Knicks Morning News (2015.08.28)

  • [New York Times] Lou Tsioropoulos, Basketball Champion, Dies at 84 (Fri, 28 Aug 2015 00:43:39 GMT)

    Tsioropoulos won an N.C.A.A. title with Kentucky in 1951 before serving in the Air Force and playing for the Boston Celtics during the rest of the ’50s.

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    Mike Kurylo

    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    20 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2015.08.28)”

    1. Man, this is the black hole of the NBA cycle. Not even a tidbit of noteworthy news or analysis in the last few days. It’s like when the tide goes way out before the tsunami barrels in.

      At least I have the Mets!

    2. ESPN did a top 100.

      Instead, rankings were assigned based on a fluid combination of subjective assessment and objective data, including per-game statistics and advanced measures like Player Efficiency Rating, Win Shares, Real Plus-Minus, WARP, Net Rating and Synergy Sports data

      #54 Kobe Bryant

      You’re doing it wrong, SI

    3. Marcelinho Huertas signed with Lakers. I hoped that we would’ve grabbed him if he decided to go to the NBA.

    4. Non hoops info:
      September is here and I am HAPPY! LOL…kids are in school…soon I can wear warmer clothes..footbal season is nigh..and hoop season is almost here…oh and my anniversary is this month. I was born in February, along with my son and my daughter, but dammit man September is my favorite month. Anyways…

      I thought about not renewing my league pass this season because I hardly watched any games because of the increasing amount of TV shows that interested me. But I think imma keep it because I am seriously intrigued with how this team is gonna look with all these high IQ role players around Melo, and seeing how much improvement Fish has made. Oh, and some Porzingis kid. Maybe Fish can pull off a “Doc Rivers in Orlando” effort, and Melo can stay healthy and carry this team into the postseason. Unlikely though, as I think the ECis much improved. I also wanna se, as a pure basketball fan, Miami (ugh!), Washington, Toronto, Houston, Phoenix (I think Hornacek is an excellent coach), and Sacramento play. Overall, I think this will be a fun season to follow.

    5. I think that until the league expands again, NBA basketball will be incredibly competitive. Thanks to recent drafts, increasing player longevity, the influx of foreign players, and the success of the D-League in developing and showcasing young players, the talent pool is very well matched to the size of the league. IMO, every team (except maybe Philly?) goes at least 8 legit NBA rotation players deep for the first time in many years.

    6. I’m not sure I would watch their games, but I am really curious to see how Milwaukee and Minnesota do this year. They both have improved rosters and are probably very optimistic roofing into the season. But Minnesota is very green, and this is Kidd’s second year at Milwaukee and who knows if he will wear out his welcome with the players or not.

    7. I think Milwaukee is gonna be a scary team once they get their chemistry down. I forgot about them. Can u imagine if Larry Sanders hadn’t lost his marbles and was still there with the roster they have now? Whoa..

    8. I think that until the league expands again, NBA basketball will be incredibly competitive. Thanks to recent drafts, increasing player longevity, the influx of foreign players, and the success of the D-League in developing and showcasing young players, the talent pool is very well matched to the size of the league. IMO, every team (except maybe Philly?) goes at least 8 legit NBA rotation players deep for the first time in many years.

      Which is why I think the league should expand again. There is enough talent out there to support two more teams. The league is more talented now than it was in its last season before Charlotte came into the league. And it is arguably more talented now than it was in 1994-95, before the Grizzlies and Raptors entered the league.

    9. The league is more talented, but at the same time, it seems that the top players are getting injured at a disproportionate rate. Durant, Love, Irving, Westbrook, George, Anthony, Wall, Bosh, Aldridge, Matthews, Parsons, Rose, etc… These are all stars in their primes that are missing a lot of time, and it only seems to be getting worse each year. Expansion proponents should probably take a hard look at this trend before deciding that the league won’t be “diluted”.

