ESPN New York: Knicks agree with Langston Galloway

The Knicks have agreed to a two-year contract with point guard Langston Galloway.

Ian Begley has the details at ESPN:

The Knicks have agreed to a contract with point guard Langston Galloway for the remainder of this season and the 2015-16 season, league sources told ESPNNewYork.com.

Galloway’s second 10-day contract with the Knicks expired earlier Tuesday, so he had been free to sign with any team.

His contract for the 2015-16 season contains a partial guarantee, according to league sources. Galloway has impressed the Knicks’ coaches since being signed to his first 10-day contract Jan. 7.

The stumbling block as to this deal getting done was that Phil Jackson didn’t want to commit any of his upcoming cap space unless he had to. A cap hold is $500,000. A fully guaranteed second-year contract is $800,000. So that’s just $300,000, but I guess Jackson believed that $300,000 might turn out to be very valuable. So my guess is that the partial guarantee for next season is $500,000.

I saw someone note that the Knicks are in danger now of losing Galloway after next season, but I don’t think that’s much of a worry. The Knicks will have a lot of cap space, so if Galloway somehow develops into a star (which seems unlikely), they’ll be able to keep him. I don’t see Galloway getting even a MLE offer next season. Galloway is a bright spot on this team, but he’s more of a back-of-the-team player on a better team. Still worth a roster spot, of course, but I wouldn’t worry too much about losing him in two years. I’d be irked about losing him this year over $300,000, but that’s about it. And there, Jackson called Galloway’s bluff (that Galloway would just try to sign somewhere else) and got the deal he wanted. So good for Phil there.

Along those lines, though, many of us were presuming that the Knicks would pick up Quincy Acy’s relatively cheap qualifying offer for next season ($1,181,348), but I would imagine that the odds are better than not that Acy does not get an offer now. Jackson seems to be valuing cap space over pretty much anyone not named Melo on this roster (it is also why Prigioni will likely be traded this season, as well) so I suspect Acy’s days with the Knicks will be over after this season.

Liked it? Take a second to support Brian Cronin on Patreon!

88 thoughts to “ESPN New York: Knicks agree with Langston Galloway”

  1. I think you’re underselling how well Galloway has played so far, Brian. At least on a rate basis (and yes, his sample size small), Langston has been one of the best rookies in the league. Almost all rookies are not very good, so the fact that Langston is playing like a back of the rotation player on a good team is actually pretty impressive.

  2. But again, even if he turns out to be a star, they’ll have the cap room to keep him.

  3. I agree with DRed. The vaunted 2014 superdraft is going through a very rough season… And Galloway didn’t even get drafted. If he maintains his actual production, there’s a slight chance he could be voted in the 2nd all-rookie team (as of now I guess Wiggins, Noel, Mirotic, Payton, McDaniels are 1st and Napier, Smart, LaVine, Nurkic and Exum are 2nd?).

    Full disclosure: if Embiid, Parker and Randle were healthy we’d be talking about the 2014 as bursting with potential greatness.

  4. But again, even if he turns out to be a star, they’ll have the cap room to keep him.

    I think it’d be more accurate to say, “They’ll have the option to choose to pay him rather than choosing to pay another player.” Had they locked him into a multi-year minimum/near minimum deal, they would be able to keep him AND pay the other player.

  5. I think it’d be more accurate to say, “They’ll have the option to choose to pay him rather than choosing to pay another player.” Had they locked him into a multi-year minimum/near minimum deal, they would be able to keep him AND pay the other player.

    But that’d be criticizing the Knicks for not doing a scenario that they didn’t have a chance to do. Galloway had no interest in taking a three-year deal, for the very logical reasons that we’re discussing now (granted, the Knicks also had no interest in giving him one because they didn’t want to guarantee that second season). If he turns out to be good, he’ll get more money. If he turns out to be decent, he’ll get the same minimum salary offer. So the only risk for him if he just flat out sucks, but I imagine he is quite willing to take that bet. Three-year guaranteed minimum salary deals are not good ones for players.

  6. I agree with Brian. Also, let’s not forget that Galloway has only had one decent game vs. a good team (in a blowout loss to Houston) and his last 6 games were vs. the dregs of the league (except Pelicans who were w/o Davis and Holiday). He looks like he belongs in the league, but let’s see how he does against some real competition before we get all worried about losing him via poison pill.

    My guess is that guys like Galloway are not going to be too hard to find in the D-League in coming years. Why tie up cap space in a guy who is most likely a stopgap tweener at best?

  7. Crazy Zach Lowe stat on Kyle Korver. Korver is shooting 47% on threes. That’s awesome, right? That could lead the league. Oh wait, my bad, I meant he’s shooting 47% on threes when a defender is within four feet of him!!! That’s insane! That’s shooting like peak Steve Novak with a man on you! That’s nuts!!

  8. also, lets not forget that Galloway is not some journeyman d-leaguer, he is a legit fresh out of college rookie. Since he is here to stay. I would like to see him handling more lead guard duties.

