Knicks Morning News (2015.03.08)

  • [New York Post] Fisher cops to talks of giving Greek rookie spot on Knicks (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 01:21:03 -0400)

    Knicks coach Derek Fisher said it's out of his hands whether to fill the open roster spot but admitted their unsigned second-round pick, shooting guard Thanasis Antetokounmpo, continues to be…

  • [New York Post] Harsh reality Knicks face as top-flight free agent already says no (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 00:44:09 -0400)

    Marc Gasol apparently has inflicted the first dose of the harsh reality Knicks fans could face more of during the offseason. Big-name players aren't necessarily going to be in a…

  • [New York Daily News] Paul George eyes return as Pacers beat Knicks, 92-86 (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 06:44:22 GMT)

    The Knicks don’t have much going for them presently. But by George, the Pacers just might have something here.

  • [New York Daily News] Bondy: Knicks give us plenty to laugh about (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 05:52:46 GMT)

    “Knock, knock.” “Who’s there?” “Tim Hardaway.” “Tim Hardaway who?” “Tim, is there a Hard-a-way to make a living?”

  • [New York Times] Duke 84, North Carolina 77: Freshman Guard Leads Duke to a Sweep of North Carolina (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 04:31:03 GMT)

    Tyus Jones scored 24 points to propel the No. 3 Blue Devils to a road win over the No. 19 Tar Heels.

  • [New York Times] Harden Scores 28, Rockets Beat Nuggets 114-100 (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:54:46 GMT)

    James Harden scored 28 points, Corey Brewer had 24 and the Houston Rockets snapped a three-game road losing streak by beating the Denver Nuggets 114-100 on Saturday night

  • [New York Times] Timberwolves Snap Blazers’ Win Streak With 121-113 Victory (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:42:45 GMT)

    Kevin Martin scored 29 points and Ricky Rubio hit a big 3-pointer with a minute left to help the Minnesota Timberwolves snap a four-game skid with a 121-113 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Saturday night.

  • [New York Times] Lowly 76ers Surprise Short-Handed Hawks 92-84 (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:24:46 GMT)

    Hollis Thompson and Luc Mbah a Moute scored 19 points apiece, and the Philadelphia 76ers surprised the short-handed Atlanta Hawks 92-84 on Saturday night.

  • [New York Times] Evans Leads Pelicans to 95-89 Comeback Win Over Grizzlies (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:21:44 GMT)

    The Pelicans thought Tyreke Evans was being unselfish to a fault, and they told him so at halftime as they pondered how to overcome a double-digit deficit against one of the best teams in the NBA.

  • [New York Times] Pacers 92, Knicks 86: Andrea Bargnani Is Cheered in One More Knicks Loss to Mock (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:20:34 GMT)

    Bargnani, who may not be in a Knicks uniform next season, has become the team’s go-to guy of late, but it wasn’t enough against the Pacers.

  • [New York Times] Middleton Scores 30 Points, Bucks Hold Off Wizards 91-85 (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:12:46 GMT)

    Khris Middleton scored 30 points and hit a key 3-pointer from the corner with 40.8 seconds left, and the Milwaukee Bucks snapped a four-game losing streak with a 91-85 victory over the Washington Wizards on Saturday night.

  • [New York Times] Pacers Win Fifth in a Row, Beat Knicks 92-86 (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:09:48 GMT)

    Rodney Stuckey scored 17 points, George Hill made the tiebreaking 3-pointer with 2:34 left, and the Indiana Pacers beat the New York Knicks 92-86 on Saturday night for their season-best fifth straight victory.

  • [New York Times] LeBron James Ties Cavs’ Career Assists Record (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:03:56 GMT)

    LeBron James tied Cleveland’s career assists record and scored 17 points in the Cavaliers’ 89-79 victory over the Phoenix Suns on Saturday night.

  • [New York Times] N.B.A. Roundup: Cavs Win 13th Straight at Home (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:03:29 GMT)

    LeBron James tied Cleveland’s career assists record and scored 17 points Saturday as the Cavaliers beat Phoenix.

  • [New York Times] Heat Rally Again and Top Kings in OT, 114-109 (Sun, 08 Mar 2015 03:01:15 GMT)

    Dwyane Wade scored 28 points, Tyler Johnson added 24 and the Miami Heat erased a 12-point, fourth-quarter deficit to beat the Sacramento Kings 114-109 in overtime Saturday night.

