Knicks Morning News (2016.06.14)

  • [New York Times] Cavaliers 112, Warriors 97 | Golden State leads series, 3-2: Cavaliers Stave Off Elimination in N.B.A. Finals (Tue, 14 Jun 2016 04:28:29 GMT)

    Big performances from LeBron James and Kyrie Irving helped the Cavaliers send the series back to Cleveland for Game 6.

  • [New York Times] Green-Less Warriors Outhustled by Resurgent Cavaliers (Tue, 14 Jun 2016 08:00:27 GMT)

    Deprived of fiery power forward Draymond Green, the Golden State Warriors were flat and unfocused on Monday as they fell to the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game Five of the NBA Finals with a chance to secure a second consecutive title.

  • [New York Times] James Refuses to Lose and Cavs’ Title Hopes Get Boost (Tue, 14 Jun 2016 06:09:27 GMT)

    LeBron James said this week that his return to the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2014 held meaning beyond a single-minded quest for an NBA championship.

  • [New York Times] James, Irving Explode to Keep Cavs Alive in NBA Finals (Tue, 14 Jun 2016 04:51:31 GMT)

    LeBron James powered the sharpshooting Cleveland Cavaliers to a season-saving 112-97 win over the defending champion Golden State Warriors on Monday to climb within 3-2 in the best-of-seven NBA Finals.

  • [New York Times] Cavaliers Dump Warriors to Stave of NBA Finals Elimination (Tue, 14 Jun 2016 03:57:31 GMT)

    LeBron James powered the sharpshooting Cleveland Cavaliers to a season-saving 112-97 win over the defending champion Golden State Warriors on Monday to climb within 3-2 in the best-of-seven NBA Finals.

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    Mike Kurylo

    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    67 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2016.06.14)”

    1. From the last thread:

      I dunno, in the OKC case, they called the same type of thing a flagrant, as well. They just didn’t outright suspend him. I don’t see how you could give a flagrant for the OKC one and not one for the Lebron one.

      That said, sure, I agree with you, the League is far, far from beyond reproach on stuff like this.

      Agree – IMHO the league HAD to suspend Draymond. As a parent of young children, I can tell you with great certainty that you can’t keep letting people get away with stuff that might but probably isn’t completely by accident or unintended. How many times does Draymond have to nutshot someone before we believe that that’s just what he does?

      That it happened before a closeout game is unfortunate in terms of perception, but it was the right thing to do.

      Unreal games by Lebron and Kyrie last night. LBJ scored 41, but his defense was just as good if not better than his offense. When he’s dialed in like that, wow. He’s still only 80% of peak Lebron from 3-4 years ago, but 80% of peak Lebron is still better than anyone else on the planet.

      His jumpshooting is such a weird thing. Who actually gets worse at shooting as they age? Even I can tell his mechanics are terrible. Doesn’t jump straight up and down. Generally fades away and kicks his legs out even on what should be on balance catch/shoot shots.

    2. That was a crazy performance from Lebron and Kyrie and I think it will genuinely take at least 2 more performances of that ilk for them to win this series.

      Curry took 21 shots last night and had 13 entering the 4th with only 3 assists at the time. You need more from the league MVP in a close out game at home without your 2nd best player than that. One could argue that Kyrie has outplayed him for most of this series.

    3. Curry took 21 shots last night and had 13 entering the 4th with only 3 assists at the time. You need more from the league MVP in a close out game at home without your 2nd best player than that. One could argue that Kyrie has outplayed him for most of this series.

      But I’m sure Curry’s injured, because if he doesn’t play well, he’s injured.

      Funny how Kevin Love plays awfully and he’s a loser, and not still suffering from a head injury.

    4. But I’m sure Curry’s injured, because if he doesn’t play well, he’s injured.

      Funny how Kevin Love plays awfully and he’s a loser, and not still suffering from a head injury.

      Hahaha, yeah.

      Curry was hurt for game 1 of the OKC series, then he was fine in game 2 when he went off after which he was hurt again for games 3 and 4, but then was okay again for games 5, 6 and 7. He was also hurt for games 1, 2 and 3 in the Finals, but recovered in time for game 4, but re-injured himself and struggled with being hurt in game 5.

      Also find it interesting that Frye didn’t even get up off the bench last night. Lue is really shortening his rotation now.

    5. I saw Golden State in six or seven and thought six was more likely, but it was close enough to a coin flip that I went with what I wanted to see: a seven game series with the last two games being all timers. Let’s hope.

    6. We tend to take Draymond Green for granted, but he’s the most important player on the Warriors and the guy they can least afford to play without. He’s their glue on defense (and offense for that matter), guards multiple positions and can hit the occasional open 3 pointer (unlike Barnes who was hideous last night, anyone who overpays that guys is nuts)

      I think Golden State takes care of business in game 6 when Draymond comes back.