  9. It seems Jamychal Green is available again. Berman says Phil mad some inquiries but the knicks do not have any open roster spots. Its not like the knicks did not know that before inquiring about Green so does this mean someone is going to be cut soon?

    Why is Bargs still on the knicks? Knicks can’t even get an injured player exception. He is useless with no trade value so why keep him?

  10. I think Phil still thinks he can trade him. But yeah, he can’t, so he should just cut him. Regarding Green, in the past, I think they couldn’t get him to play for them, as he felt he could end up on a contender. But maybe it’ll be different now. I’d love to see him given a shot. Green obviously knows he is good enough to play for an NBA team, so he’s playing hardball a bit with contracts. These marginal guys are no longer just signing these super-favorable contracts anymore. More and more they’re taking their chances.

  11. I think it’d be more accurate to say, “They’ll have the option to choose to pay him rather than choosing to pay another player.” Had they locked him into a multi-year minimum/near minimum deal, they would be able to keep him AND pay the other player.

    Yes if the Knicks had locked him into a deal he never wanted to take I’m sure they would have been able to keep him and pay another player

  12. I think Phil still thinks he can trade him. But yeah, he can’t, so he should just cut him. Regarding Green, in the past, I think they couldn’t get him to play for them, as he felt he could end up on a contender. But maybe it’ll be different now. I’d love to see him given a shot. Green obviously knows he is good enough to play for an NBA team, so he’s playing hardball a bit with contracts. These guys are no longer just signing these super-favorable contracts anymore. More and more they’re taking their chances.

    I don’t even think Phil thinks he can trade Bargs, but I do think he wants to show Dolan a good faith effort to move him without just waiving him until the trade deadline. If that makes Dolan happy then whatever.

    Green is good, but you have to think for somebody like him PT is a lot more valuable then getting garbage time minutes for a contender or playing in Milwaukee’s “everybody will play 20 minutes a night” system. If I were his agent I’d be trying to steer him to NY because there is an actual system in place offensively and he will get minutes.

    I don’t mind Amundson, but the Knicks should waive him if Green wants to come here.

  13. also, lets not forget that Galloway is not some journeyman d-leaguer, he is a legit fresh out of college rookie. Since he is here to stay. I would like to see him handling more lead guard duties.

    It is worth noting that at 23 he’s a little old for a rookie as is Early. Kyrie Irving is a full year younger, Brandon Knight is the same age, Wall only a year older. Still, the contract seems like a no-brainer.

  14. @8 but he’s also not really a “legit” fresh out of college rookie. He’s 4-year college player from a pedestrian college program who went undrafted. There’s usually a good reason for that. He also averaged 2.2 assists per game and was 8th on his college team in assist%, indicating that he was a shooting guard, not a PG. There’s usually a good reason for that as well.

    It’s pretty rare for an undrafted 4-year college guard to make an impact in the NBA. Galloway could never, ever, ever be a legit 2 on a good team., and the odds are overwhelmingly against him reinventing himself as a solid PG. I love his lunch-pail effort and nose for the ball, and he can definitely score and shoot the 3. But he is not anyone to get worked up over, not yet anyway. We have a stretch of tough games coming up, let’s see what happens.

  15. It’s pretty rare for an undrafted 4-year college guard to make an impact in the NBA.

    Well, it has happened, as those of us old enough to remember a kid from Harvard that used to play for us may recall.

    And those of us even older may remember a guy that went 2-20 against the rockets one game.

    So rare, yes, but certainly not unprecedented. Aside from the two aforementioned Knicks, there have been numerous players that fit your criteria: Raja Bell, David Wesley, Avery Johnson, Darrel Armstrong, and Bruce Bowen are all examples too.

  16. Galloway plays defense. He works hard on that end of the court. The Knicks don’t have anybody else who can play perimeter defense worth two shits. I say “hooray” for this signing. If he’s a primarily defensive-oriented guard who is also not a zero on offense, then congratulations, you have yourself the only two-way guard on the team.

  17. True, but the issue I presume the people who are not thrilled with this deal have is that they think the Knicks should have been pushing for a two-year guarantee with a third year option. I don’t think Galloway would take such a deal (note that Lin did not take that deal a few years ago from the Warriors either – if you’re an undrafted player good enough for a team to want to sign you as a free agent, you want a two-year deal, not a three) but I believe that most people who don’t like the deal don’t like it because they wanted to lock in Galloway for longer. I don’t think there’s anyone here who could possibly have a problem with a one-year deal with a second-year partial guarantee.

  18. Jeremy Lin is barely a rotation player right now, and was outdone by another D-league call-up on a minimum salary. He never played better than a marginal rotation player after fleecing the Rockets with that poison pill contract. He probably wouldn’t play over Galloway on the Knicks right now, and certainly not over Calderon or Prigs.

    Bruce Bowen is 6’7.” He originally signed in 1995 and made no impact until 2000. There was no D-League then. Raja Bell was 6’5″ and took 5 years to crack a TS% of .527. Avery Johnson, Darrell Armstrong and David Wesley were all college PGs.