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    Mike Kurylo

    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    76 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2015.03.08)”

    1. So apparently the Knicks are open to trading their pick (or rather making the pick for another team and then trading the player), according to ESPN. I really hope that’s just them doing their due diligence to see if NO wants to trade Anthony Davis for Okafor or Towns.

      To that end I have a question for my fellow Knickbloggerians: Assuming we get a top 2 pick, who would you be willing to trade it for? And by trade I mean make the pick for the other team before making the trade, of course.

    2. Aside from Anthony Davis? No one.

      Unless it’s a current great player [eg Harden] plus future picks.

      Which it wouldn’t be.

    3. Owen March 7, 2015 at 11:42 pm

      The ignominy of this season and the excellence of the posting here tonight will echo in eternity. Literally laughed so hard I teared up a little…

      Making jokes about how awful the Knicks are is a big part of what we do here….

      I would pay money for the DRed and Kahnzy show on every thread.

    4. I dont want to trade the pick for anyone, but I might consider trading down the draft for more picks. If we traded #1 to 76ers for #3 and #6 (if the Lakers miss out the top 5) might turn OK.

      Anyway, i don’t know enough of the prospects to say what’s better.

    5. Trading a pick for an established player like Anthony Davis (best-case scenario) is not smart because we are essentially trying to assemble a team through free agency alone, and that has proven impossible to this day. All top teams have at least one home-grown star. There is simply not enough money to put a decent roster together without some cheap, young and good players.

      Mostly, I agree with you. The CBA pretty much forces any contending team to get above market value production from players on relatively cheap rookie contracts.

      But you’re honestly saying that if you were GM and NO called you up asking about an Okafor (or whoever) for Davis deal, you’d turn them down? That’d be like someone offering you $100 million for your as yet unscratched scratch off lotto ticket and you saying “no thanks, I like my chances.”

      Well, maybe that’s a bit extreme but you get the idea. One’s a sure thing, bonafide superstar, while the other can be, maybe, possibly, we’ll see.

    6. Trading a pick for an established player like Anthony Davis (best-case scenario) is not smart because we are essentially trying to assemble a team through free agency alone, and that has proven impossible to this day.

      Oh man, we would be so screwed if traded our pick for the arguably best player in the NBA, whose rookie contract doesnt end till 2016, by the way. Soooooo screwed!

    7. I wouldn’t trade Towns for anyone except Davis or Durant. I would trade Mudiay, Russell, Johnson, Cauley-Stein, etc. in a heartbeat for Kawhi Leonard or Cousins to give a couple of examples. Okafor is the most vexing case. Consider:

      (1) Spurs offer Kawhi Leonard
      (2) Spurs offer Kawhi and Patty Mills (on 3 year deal 3.5m/year)
      (3) Spurs offer Kawhi Leonard, Patty Mills, and agree to take Calderon’s contract

      Would you take any of the above offers?

    8. It essentially amounts to giving up the top pick in exchange for the rights to get these players in free agency.

      In the case of Okafor, the Spurs would match a 15.8m max offer if Knicks refuse trade. And Kawhi and Patty Mills would total only about 20m against the cap.

    9. So, to me, the question becomes: how useful would Anthony Davis be for the Knicks right now? In our current condition, not much beyond elevating the team to mediocre level. Anthony Davis would be far more valuable to Houston or Cleveland, for example. Those teams would have a much greater incentive to do the trade.

      If Davis were older, and thus getting paid more, I could see your point. However he’s only 21 and still on his rookie contract. He may not put us over the top right now (and no one player would at the moment), but he’d be one helluva player to build on. Once Melo’s contract expires, he’s still only 26 and in his prime (assuming we’d resign him). So while he may not be too useful right now in our quest for a championship, I’d still rather have him to build around once Melo’s gone than not. Plus, maybe Melo gets butthurt and demands his trade to the Lakers.

      This, of course, is purely fantastical conjecture as you’re right; NO would in no way consider dealing Davis. Unless, of course, his legacy kid wins her suit against him and gains control of the Pelicans, then all bets are off. Doubtful, but it could happen.