    7. We tend to take Draymond Green for granted, but he’s the most important player on the Warriors and the guy they can least afford to play without.

      Nope. He’s a terrific player, but he’s not Steph.

    8. Curry was hurt for game 1 of the OKC series, then he was fine in game 2 when he went off after which he was hurt again for games 3 and 4, but then was okay again for games 5, 6 and 7. He was also hurt for games 1, 2 and 3 in the Finals, but recovered in time for game 4, but re-injured himself and struggled with being hurt in game 5.

      I know you’re mocking here, but in my experience that’s pretty standard injury recovery stuff. Injury isn’t an on-off check box where you’re injured until one day you flip the switch back to healthy. It’s a spectrum, and recovery, particularly when your hurry back, has a lot of ups and downs. One day you might feel really good but then have a lot harder time bouncing back than normal, another day you might be feeling it a ton all the sudden for reasons that aren’t really clear. Combine that with the fact that there’s already a good amount of variation in performance in a sport like basketball, and it’s not strange at all to see him flash a really good game even if the injury is still affecting him significantly.

      I do think that there’s a little bit of an inclination in the media and by fans to take things easy on Steph (certainly compared to Lebron) but I really don’t think the injury thing is that. Overall on balance he has not been the same guy since coming back from the knee injury. Even in the games he has played really well I haven’t seen the same explosion from the regular season. He’s not shaking lose from bigs as readily when they switch onto him, and he’s not getting into the lane and finishing.

    9. I wish that this series would be over already so we can concentrate on making the Knicks great again.

    10. @10

      They’ve had 3 days off between virtually every game in the Finals. His recovery between games should be fine.

    11. I dunno, in the OKC case, they called the same type of thing a flagrant, as well.

      In OKC the refs called it a flagrant on the court at the time of the incident. The league reviewed it and didn’t rescind it, or add further punishment to it.

      In this case the refs didn’t call a flagrant, or even a technical. The league reviewed it and decided the refs were wrong.

      And the incidents weren’t the same. The video in OKC was pretty damning. Green kicks Adams in the balls and Adams’s eyes cross and his knees buckle, like it was shot for an Adam Sandler movie.

      In CLE, Green was trying to stand up and play basketball, as the refs didn’t blow the whistle and the game was still going on, only LeBron’s balls were dangling over him, and sonhe made contact with them.

      There. That’s the difference between Adam’s balls and LeBron’s balls for anybody who was wondering. (Oh, and Adam’s balls are wayyyyy stronger, possibly made out of steel or maybe even plutonium).

      Point is: If the series was tied 2-2 going into game 5, I don’t think the league even reviews it. Play on.

    12. @10

      They’ve had 3 days off between virtually every game in the Finals. His recovery between games should be fine.

      I’m talking about the overall recovery from his injury, not his recovery between games. It’s not nearly as simple as you’re making it out to be.

    13. I’m talking about the overall recovery from his injury, not his recovery between games. It’s not nearly as simple as you’re making it out to be.

      The recovery time for a grade 1 MCL sprain is usually 2-4 weeks. His injury occurred in the last week of April and it’s now the 2nd week of June. Curry and Kerr have also gone on record multiple times saying that injury is not an issue for any of his struggles.

      It’s okay if Curry is playing below his standards because he’s struggling. It doesn’t need to be because he’s struggling to recover from an injury.

    14. His jumpshooting is such a weird thing. Who actually gets worse at shooting as they age? Even I can tell his mechanics are terrible. Doesn’t jump straight up and down. Generally fades away and kicks his legs out even on what should be on balance catch/shoot shots.

      The thing with LeBron is that he is so athletic, jumps so high, and he is such a threat driving to the basket, that he is really hard to defend and most of his jump shots are virtually uncontested. So, even if his shooting form is bad, he gets good percentages. As he gradually declines, he will face defenders closer and closer he will have to pick his spots (or his percentages will continue to suffer).

    15. The recovery time for a grade 1 MCL sprain is usually 2-4 weeks. His injury occurred in the last week of April and it’s now the 2nd week of June. Curry and Kerr have also gone on record multiple times saying that injury is not an issue for any of his struggles.

      It’s okay if Curry is playing below his standards because he’s struggling. It doesn’t need to be because he’s struggling to recover from an injury.