    Even so, these guys are, as I said, pretty rare. The examples you give are either defensive specialist or undersized reserve-level PGs.

  19. Let’s not forget Wesley Matthews.
    Also, Since his Portsmouth measurements have him at 6’1.5 w/o shoes lets bump him up to 6’3. :)

    Plus, would be so hard for him to become another Patrick Beverley type?

  20. You arguing D League guys can’t work out b/c Jeremy Lin got outplayed in Houston by a D League guy?

  21. If he’s “primarily a defensive guard who’s not a zero on offense” then he sounds like a replacement for Shumpert. That’s not so bad, especially for the salary he’s getting.

  22. If he’s “primarily a defensive guard who’s not a zero on offense” then he sounds like a replacement for Shumpert. That’s not so bad, especially for the salary he’s getting.

    He said not a zero on offense. That would make Galloway an upgrade over Shump.

  23. You arguing D League guys can’t work out b/c Jeremy Lin got outplayed in Houston by a D League guy?

    I was going to ask the same questioned but he did say 4yr undrafted guard. So that canceled out that argument even though he came into the league at 24.

  24. You look at most of these D-League, undrafted guard types and you see a lot of them were undervalued because defense is undervalued. Raja Bell, Wes Matthews, Patrick Beverley, etc. Those guys all meet the “defensive oriented guard who is not a zero on offense” criteria.

  25. http://www.basketballinsiders.com/nba-pm-the-western-conference-arms-race/

    Houston Rockets: The Rockets have already made two midseason moves, but they have still been working the phones. League sources say they have been dangling Jason Terry’s $5,850,313 expiring contract in trade talks, and it seems they’re open to packaging it with picks or prospects in order to complete a deal. Expiring contracts aren’t as valuable in today’s NBA, but certain teams do have interest in ending or non-guaranteed deals. Take the New York Knicks, for example, as they recently gave away Iman Shumpert and J.R. Smith in a cap-clearing move. If Houston can’t pull off a larger trade that lands them a big-name player like Goran Dragic (who they’re pursuing), adding a player like Jose Calderon from New York for Terry’s expiring deal could be a back-up plan for Rockets GM Daryl Morey. It’s important to note that this Terry-for-Calderon scenario hasn’t come from a source and is just speculation (unlike other rumors mentioned throughout this piece), but the swap could make sense for both teams. New York wants to move Calderon’s contract since he is owed over $7 million in each of the next two years and they want to have as much cap space as possible entering the summer…The only issue would be that it would limit Houston’s cap flexibility going forward, which may throw a wrench in the deal. Still, Morey is known for making moves at the trade deadline – he’s active just about every season – and don’t expect this year to be an exception.

    I doubt Morey would take on Jose even if they miss out on Calderon but could Terry fit in JR’s TPE? Getting some picks to maybe trade Calderon in the offseason or maybe even swing a 3-way trade would be nice.

  26. Re: Lin, my point about him is that he was way over-hyped based on a 20 game sample, even though there were signs that the bloom was off the rose, and that his overall production was relatively easy to replace for far less money than he was eventually paid. Similarly, the impact of signing vs. not signing Galloway based on an 8-game sample of so-so play is not a big deal to me. If we lock him up for an extra year on a partially guaranteed minimum deal, great! If he wanted to test the market and not sign, great! I doubt that the next Langston Galloway would be very hard to find, just like finding the next Jeremy Lin in the D-League wasn’t too hard to find.

    As to Beverley, he was a great find in the D-League, and is great value on a minimum deal. He’ll probably get paid nicely, based on his strong play. Maybe the same happens to Galloway, but the odds are pretty long against it. I think Phil handled this one perfectly.

  27. God help me if Jason Terry becomes a Knick. After all we’ve been through this season, that’s the one thing I don’t think I can tolerate.

  28. Bruce Bowen is 6’7.” He originally signed in 1995 and made no impact until 2000. There was no D-League then. Raja Bell was 6’5? and took 5 years to crack a TS% of .527. Avery Johnson, Darrell Armstrong and David Wesley were all college PGs.

    If you add enough parameters, you can obviously rule out any example. But of the “undrafted, 4-year collegiate, guard” parameters, which are already extremely (and pointlessly) narrow, there are examples, both old and recent. Not that they have any bearing at all on whether Langston Galloway will be an impact player whatsoever, so I really don’t understand the point of arguing it.

  29. could Terry fit in JR’s TPE? Getting some picks to maybe trade Calderon in the offseason or maybe even swing a 3-way trade would be nice.

    If Calderon goes out, they don’t need to use the exception because Calderon and Terry match salaries.

    The trade exception is only used if the Knicks want to bring Terry in without giving anything up.