    10. Trading a pick for an established player like Anthony Davis (best-case scenario) is not smart because we are essentially trying to assemble a team through free agency alone, and that has proven impossible to this day.

      Oh man, i am not talking NO here. You said it’s impossible for the knicks to build a contender trading our picks for Davis. I mean, it’s utterly laughable. Even if we don’t become contenders overnight, Davis will be a top player for the next 8 years, and thanks to RFA, he would be a knick for 5 of those 8 years.

      I mean, it is still possible to screw over; but having one of the top 3 players of the NBA gives you so much advantage, that even if you surround them with garbage (see Lebron in Cleveland before Miami) you are bound to be good. We would not have to do wonders in FA, we would just need not to screw it over (not to sign the next Eric Gordon, Gilbert Arenas, etc.)

    11. Trading our pick is a win-now move. We have no right whatsoever to be in win-now mode. That’s the essence of my argument.

      For the most part, I agree. I just think it depends on who we’re trading the pick for.

    12. Kirk Heinrich is third all-time for most games played as a Bull…really? I’d have lost that round of sports trivia.

    13. Those two guys would cost the Knicks some 30M per year. Now you have Melo, Leonard and Mills and no young players, draft picks or cap space.

      How do they cost $30m per year when Leonard and Mills would make $19.2m at most between them.
      Also, I do not believe you can sign and trade RFAs anyway. I do wonder if teams can renounce their rights to a RFA then S&T them?

      Re: Davis
      N.O. can take the #1 and the 2018# 1(protected). He is perfect for winning now and winning in the future. He is the definition of a win-win, I just looked it up and it had a picture of the uni-brow.

      P.S.

      That would be an amazing summer though the Knicks trading for Davis and picking up Leonard because the Spurs didn’t match because it goes against their principles. They would even have money to spare to fill out more of the roster.

    14. It bears repeating that the Davis scenario is just something I plucked out of thin air to fantasize about. It has absolutely no basis in reality. The point of the question was to discuss the possibility of the Knicks trading away the pick and who, if anyone, you’d be happy to get for it.

    15. Tony Parker been in Miami lately?

      One of the most consistently underrated PG’s in the league.

    16. Yours is a very valid question. I’ll try to answer the best I can: I don’t value players on their pure production alone. This is the key consideration for me when talking about trades, contracts, etc.

      So, to me, the question becomes: how useful would Anthony Davis be for the Knicks right now? In our current condition, not much beyond elevating the team to mediocre level. Anthony Davis would be far more valuable to Houston or Cleveland, for example. Those teams would have a much greater incentive to do the trade.

      So, my position has to be understood within the context of the Knicks needing far more than Anthony Davis in order to justify mortgaging the future in exchange for mediocrity. It actually has very little to do with Anthony Davis himself. It’s the same reason I have always opposed re-signing Melo to a max deal: we have very little use for his services (most Melo fanboys don’t understand this and think I just hate him).

      In other words, I believe the team needs to be built before we spend all the cap money on a few players that would definitely make a difference, but not enough. We are paying for the sins of the past and there won’t be an easy path to redemption. It will take time, effort and a lot of discipline and long-term vision. Trading our first round is a short-term move. I believe taking a risk (yes, our pick could be a bust) by keeping our pick will always be a safer, better bet: we can always get a big name in free agency.

      Next time you win $100 on a scratch-off, I’d like to trade you my unscratched $5. You could win $200 on it!

      Anthony Davis is what you want every draft pick to become. Seriously, if I drafted a #1 and he gave me half of what David produces, I’d be satisfied. Paying him on a 25% max contract is no problem at all. He is the kind of player you WANT to pay a max contract to.

      Yes, bargains on rookie contracts are great; I am maybe the most vocal proponent of 2nd round picks on this board. But the #1 pick could be a bust. Anthony Davis is not a bust, and barring injury, will have a Garnett-like reputation for the next ten years.

    17. Trading the #1 for #3 and #6 would be a great trade for a team in the Knicks situation. It could be a franchise saver. I hope that scenario develops.

    18. I generally don’t I want to trade our pick for an expensive player, even if he’s worth the money. You need good players on Rookie contracts to enable enough talent on the team along with free agents without hitting the salary cap. If we trade our pick for a player under contract we cut into our cap space.