    10. “The league is more talented, but at the same time, it seems that the top players are getting injured at a disproportionate rate. Durant, Love, Irving, Westbrook, George, Anthony, Wall, Bosh, Aldridge, Matthews, Parsons, Rose, etc… These are all stars in their primes that are missing a lot of time, and it only seems to be getting worse each year. Expansion proponents should probably take a hard look at this trend before deciding that the league won’t be “diluted”.”

      Durant, Love, Westbrook, George, Anthony, Wall, Bosh, and Aldridge are all expected to be near ot at 100% next year. Irving, Matthews, and Parsons are less certain but should be back. Rose may never be what he was, but is not currently injured. He’s an effective player as is and might improve as he continues to recover. Or not. The point is, last year seemed like a bit of an outlier for injuries. Love, George and Bosh had downright freaky injuries, and Melo was playing through his. 100%. So this year has some incredible promise, between the return of these players, the continued development of younger players, and the influx of good rookies.

      That said, I’m not for expansion. I don’t think you expand solely to spread the talent out. I think the ideal situation is when every team has 5 bonafide starting-caliber players and at least 3 solid reserves. –It makes every game potentially worth watching
      –It makes every team a break or two away from making the playoffs
      –It makes the battle for playoff seeding last well into the season
      –it builds compelling rivalries

      The WC was instructive in this regard. The difference between the #1 seed and #9 seed boiled down to an injury to a star player. If Curry had gotten hurt instead of Durant, maybe the Thunder would have hoisted the trophy. Last year, SA essentially blew it’s title chances by losing the last game of the season. Next year, any team currently in the WC playoff picture who loses a key player could be on the outside looking in.

    11. Don’t get me wrong, Brian, I’m not saying that the league couldn’t easily absorb two more teams at this point, it definitely could. Personally, I wouldn’t do it until every team has 2 players at the tail end of the rotation that are capable of playing starter’s minutes without being woefully overmatched, and that the draft would not overly disrupt the chemistry of the existing teams. I don’t think we’re quite at that point yet; i.e. right now, parity should trump expansion. But there are good arguments for expansion as well, I’ll concede that.

    12. Yeah, I’m just not sure what to make of the rash of injuries to star players over the past few years. Is it an official trend yet? It has diluted the competitive balance of the league. This season the regular season saw great parity, but by the time the playoffs rolled around, there weren’t any highly competitive serieses besides the Clippers, due to all the injuries. I agree with Z-Man that the reason GS won was likely because they survived the battle of attrition between the league and the injury gods. (And they had Bogut on their team!).

      Take the ’95 playoffs (the expansion year Brian alluded to)– the league may have been less talented as a whole, but that year there were four series that went to a decisive final game. This year only the Clips series’ were hotly contested, or, frankly, even that suspenseful at all, due to injuries and more injuries.

    13. Yeah, I’m just not sure what to make of the rash of injuries to star players over the past few years. Is it an official trend yet? It has diluted the competitive balance of the league. This season the regular season saw great parity, but by the time the playoffs rolled around, there weren’t any highly competitive serieses besides the Clippers, due to all the injuries.

      Shouldn’t the absence of rare, highly-productive players make the game more competitive, as there are fewer great players to dominate?

      The issue is that players like Derrick Rose (and Brandon Jennings, Kyrie Irving, et al.) are not and have never been in the realm of “superstar” in anything but scoring volume and highlight-reel athleticism. The league suffers without them, but their absence is nothing like it would be if a player like LeBron or Chris Paul got injured. Those are the highlight-reel players who make the extra 5% of shots needed to be a true superstar.

    14. Last year did seem a bit flukey for injuries by the eye test, I wonder if it actually was or not.

      There’s lots of theories why players seem to suffer more serious injuries, especially young players like Embiid, Shump, Rose, etc. I recall reading somewhere that it’s due to a combination of overuse from a young age via year-around AAU play and building muscle strength that overtaxes ligaments and tendons. I have wondered whether the advent of the radar gun is partially responsible for the spike in elbow injuries, as kid pitchers know their velocity from elementary school onwards and try to compete with the gun.

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