  30. 2 comments —
    – how great will it be if , one year from now, Galloway has played so well that we are all worried that another team will steal him away? That’s a much better problem to have than if he plays lousy.
    – he’s a 23 year old kid who, through hard work , just guaranteed himself about 600,000 dollars over the next 12 months . Good for him . Congrats Langston.
    By the way, anyone else notice that renaldo Balkman is tearing up the D League?

  31. @28 Really? Read my quote again: “It’s pretty rare for an undrafted 4-year college guard to make an impact in the NBA.” You name 7 guys since 1988 (that’s when Avery Johnson broke into the league) and you have a problem with me saying it’s “pretty rare?”

    No, it’s not unprecedented, nor is it unprecedented for a 57th pick to go on to have a HOF career. Just exceedingly rare.

    And I only had 2 parameters: “4-year college career” and “undrafted.” Since these parameters apply to the vast majority of NCAA players, I would hardly call them narrow. Given the “one and done” nature of today’s college to NBA continuum, each of these parameters alone is usually enough to make the probability of being an impact player in the NBA pretty low. Last year, only 4 seniors were drafted in the first round (McBuckets was the highest senior taken.) Several were taken in the second round (including Cle) but the overwhelming majority of second round picks never play meaningful minutes in the NBA, especially late picks.

    These notions do, in fact, apply to Galloway. He has already beaten the odds by playing even 1 minute in the NBA. However, he is playing in meaningless games on what was a 5-32 team when he got the call. He is auditioning for a different position than he played in college. He is small for a PG and woefully undersized for a 2. One of the main reasons why guys like Langston go undrafted is being undersized for his position, and not skilled enough to move down a position. To me, he looks like the classic tweener, just like Toney Douglas, who actually played PG in college. I would be (pleasantly) shocked if he is ever anything but a 10th-13th guy on even a playoff team, let alone a contender. I’m surprised that anyone here would actually be worried whether we signed him or not.

  32. Draymond Green just tipped in the game tying shot with 1 sec left, tipping it up twice over Noah and Gasol. (Bailing out a terrible shot by Igudala).

    Anybody still not understand his value?

  33. By the way, anyone else notice that renaldo Balkman is tearing up the D League?

    Balkman is just one of those guys that coaches hate. Mike James had a great quote in a recent article about his and Balkman’s current attempts to get back to the NBA by playing in the D-League. They’re both playing well for Dallas’ affiliate. James, on Balkman, noted, “”Here he is, still trying to fight a label.” It is so true. Whenever Balkman played, he played well and yet he never played. Coaches must just have haaaaaated him in practices. The guy did try to fight the entire Filipino Basketball League, so I’m not saying the dude doesn’t have character issues. Just that he also can legitimately play in the NBA (well, he could, at least. I dunno about now at the age of 30).

  34. He is small for a PG and woefully undersized for a 2.

    He is actually not that small for a PG in the nba today. Height wise he is in the range of most Pgs and length wise he out ranks most starting pgs. Measurable wise he is basically a slightly longer Derrick Rose.

  35. Jason Terry only has this year left on his contract I believe, so saves $7M next season on Calderon. It would be a miracle to be able to trade Bargs – that would be a Masai Ujiri special.

  36. Wayne Ellington, he of the Tyson Chandler trade, with 28 points tonight. The gift keeps on giving (to other teams).

  37. Draymond Green just tipped in the game tying shot with 1 sec left, tipping it up twice over Noah and Gasol. (Bailing out a terrible shot by Igudala).

    Anybody still not understand his value?

    I loves me some Draymond Green, but the game-tying bucket sure looked like a loose ball foul to me.

  38. Maybe, but he also got a steal in the closing seconds of OT that the Warriors couldn’t convert. The guy is playing on a level usually reserved for greats. (While people question whether he’s worth more money than Gordon Hayward and/or Chandler Parsons.)

  39. Yep, he’s definitely having one hell of a season. It’ll be really interesting to see what Golden State ends up doing with their salary cap.

  40. Gordon Hayward can ball, very underrated all around player whose shooting has bounced back this year.

  41. He is small for a PG and woefully undersized for a 2….To me, he looks like the classic tweener, just like Toney Douglas, who actually played PG in college. I would be (pleasantly) shocked if he is ever anything but a 10th-13th guy on even a playoff team, let alone a contender. I’m surprised that anyone here would actually be worried whether we signed him or not.

    You might be right about the tweener thing but of course Triangle PG is not the usual definition of a PG. Re: his measurements – if you look at DX’s measurements database he looks to be above average in wingspan for shooting guards and top 20% for PGs. Standing reach would be the other thing that would be important – and he looks to be just below average for SGs and well above average for PGs.

    He’s only 6’1.5″ because it literally looks like his neck is about 2 inches shorter than it should be. It’d be interesting to see where his shoulders line up with other guys.

    The reason I’m bullish on him (especially in comparison with someone like DWTDD) is that he looks like he has a basketball brain on those shoulders. If you watch him on O, he’s always moving when he’s off the ball. When he has the ball he’s always getting guys lined up in the right places, directing traffic. On defense he doesn’t die on screens and understands how far he can be away from someone to cut off the drive while using his long arms to contest etc. — DWTDD’s defining defensive characteristic was dying on screens, followed closely by always getting blown by on D because he’d play up too much.