    19. Trading the pick is my worst case scenario bc the Knicks are not getting Davis. For some reason I keep thinking Aldridge in a sign & trade which would be awful. I just have a bad feeling about phil’s intentions as I don’t think he’s in this for the long haul.

    20. @ 18 – so agree. The rub is that Phil & melo are in win now mode while the Knicks should not be. That is the thing that worries me.

    21. Trading the pick would be a disaster for the organization. A disaster. The Knicks would be crippling their future for a tiny short term gain (EC semifinals)

    22. If you get cousins you’re trading the pick + whatever FA you can get w $ for cousins. It’s a tough choice.

    23. So would people trade the number one pick for Cousins and their first round pick?

      I like Cousins…I just don’t think I’d like him in New York. I’d really prefer we stopped bringing in those “if he ever gets his head right” kind of players. So I have to say no to that idea.

      the #1 for the #3 and #6 though? That would be mighty tempting, especially if Towns somehow, miraculously, fell to us in the #3 spot.

    24. If we can get Towns I do not want to trade the pick at all unless its for Anthony Davis, which is not going to happen. I’m just wondering what people would be willing to trade Towns for besides AD. Cousins IS a good player and his max is not gonna be that bad. Towns could be a bust.

      I do not want to do this because I agree that keeping a potential franchise player on a rookie contract could correct a lot of the mistakes this organization has made the last 15 years. But Cousins plus a draft pick (from a non playoff team) would make me pause.

    25. Exactly. Having an impact player on a rookie contract gives you so much salary flexibility. I would hate to give that up.

    26. Boogie Cousins has a hard enough time staying out of trouble in Sacramento (I used to live there, it’s really not that hard). I think he’d just implode in New York and go the way of Larry Sanders.

    27. Is it a more likely scenario Philly trades the #3 and #6 picks or that they trade the #3 and Embiid?

    28. Interesting debate. I think that it is funny that it all started with a “scoop” from Brian Windhorst (!) that the Knicks are “considering all options.” Here’s what his scoop should have been — “My sources tell me that the Knicks and every other team in all of pro sports are considering all of their options leading into their drafts because that is what every competent front office does.” Jackson would be derelict in his duties if he weren’t doing his due diligence regarding every single possible scenario.

    29. Boogie Cousins has a hard enough time staying out of trouble in Sacramento (I used to live there, it’s really not that hard).

      Has he been in trouble off the court in Sac town? What kind of problems have he been having?

    30. Hell no I would not trade our pick for Boogie. Cousins is a very talented player who hasn’t put it together yet. Cousins might develop into a terrific player, but so might our pick, and our pick will be cheaper

    31. @ 52 – I lean that way too. Say Knicks got 5th pick though, I would think about it though ultimately probably pass.

    32. Has he been in trouble off the court in Sac town? What kind of problems have he been having?

      I wrote that poorly. Off-court he hasn’t had any issues that I know of. He does have a giant ego though, and that’s what gets him into trouble with his team. I just think that issue would be magnified in NY with the media and hype surrounding the players and team all the time.

    33. if the knicks have #1 .. any realistic trade scenarios.. including trading down would be disastrous… towns is separating himself from the others and trading him for anyone other than anthony davis / durant would be a mistake of epic proportions… yes that includes trading him for russell or okafor…

      if we have #2 trading down to 3 isn’t bad…. but trading out of the top 3 altogether for someone like kawhi leonard would be horrible… even trading a top 6 pick in this draft would be horrible…. you can get guys like kawhi leonard… i would argue there are a few guys like him in this draft…

    34. Kawhi Leonard is one of the 10 best players in the NBA. I’m not sure what you mean when you say there are a few guys like him in this draft. You mean kids with cornrows?

    35. i’m sorry kawhi leonard is not one of the 10 best players in the nba… he’s good… but how good can a SF be when he doesn’t create shots for others and score with volume and efficiency?

    36. Watching Russell and Kaminsky right now. Russ is just so smooth. At times he does get a little too loose with his dribble though. I would like to see Kaminsky exploit his match up more

    37. Okafor…….Middleton/Antetokounmpo (Giannis)

      Also, I do not believe you can sign and trade RFAs anyway. I do wonder if teams can renounce their rights to a RFA then S&T them?