      That’s recovery time to being back on the court. Not to being 100%. Kerr’s quote in the OKC series when the injury talk was at its peak was this:

      When you’re an athlete playing at a high level, you compete and you don’t sit here and you say, ‘Well my toe hurts or my knee hurts or my foot hurts.’ Everybody’s got nicks and bruises and stuff this time of year. It hasn’t been the ideal postseason for Steph obviously with the injuries and the stops and starts to his playoff run, but it doesn’t matter. Everyone deals with stuff. Ask Oklahoma City and the injuries they’ve dealt with over the years in their playoff runs. It doesn’t matter. You play, you do your best, you give whatever you can and you see what happens.

      If your takeaway from quotes like that is Kerr is saying the injury is not a factor in his struggles I don’t know what to tell you. Does Curry’s movement and explosion actually look the same as it did in the regular season to you?

    16. It’s okay if Curry is playing below his standards because he’s struggling. It doesn’t need to be because he’s struggling to recover from an injury.

      Yes, but he could also have some other nagging injuries. He’s been rumored to have shoulder and/or elbow injuries as well. We won’t know until after the playoffs (if ever). I’m sure some other dudes in the series are also banged up. It’s just interesting to watch the media narratives shift wildly after every game.

    17. Does Curry’s movement and explosion actually look the same as it did in the regular season to you?

      It looks fine in the games where he plays well. It doesn’t in the games he struggles. Is that because he’s injured or because he’s struggling relative to his standards? I’m not sure, but I’m not going to keep blaming it on an injury when he’s put up big numbers in multiple games after coming back including big performances in games 5, 6 and 7 to close out the WCF against a much better defensive team in OKC.

    18. It’s just interesting to watch the media narratives shift wildly after every game.

      That’s my point and I think it sucks. Apparently Curry can’t ever struggle because the other team is playing good defense on him or because he’s just in a slump, relatively speaking. It has to be because he’s injured or what not.

      Like you said, at this time of year everybody is dealing with injuries of some sort. It’s okay to criticize him for playing below par instead of finding something to explain it away.

    19. It looks fine in the games where he plays well.

      Okay, we’ll just have to agree to disagree then I think. Even in the games where he has played well he has largely struggled to create space to my eyes because he just doesn’t seem to have the same laterla explosion as in the regular season. 80% of Steph Curry is still capable of going off at times, but I haven’t seen a single game that looks like 100% of Steph Curry to me.

      Like I said I generally agree with you that Steph gets a great rub from the media, and I’m rooting heavily against GS in this series if that makes any difference. I just can’t agree that the injury angle is purely a media narrative in this case.

    20. All this criticism of the “media narrative” seems ironic. I’ve read stories hypothesizing curry injuries and I’ve read stories making fun of the curry excuse industry. Summarizing that panoply into a predominant media narrative is itself a narrative.

      Curry has had two of the best offensive years in NBA history, not just great years or Kevin love years but historic years, and has missed games this post season because of injury; so when his performance shows more downside volatility than usual it’s reasonable to look for tertiary causes as possible factors. It’s also reasonable to doubt that injuries have been an important factor. I’ve seen a lot of both. Everyone is always looking for underlying bias of some kind, because underlying bias is always and everywhere, but this is such a nothing example of it.

    21. it might seem like curry is struggling but all his rate stats are in-line with his finals performance last year.. he’s been good but just not other worldly.. esp when compared to his bonkers regular season… in fact he’s actually underperformed his regular season in the playoffs the last 3 years….

    22. in fact he’s actually underperformed his regular season in the playoffs the last 3 years

      Well, that’s what you’d expect.

    23. well yes it’s pretty hard to top what curry has done in the reg season against playoff teams no less but someone like lebron usually doesn’t lose much… he is usually as good as reg season lebron…

      reg season and playoff curry the last 3 years it’s been a fairly wide gap… he goes from being jordan level good to about harden level good…. and when there’s such a wide gap like that you’re going to think something’s wrong with him… when in actuality tougher defenses probably impact a guy like curry more…

    24. OK. I’ve decided. Let’s just add a terrific point guard like Conley and we’ll have at least 4/5ths of a great team. Then we can use Grant/Wroten/Gallo/Jose at the other guard position while at the same time looking for an upgrade (E’Twaun Moore, Turner, Lee, Gordon, Crawford, Gerald Green, draft pick). This would get us very close to competing for a championship so Conley would be worth the money.

    25. @24 Solid all-around player, but the Knicks really need (and, probably, Hornacek covets) better shooting and maybe speed/athleticism.

      Turner will likely be too expensive for his value to the Knicks. The Celtics will probably offer him a nice amount to stay, so teams will have to overpay him, even relative to the cap increase, to get him. He fits well with the Celtics.