    In addition LG’s a great rebounder — in a small sample he has the 8th best TRB in the league (PGs) and his rebounding in the D-League was actually a bit better (TRB% 9.0 in D-league vs. 8.6 in NBA) so it’s not like it’s a total outlier for him. In short, he’s exactly the opposite of most of the guards previous regimes have focused on. Hopefully he can keep it going.

  42. “DWTDD’s defining defensive characteristic was dying on screens”
    Actually, I think that it might be more accurate to say, “TDDWTDD’s defining defensive characteristic was crashing into screens shoulder first as if he had no peripheral vision whatsoever and never had any clue that the screener was there.” If Galloway’s upside is 10th man on a playoff team who is occasionally called on to play big minutes because a guy gets hurt and does so competently, that’s a pretty good minimum salary signing.

  43. It’s too small a sample to really know anything, but honestly, why can’t Galloway’s upside be a 5th best player on a good team, a la BJ Armstrong or even past-his-scoring-prime Ron Harper? He’s only played 8 games, true, but 4 of them have been against teams over .500 (Houston, Washington, New Orleans, Milwaukee), and he has basically been a league-average player by some measures (PER 15.9, WS/48 0.094) or above-average by others (WP48 0.150) — all at a minimum salary as a true rookie.

    Granted (and I’ll disclaimer this all the way!) it’s a small sample but he literally has been the 2nd best rookie guard in the league (if you discount Tyler Johnson’s 2 minutes at a WS/48 of 0.882). If you restrict it to rookie guards who have played >200 minutes — there are 18 of them — he comes out as the best rookie guard in WS/48. And by WP48 he is the best rookie guard (again excepting Tyler Johnson’s 2 minutes).

  44. Wayne Ellington, he of the Tyson Chandler trade, with 28 points tonight. The gift keeps on giving (to other teams).

    We traded Ellington for Quincy Acy. Come on, dude.

  45. I can’t tell you how much I like this signing, from multiple perspectives.

    First – I saw him play in the D-league and it’s great to see a guy make it after toiling away in those little gyms.

    Second – we need a good story like this.

    Third – it feels great to see us go back to merit-based play as opposed to contract- (or family!) based play a la JR and Chris Smith.

    Fourth – a guy making good like this from D-League to 10 day contract to 2 year partially guaranteed deal makes it more likely we will be able to attract other guys in a similar situation, like JaMychal Green, whose D-League stats are borderline ridiculous – 63.6 TS on a USG% of 28.2, averaged 26/12/2.8 per 36.

    Finding these guys is how good/great teams are created. Why can’t we be the team that finds the next Danny Green, Patrick Beverley, Wes Matthews, etc. — guys who were overlooked by everyone else?

    (yes I know I’m getting way ahead of myself)

  46. @49

    +1 to all that. I love the underdog story.

    Look, I don’t think Galloway is a great player. I think he has the potential (I said potential) to be a rotation player on a really good team. At this point, he’s a starter on an awful team. He has deficiencies but he has the tools to overcome them. His best attribute at this point in his career is desire.

  47. We traded Ellington for Quincy Acy. Come on, dude.

    We traded Ellington, Tyler, and a 2nd rounder for Acy. Ellington is having a solid season. He’d easily be our best shooting guard if he we had retained him.

    Of all the players involved in the Chandler trade (other than Chandler himself), Ellington has been the best.

    I’m not saying that it matters. Just that it is fitting.

  48. @51 — so you, being a patient Knicks fan who would tolerate a complete tank/5 year rebuild, have concluded already that Early, Thanasis, Acy, and Larkin (who I think will re- sign with the Knicks) have no future on the league?

  49. I agree that he has potential and that it was a no-brainer to sign him to the contract he agreed to. And yeah, it would be great if he turns out to be the next BJ Armstrong, Ron Harper, Wes Matthews, Patrick Beverley, etc.

    But how many times have we seen the next big thing (Fields, Lin, Novak, Copeland, Aldrich, to name a few) regress back to who they really were (at best borderline rotation players) after some initial success?

    I totally agree that we should keep trying to find these guys rather than tie up roster spots with retreads like Amundsen. I just haven’t seen enough from Galloway to get excited, especially since nobody knows who he is yet, i.e. he hasn’t been game-planned for yet.

  50. @53 — I forget which team it was, but one team apparently had on their whiteboard as the #1 key to the game– “stop Langston Galloway .” I guess they didn’t realize that you can’t stop Langston Galloway, you can only hope to contain him…

  51. Ellington is a solid player enjoying the best season of his career. I liked Ellington. Now that he’s playing pretty well, he might actually get a decent deal in free agency. And so he’d be gone next year. Maybe we have a win or two more this season with Ellington? Instead we have Quincy Acy, who is also having a solid season (or at least was having a solid season). Acy is younger, cheaper, and will be on the Knicks for peanuts next year, when we might actually want to win games.