      I don’t know if they changed this but remember RFA Landry Fields to LA for Nash? Toronto jumped in and Landry signed the offer sheet. So long as the RFA doesn’t sign an offer sheet with another team, I think it’s possible. Or RFA could sign NYK offer sheet right away, team refuses to match and then pick sent in separate transaction. So long as RFA wants to play for NYK, I think it happens.

    38. I would be fine trading the #1 pick for Cousins and the Sacramento first. Yes you lose out on the first pick, but you get Cousins locked up long-term on a relatively cheap contract with the cap set to jump after next season and you get yourself a lottery pick in this draft as well. Cousins is also only 24 and has improved year after year in the league.

      His issues are basically that the Kings are fucking stupid and fired the first decent coach they’ve had in his time there after Westphal and Smart collected some paychecks for alienating the entire roster and producing zero tangible improvement in the team’s play. Cousins has some terrible body language at times, but he’s matured a lot since he entered the league. His biggest issue is decision making, but I think much of that is a function of having to create most of his own offense as well as for others as basically the primary playmaker on the team.

      All that being said I totally understand why people would not make that trade, particularly if you think whoever’s going to be available to the Knicks at their pick is going to be an absolute stud.

    39. If we got the #1 and Philly offered Embiid and #6, I’d have to consider that.

      I’ve watched Russell a few times and have concerns about consistency, that jumper comes and goes.

      Kaminsky is a very, very good offensive player and smart decision maker, but man does he look weak physically for his size.

    40. Basically, there are two loopholes in the system to get great value: rookie contracts, and the very short list of elite players. Lebron, KD, and AD that are worth far more than their max contracts.

      However, No contract can be judged by talent alone. Every contract has a value of ’player talent vs salary’. If I was GM, I’d have a board that rated every player against their salary. That’s the only real way to get an edge and put a strong roster together. (on a side note, that’s where advanced analytics can be very useful)

      For that reason, it can conceivably make sense to trade a#1 for a #3 and #6 (you get two underpriced players instead of one). But, if that #1 turns into a super elite player, the long term consequences can come back to haunt you.

      Overall, even though I’m opposed to trading our #1, it was smart of Phil to float it out there to see if there was a deal that made sense, or otherwise, just to shake the bushes and generate communication with other GM’s.

    41. Yes you lose out on the first pick, but

      “Yes, there are plenty of safe, reliable cars out there for sale, but–”

      Cousins has some terrible body language at times, but

      “Sure, this one’s been in three major accidents, a fender bender, and a flood, but–”

      His biggest issue is decision making, but

      “Okay, the car has a blown transmission and no engine whatsoever, but–“

    42. Cousins would be a superstar if not for shot selection and turnovers, problems caused by coaching and playing with bad teammates. I’ve heard this song before.

    43. If the Knicks trade their draft pick for anything other than a very good player and another very good draft pick, (excluding the fantasy nonsense like Anthony Davis) we should immediately move away from discussing the team and Phil Jackson and onto the 2020 rebuild and who the next GM will be.

    44. ““Sure, this one’s been in three major accidents, a fender bender, and a flood, but–”
      ….
      Okay, the car has a blown transmission and no engine whatsoever, but–“

      Yeah, but I always wanted a Porsche.

    45. Now, if I was Boston, or one of those other teams with loads of picks, I could see dealing for Cousins. If he doesn’t sort his shit out, well, you still have lots of picks coming. And he is going to score points, and you will be able to trade him again for something valuable. We have Melo’s bad deal and no picks next year, so if Cousins doesn’t hit, we’re boned.

    46. @63. Exactly. I’d feel more comfortable with you as the GM than anyone that has run the Knicks in years.

    47. Jowles I’m amazed body language even matters to you since it’s not something that can be captured in a box score.

      Look at Cousins’ numbers year after year. The guy is a very good player and his defensive aptitude has improved drastically in his time in the NBA. Sacramento is an absolute train wreck when he’s off the floor and pretty damn good when he’s playing.

