh, what’s the word? Not innocent?

      Bah, what do I know. I’m probably making it up anyway.

    21. You are right– we have no idea if Sefosha wa treated fairly. But let’s think about it — a pro athlete has been stabbed, another pro athlete is under arrest, there are loads of witnesses crowding around, all of whom have cell phones with a video function — what at are the odds that six cops said, “The heck with the witnesses and videos, let’s beat the snot out of another pro athlete for no apparent reason. No one will notice.” My guess is that they are not that dumb.

      Johnno…. take another guess!

      What are the chances a SC cop would shoot a man RUNNING AWAY FROM HIM 6 times in the back while he knew with metaphysical certitude HIS OWN car cam would be documenting the entire thing???

      My guess is a lot of people are cops that shouldn’t be cops.

    22. On average, out of 35,000 NYC cops, fewer than 100 fire their weapons in a given year. Given that they arrest several thousand people each year who are carrying guns themselves, that is truly amazing.

      William of Ockham would have a simpler explanation, namely even the dumbest criminal knows the quickest way to the morgue is to take a shot at a cop. If you do, 35,000 guys will instantly drop what they are doing and hunt you down like a dog until they find you and their primary motivating impules will NOT be to bring you to the justice system alive.

      If a criminal shoots you or me, 2 cops will try to figure out what happened…….

    23. On average, out of 35,000 NYC cops, fewer than 100 fire their weapons in a given year.

      I don’t know where you got your statistics, but even if it’s true, that means two different cops shoot at somebody every single week. Perhaps that number should be once a week, or less. If so, that means that at least twice as many cops are shooting at people than should be.

    24. You are right– we have no idea if Sefosha wa treated fairly. But let’s think about it — a pro athlete has been stabbed, another pro athlete is under arrest, there are loads of witnesses crowding around, all of whom have cell phones with a video function — what at are the odds that six cops said, “The heck with the witnesses and videos, let’s beat the snot out of another pro athlete for no apparent reason. No one will notice.” My guess is that they are not that dumb.

      http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/10/us-usa-police-california-idUSKBN0N120H20150410

      (Reuters) – The sheriff of San Bernardino County, California, said on Friday he has suspended 10 deputies involved in the videotaped beating of a suspect who appeared to have surrendered and was lying on the ground after making a failed getaway attempt on horseback.

      Sheriff John McMahon said at a news conference he was “disturbed and troubled” by what he saw in the video, which was shot by a KNBC-TV news helicopter as the confrontation unfolded on Thursday near the desert town of Apple Valley, east of Los Angeles.

      So, just a coincidence, but apparently lots of cops are pretty dumb.

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