  52. so you, being a patient Knicks fan who would tolerate a complete tank/5 year rebuild, have concluded already that Early, Thanasis, Acy, and Larkin (who I think will re- sign with the Knicks) have no future on the league?

    Nope, I haven’t made that conclusion. The conclusion I’m making is that Phil Jackson hasn’t shown a great head for roster-building thus far and the Tyson Chandler trade is a clear example of it. He made the trade intending to be better in both the long-run and the short run, as I think Brian and others here have proven. Not only did the Chandler trade return an underwhelming portfolio of talent (and increase salary) but the player that would have actually helped the team the most this year was subsequently dumped. And now Phil has the worst team in the entire league on his hands.

    Early, Larkin, Acy, they may turn out to be really good Knicks. I don’t know about the future. What I do know is the present, and the present Knicks are horrible– much worse than Phil intended them to be. And that ain’t good for their future.

  53. But how many times have we seen the next big thing (Fields, Lin, Novak, Copeland, Aldrich, to name a few) regress back to who they really were (at best borderline rotation players) after some initial success?

    Fields got hurt and never recovered. No, he was not as good as he seemed for the first 6 months of his career, but if he didn’t get that nerve damage he’d probably still be solid NBA player. Lin was fine for the Knicks. Novak was good for us for 2 years. Cole, at a minimum, is a fine backup. Those are all good cheap assets. The Knicks have been fucking terrible this season. JR Smith was getting paid 5.5 million bucks to be a sub-borderline rotation player who was too basketball dumb to play the triangle and couldn’t stop going to the club. Getting someone like Langston or Cole or Acy means you don’t have to waste money on shitty veteran players like JR or Jason fucking Smith or so help me god Bargnani.

  54. He made the trade intending to be better in both the long-run and the short run, as I think Brian and others here have proven

    Nobody has proven that. What Phil or any other GM says in public has to be taken with a pretty big grain of salt. I think it’s reasonable to think that, but that’s a long way from proven.

    . Not only did the Chandler trade return an underwhelming portfolio of talent (and increase salary) but the player that would have actually helped the team the most this year was subsequently dumped.

    Who cares? Helped the team do what this year? Suck somewhat less? This season was most likely going to suck from the get go. Phil made some moves that might have worked, but Melo was hurt and JR, Shump et al weren’t playing well or were hurt, and he tried to move on. That’s not a master class of GMing, but aside from the the Melo catastrophe, he hasn’t done anything that bad either.

  55. @56 — we can’t judge whether it was an underwhelming or overwhelming portfolio of talent until we find out what kind of players the four young guys turn out to be, and whether Calderon can either contribute to a good team next year or be traded for some other asset (either player of pick). Aren’t you one of the guys who is always advocating for accumulating 2nd round draft picks? Well, Acy, Larkin, Early, Thanasis and Galloway are exactly the type of guys that you get with 2nd round picks — i.e., guys who have shown some talent who might develop into very good players, or might turn out to be stiffs.

  56. But how many times have we seen the next big thing (Fields, Lin, Novak, Copeland, Aldrich, to name a few) regress back to who they really were (at best borderline rotation players) after some initial success?

    I would argue that we are precisely looking for the next Novak/Copeland/Fields — ie. someone who is doing exactly what they should be doing but doing it in the right situation.

    No one is asking Galloway to be Chris Paul and have the ball in his hands 90% of the time. We’re not asking him to be Jeremy Lin in a D’Antoni offense and have a usage of 30. We’re asking him to run the offense, shoot the ball when he’s open, and play defense. That’s exactly what he does. What seems to be a good thing about Galloway is that he doesn’t have a glaring weakness in his game. We’re not robbing Peter to pay Paul every time he goes in the game. That was always the problem with Cope and Novak. The problem with Landry Fields is that he completely forgot how to shoot the ball, and that’s a problem as a “shooting guard”.

  57. It seems the issue/debate re: Galloway is being muddled a bit. Lin, Novak, Fields, Copeland, Aldrich…are all fine players to have on your team…for the right price. Lin as a back up PG at a few million a year is not bad. Lin at 8 or 15 million is a burden. Same with Fields or Novak. Galloway is still young (yes 4 years in college but I hate how this has now become a knock on a player) and he seems to play decent enough defense and is hungry. For what Phil signed him for he’s a steal and we should all be psyched that we found this guy and are gonna have him next year for cheap. Compared to JR or Shump or Hardaway, he’s a bargain and he could be better (or at least more consistent) than any of those guys. He’s never gonna have the offense JR has (when JR is on) but so far he seems to be at least comparable to Shump on D while being better than him on offense. If he and Hardaway can both develop and improve, well we have our SG rotation locked down next year. At the very least it makes Hardaway more expendable if we want to move him to make room for a FA at the SG spot.