      Sac ORtg with Cousins on the floor: 106.4
      Sac ORtg with Cousins off the floor: 102.3

      Sac DRtg with Cousins on the floor: 104.7
      Sac DRtg with Cousins off the floor: 113.4

      Out of the top-14 players on their team this year in terms of minutes played he’s the only one with a DRtg under 106 with an individual DRtg of 101, but hey since he’s a human and gets pissed about stupid management decisions and because WP/48 says that he sucks who cares. Cousins isn’t a saint and he obviously has flaws, but he also does a lot of really good things on the floor.

      Like I said I can understand why you wouldn’t want to make the trade but every single GM in the league would at the minimum seriously consider a No. 1 pick for Cousins and Sacramento’s lottery pick this year. Also I wouldn’t dream of making this trade if we don’t get their pick this year in addition to Cousins.

    48. For that reason, it can conceivably make sense to trade a#1 for a #3 and #6 (you get two underpriced players instead of one). But, if that #1 turns into a super elite player, the long term consequences can come back to haunt you.

      Would you trade the No. 1 pick for Embiid and the No. 6 Philly pick?

    49. Would you trade the No. 1 pick for Embiid and the No. 6 Philly pick?

      I wouldn’t. I know the guy has the potential to be a stud, but big men with foot (feet?) problems rarely work out.

    50. I wouldn’t. I know the guy has the potential to be a stud, but big men with foot (feet?) problems rarely work out.

      How about if they gave up the No. 3 pick?

      If I knew Towns was there at 3 and that offer was on the table I’d take it.

    51. If I knew Towns was there at 3 and that offer was on the table I’d take it.

      Since I’d pick Towns with the #1, yeah I’d take it too if I could be reasonably certain he’d still be available at #3.

    52. Super Saiyan Russel (good nickname DRed) with another triple double. I’ll admit it, I fully expected him to fall on his face without KD. Guy’s been playing out of his mind.

    53. There’s no question that Cousins is capable of becoming a great player. The problem is the extra risk you take on with an immature less than stable player. I’d bet that at some point he’s going to have a borderline MVP season but do something incredibly boneheaded to blow a playoff series by getting multiple techs early in a critical game, by starting a fight and getting suspended etc.. We need to move away from players like this.

    54. There’s no question that Cousins is capable of becoming a great player. The problem is the extra risk you take on with an immature less than stable player. I’d bet that at some point he’s going to have a borderline MVP season but do something incredibly boneheaded to blow a playoff series by getting multiple techs early in a critical game, by starting a fight and getting suspended etc.. We need to move away from players like this.

      That’s completely understandable. I’d be willing to roll the dice because I think he has all the skills to really thrive within the Triangle, but obviously there is risk there which you outlined well.

      Also in general I want to say that everybody on this board (even you hoola and capn luke who I flipped out on Friday) contribute a lot of great stuff and challenge me to look at things from perspectives I may not have considered before.

    55. I don’t do on/off numbers. They are the very definition of noise. If you think offensive rebounding is noisy, how about the whole “player A’s value relative to his backups, not relative to league-average production” game? C’mon. We don’t have time for this on-off nonsense. I don’t know whether Boogie has been backed up by a stud or not over the course of his career. If he were backed up by Hassan Whiteside, we might not be having this conversation at all, because Whiteside is nasty-good and most backup big men are not. Cousins is not terrible, but he’s not worth a #1 pick. There are plenty of GMs (I imagine Hinkie, Ainge, Buford and that idiot down in Houston) who would not take Cousins on a rookie contract at #1 this year, because he is not particularly efficient at playing the basketball game.

      I mean, we should be focussing our efforts on getting DRed in the GM’s chair after Jackson resigns Bargnani for $8-10M a year, citing “size” and “athleticism” in tandem.

      I mean really, if you’re going to trade the #1 pick, it’s gotta be for a proven star. I wouldn’t necessarily trade it for Kevin Love (and I love Love), but players like Durant and Davis immediately turn your team into a playoff contender.

    56. I mean really, if you’re going to trade the #1 pick, it’s gotta be for a proven star. I wouldn’t necessarily trade it for Kevin Love (and I love Love), but players like Durant and Davis immediately turn your team into a playoff contender.

      No one is stupid enough to trade a guaranteed elite player for a possible elite player.

      If you are willing to move a top pick, you might get back a VERY good player and a very good pick. A scenario like that might be feasible if the other side of the trade was very hot for a specific player in the draft and needed your pick, but you rated that player similar or .equal to another one that would still be available a couple of notches lower. Then you get your player + help fill out the roster with the very good player.