    I hate that we let Novak, Lin (and even Fields) go. We overpaid for Novak but we also were pretty successful when he was playing for us. Lin and Fields we let go for nothing. I want us to keep and develop young guys. Good for Galloway.

  58. Well, Mr. Galloway will get a real test on defense tonight trying to slow down Westbrook. Sounds like Durant is out so Galloway will presumably be guarding the #1 option.

  59. I went to the Knicks D league game Saturday night against Texas and saw Balkman play. He’s the same player. He hustled really hard, dove for the ball, fought for rebounds etc… but has little to no offensive skills.

  60. Y’all diss Landry, but he’s shooting 50% from downtown this season. Factorial.

    Dude is sick. He has missed only one three all season! But in his defense (some of ) we were not the only people to drink the Kool Aid. Spike Lee took to wearing his jersey. He was more than just the hero of the basement dwelling esoteric stat geek.

  61. I still think Landry would have been a decent pro without that nerve injury. And Balkman always had the physical tools be a rotation player, but he’s a fucking lunatic who can’t lay off the reefer. Projecting players is tough!

  62. Yeah, I think the nerve injury pretty much took Fields off the table as a topic of debate. How do you debate how a guy would have ended up when he has a nerve injury in his hand that has completely ruined his ability to shoot?

  63. I have no doubt that Balkman could outplay a ton of guys currently in the NBA, given the chance. I loved watching him play. I can think of few players who reminded me more of the Riley Knicks glory days. He’s kind of a slim Anthony Mason. He played amazing defense for half a season and was actually very efficient in a low usage role given his reputation as having no offensive skills.

    I would love to have him back on the Knicks but there is no chance of that happening.

    Re Lin, Novak, Fields, etc, if you can get an average or near average NBA player for a little more than a minimum that’s great. If you overpay for that production it’s not so great. There is no way paying 800K for Galloway can be an overpay so I don’t really see what the issue is.

  64. Re Lin, Novak, Fields, etc, if you can get an average or near average NBA player for a little more than a minimum that’s great. If you overpay for that production it’s not so great. There is no way paying 800K for Galloway can be an overpay so I don’t really see what the issue is.

    +1

  65. Re Lin, Novak, Fields, etc, if you can get an average or near average NBA player for a little more than a minimum that’s great. If you overpay for that production it’s not so great. There is no way paying 800K for Galloway can be an overpay so I don’t really see what the issue is.

    It’s a complicated issue, as the debate seems to clearly have moved on past whether this signing was good or not. Everyone seems to agree on that (that it was a good signing). The debate, instead, has moved on to a couple of different arguments that basically revolve around the following notion: It wouldn’t be a big deal if the Knicks did lose Galloway (or perhaps better expressed – Galloway hasn’t proven himself as a player we should care about one way or the other yet). That’s not my position, but that seems to be the heart of this debate, not whether it was a good idea to sign Galloway to this deal or not.

  66. Re Fields, my recollection was that he was shooting poorly before we let him walk.

    He did shoot poorly in year two after shooting great in year one, but I believe the injury was already there (note that he had his first surgery right after coming to Toronto). I mean, nerve damage in your shooting elbow? That just sounds insane. And then he also injured his wrist in Toronto!! Luckily for him, he at least made a ton of money while he could. Amusingly enough, he’s shooting much better this year – but almost all of it is right at the rim.

  67. I’m not keen on Phil’s fixation with cap space this summer.

    The point is to get good players, right? You need them up and down the roster. If you could sign a decent bottom end guy now for $800k why quibble over $300k? Does he really think he can fill out an entire roster out of one year’s free agency class? You have to have something here.

    I get the feeling that if Phil could acquire a decent player now who cut into the cap space this summer, he’d decline. And that just doesn’t make sense to me. We should be giving every D-League outperformer a chance to earn the same contract Galloway just earned.

  68. Gordon Hayward can ball, very underrated all around player whose shooting has bounced back this year.

    The last vestige of the Stephon Marbury trade.

  69. I think the only plausible explaination to this tight fixation with salary cap is that Phil thinks he has for sure aces up his sleeve. 300k are never the difference, unless you already did the math and have to count every penny.

  70. hinkie, morey and other gms have been able to get their 2nd rounders to accept non guaranteed 2nd years… he was ufa so it’s understandable that he was balking at paying above market rate for a guy who’s had 8 decent games…

    i don’t think jackson was serious about letting him go… and if galloway was serious about having the 2nd year fully guaranteed.. which apparently he wasn’t… i’m sure he would have signed him.. he had way too much to lose which is why they budged and gave him a partial…

  71. I mean what the hell are we even talking about. Galloway signed and we preserved cap space with the partial guarantee right? So that’s a mutually beneficial deal.

    Also I think if he was offered a good player he like he’d probably consider it even if cut into cap space. I assume that getting Calderon in the Chandler trade demonstrates that, even if that looks like a mistake in player evaluation right now.