    57. One good thing in that article is that Knicks management has been at 20 of the 30 Kentucky games this season. That bodes favorably for the Towns choice in the draft if we get the opportunity to pick first. I am in the camp that they would at least speculate with other teams to see what someone would give up for the Okafor/Towns slot in the draft. We should twitter bomb Phil if they get the #1 pick not to trade the damn thing though.

    58. Yeah, substitute Embiid for the #3 pick in the above scenario and I’d still do it. That’s a reasonable risk with extremely high reward ( plus another 1st rounder). I imagine I’m in the minority here, but anything that nets the team more chances at hitting gold is worth the # 1 pick. The Knicks have painted themselves into a corner, and it will take luck to get out of it no matter what.

    59. What about this:

      Philly gets Knicks #1

      Knicks get Embiid, Heat’s 2015 1st rounder (currently #16) and Sixers 2nd rounder (currently #32)

      I say yes. (These Sixer scenarios are actually quite fun to consider:)

    60. Also in general I want to say that everybody on this board (even you hoola and capn luke who I flipped out on Friday) contribute a lot of great stuff and challenge me to look at things from perspectives I may not have considered before.

      I love you, too, lavor, . . . like a family member I can’t agree with.

    61. Would you trade our projected top pick Patrick Ewing to proven NBA stars like Charles Barkley? Moses Malone? Kevin Mchale?
      My ans is NO.

      We keep on comparing talent per talent but the fact is trading for a proven star will do more harm to our franchise. We have the cap space and there is high probability that we can get a player with the caliber of Cousins, Kawhi in the free agency. We can offer max to Kawhi and there is a chance the spurs wont match. On the other end, getting a top pick is very hard to do. When was the last time we had a top pick? That was in the 80s. Since then we keep on trading those picks to the likes of proven star like Marbury, young and potential like Curry, or the if he will be in a good situation like Bargani. Come on. By this time we should have learned our lessons.

    62. The problem i see about trading our pick for any player (Cousins), is that it eats into our cap space. So instead of having a draft pick and a FA signing, which could possibly be 2 good rotation players, we would have only one. And although he is a very good young player, and his salary is not too big, i don’t think Cousins is a trascendent player. If the pick drops of the top 4, i would be ok, but if not, i’d rather have the pick.

    63. What about this:

      Philly gets Knicks #1

      Knicks get Embiid, Heat’s 2015 1st rounder (currently #16) and Sixers 2nd rounder (currently #32)

      I say yes. (These Sixer scenarios are actually quite fun to consider:)

      I’d sign off on that, especially considering the Heat will almost certainly end up in the lottery, so say #12 (actually that is where they are now per DX). Right now Kaminsky is projected to go there. That would be a great haul to get Embiid and Kaminsky (as well as an early 2nd rounder) out of a #1 pick. Obviously that’s all contingent on Embiid checking out medically.

    64. Would you trade our projected top pick Patrick Ewing to proven NBA stars like Charles Barkley? Moses Malone? Kevin Mchale?
      My ans is NO.

      Two things-
      #1 – no one in this draft is close to the prospect that Ewing was.
      #2 – yes i would trade the chance at Ewing for a “for-sure” young Barkley and DEFINITELY for Moses Malone, who’s only one of the best players in NBA history.

    65. I endorse every word of this from THCJ (@27)

      Anthony Davis is what you want every draft pick to become. Seriously, if I drafted a #1 and he gave me half of what David produces, I’d be satisfied. Paying him on a 25% max contract is no problem at all. He is the kind of player you WANT to pay a max contract to.

      Yes, bargains on rookie contracts are great; I am maybe the most vocal proponent of 2nd round picks on this board. But the #1 pick could be a bust. Anthony Davis is not a bust, and barring injury, will have a Garnett-like reputation for the next ten years.

      In response to this:

      Also, I do not believe you can sign and trade RFAs anyway. I do wonder if teams can renounce their rights to a RFA then S&T them?

      The rule is that a RFA can be part of a sign-and-trade so long as he has not already accepted an offer sheet. Once that happens (unless the offer is rescinded), the only choice is that (1) the original team matches (and keeps the player for at least one full season) or (2) the player goes to the new team.

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