  72. Ephus — if you are out there today — I seem to remember reading somewhere that any player on a minimum contract counts the same as a cap hold (i.e., about 500k) against the cap. The rationale is that the union doesn’t want teams favoring rookies on minimum contracts over veterans on more expensive minimum contracts. If that’s the case, Galloway on an 800k minimum contract counts no more that 500 k. Am I misremembering ?

  73. hinkie, morey and other gms have been able to get their 2nd rounders to accept non guaranteed 2nd years… he was ufa so it’s understandable that he was balking at paying above market rate for a guy who’s had 8 decent games…

    Teams have more leverage with second round picks, since they control their rights. Undrafted free agents can sign anywhere.

  74. Ephus — if you are out there today — I seem to remember reading somewhere that any player on a minimum contract counts the same as a cap hold (i.e., about 500k) against the cap. The rationale is that the union doesn’t want teams favoring rookies on minimum contracts over veterans on more expensive minimum contracts. If that’s the case, Galloway on an 800k minimum contract counts no more that 500 k. Am I misremembering ?

    That only applies to players in the league three years or more (and there, only guys on one-year deals or less), but even there, the cap hit is the second year minimum, not the first year minimum. So you’d still be giving up $300,000 in cap space even if the player was eligible.

  75. blah, just edited my original post and it all got deleted except for that last sentence.

    Well here’s the cliffs notes version –

    If you could sign a decent bottom end guy now for $800k why quibble over $300k?

    Not paying attention to details is the same strategy that resulted in us trading 1236 draft picks for Barfnani and throwing in Mozgov to Denver. Who knows if $300K will make the difference or not, but why throw it away if you don’t have to?

    Phil knew for sure that he was dealing from a position of considerable strength in regards to contract negotiations with Galloway. 1 – Kid was undrafted and is living out his dream at MSG — so immediately he has emotional ties to the organization. Can’t underestimate that. 2 – he got his chance specifically because he played so well within the Triangle construct – who knows if he would play as well somewhere else? 3 — he was able to make the most of his chance because he went to a team that had 28 min/night to give him. 4 — he was probably only making somewhere between $13K-19K/season in the D-league, and Phil was offering him $250K guaranteed this year and ~$300K next? There is no chance Galloway is turning that down to try to get all $800K guaranteed. And it’s not like he has no chance of making the full $800K – he just has to keep playing well.

  76. On this forum the Galloway debate has been very reasonable. We all agree there’s no way it was a bad signing. The only point I’ve been making is that I’ve sensed a certain level of hype about his upside in some articles and on twitter. I think that’s wildly premature because he doesn’t have significant PG skills, he’s undersized for a SG, and he’s athletic, but not wildly athletic. Those tweeners tend to disappoint longer term. As some have pointed out, he’s very long (which is something I didn’t even realize until I read it here). So maybe that will offset it and give him a better chance to become more than backup. I just think Knicks fans in general are so desperate for an upside surprise, they tend to get ahead of themselves after just a handful of games. It’s going to get tougher on him now that teams are getting to see him.

  77. By the way, it was fun watching Thanasis Antetokounmpo play live for the Westchester Knicks Saturday night. The best part was that he and Balkman were trash talking back and forth all game.

    A few weeks ago I thought it made sense to bring him up and let him play in the NBA because there was no downside for the Knicks. Now that I’ve seen him play, I don’t think he’s ready. He’s athletic, works hard on the court etc… but I I didn’t sense he was some kind of lock down defender, elite rebounder, or anything else in the non scoring areas that might make up for his limited offense. He showed flashes that he’s capable of becoming better on offense, but I don’t think he’s ready.

  78. If Phil is making mistakes as a GM so far, and he probably is, they are so much smaller than the mistakes previous GMs made, it’s refreshing.

    don’t mind that he didn’t say yes right away to Galloway. He probably made Dolan happy, but even if Dolan didn’t notice, sometimes little bits of money make a difference, so it’s better he saved the $300K

  79. By the way, it was fun watching Thanasis Antetokounmpo play live for the Westchester Knicks Saturday night. The best part was that he and Balkman were trash talking back and forth all game.

    A few weeks ago I thought it made sense to bring him up and let him play in the NBA because there was no downside for the Knicks. Now that I’ve seen him play, I don’t think he’s ready. He’s athletic, works hard on the court etc… but I I didn’t sense he was some kind of lock down defender, elite rebounder, or anything else in the non scoring areas that might make up for his limited offense. He showed flashes that he’s capable of becoming better on offense, but I don’t think he’s ready.

    yeah i saw him a few weeks back (actually one of Galloway’s last games in westchester!) and thought the same thing. He had a couple awesome blocks but also got burned a few times. His jumper looks totally inconsistent. Right now he’s looking sort of, well, Balkman, to be honest. He plays super-hard, is really athletic, and literally has no idea what he’s doing.

    I really do hope that our coaches in the D-league can develop him though — because I think it’s fair to say he’s the only one left on that team that looks like he could ever make his mark in the NBA. I guess that’s what happens when you trade all your 2nd round picks forever.

Comments are closed.