      I’d rather offer more for Batum. Now, if Turner waits out the market, and the Knicks cannot land any of the top couple of tiers of 3 and D type guys…

    26. @27 Conley is a very good player, but his Achilles concerns me. Plus, the Knicks have 3 young PG types (though Galloway is really more of a two) to look at this season. The Knicks desperately need someone who can both shoot and defend at the 2. And finally, there is likely to be a bounty of PG on the market next year…

      Maybe the Knicks will go for Conley and try to get a bargain to try out at the 2, but I hope they go the other direction…

    27. I think that either way would be a major upgrade. It’s just that Conley would make us so much better immediately. Of the likely SGs, possibly only Batum would do that for us and he seems more likely to stay with his team.

      Adding either of these guys makes us contenders for an ECF.

    28. Curry and Thompson have had defenders glued to them, played physically, and had schemes drawn up to keep them from getting their shots off. Despite this, both players have .60% TS for the series. The narrative should be that they are shooting well despite the added pressure.

      And Livingston, Barbosa, Iguodala, Green, etc, have benefitted from the added attention to Curry and Thompson. So when “MVP” is deliberated upon, more than just rate stats should be considered.

      Curry has shown he’s willing to accept a defensive scheme hell bent on stopping him. He played in this game, after all:

      http://espn.go.com/mens-college-basketball/recap?gameId=283302166

    29. Maybe the Knicks will go for Conley and try to get a bargain to try out at the 2, but I hope they go the other direction…

      try to get a bargain

      bargain

      bargaini

      bargani

      bargnani

      yes

    30. @reub

      you realize that you’re suggesting Mike Conley adds 30 wins + makes up for the loss of Afflalo and probably Williams, right? The greatest season in terms of win shares was Kareem in 71/72 when he added 25.4 wins.

    31. @max

      You realize what synergy and floor-spacing are, right? The greatest season in terms of Kobe Assist Attempts was 2013-14, when Carmelo took 1643 FGA and registered an even 900 Kobe Assist Attempts. Imagine Conley’s contribution to that prowess after an Achilles injury.

      Also, reub is a borderline troll only with a fraction of THCJ’s charm, so reader beware.

    32. @31 agreed, great points. Also relating to regular season performance vs. playoff performance, it is harder to scheme against a player/system on some random game in January. During the playoffs the opposing coaches and players have time to prepare and concentrate on particular game plans night after night. I think that would help explain some decrease in performance in the playoffs vs. the regular season. It is true, the superstar should be able to overcome that, we’ll see. If GSW wins the series as expected, no one will remember all the blowouts and “subpar” games by Curry & Thompson. Meanwhile LBJ and Kyrie went off last night. Cavs will need those types of games from both to win as the rest of Cleveland’s supporting cast is meh.

    33. I’d say also that basketball defense is inherently reactive and relies more on individual principles than a specialized scheme. (Offense too, probably.) Coaches can prepare players for plays that a team routinely uses but if a player is thinking about defensive scheme while Curry is making a split-second decision to shoot, penetrate or pass, the player has already lost the possession. So while it’s reasonable to assume that a player is “better prepared” for a commonly-used function of an opposing team’s offense, it’s not going to instantly turn Mo Speights into a defender who won’t get burned on a LeBron James dribble-drive because he’s thinking, “Coach told me that LeBron penetrates on 65% of his possessions when the ball starts behind the arc, so I should play off him a little more.”

      If there are truly awful jump shooters, like Tyson Chandler for instance, maybe a defender recognizes that and plays off the ball more. But these things are likely instantaneous, intuitive decisions, not reasoned ones.

    34. Yeah, that was not Jowles’ best effort. reub must be getting to him.

      If your point is that shitty defensive players will play shitty defense no matter what the scheme, duh.

      I mean, do you really think that Curry’s split-second decision making does not consider the opposing team’s overall defensive scheme?

    35. it’s sooooo outlandish that basketball might be more habitual than cerebral, ok haha ok

      “scheme?” no

      immediate position of bodies relative to his goal (shoot the round ball)? yes

      no good basketball player goes, OH IT’S A 1-2-2 ZONE I MUST PRESSURE THE CORNERS AND HIGH POST BECAUSE OF THE INHERENT WEAKNESSES THEREIN

      it’s intuition and habit

    36. If there are truly awful jump shooters, like Tyson Chandler for instance, maybe a defender recognizes that and plays off the ball more. But these things are likely instantaneous, intuitive decisions, not reasoned ones.

      “Maybe” teams defend Tyson Chandler differently than Steph Curry, but it’s just an instantaneous intuitive decision, not a reasoned one, or part of like a game plan or something. Holy shit. This is an impressively bad take, even for you.

    37. Jowles what is the purpose of these statements you’re making?

      Btw should I go back and find every comment you made about how GSW was stupid as hell for not trading shitty Klay Thompson for once in a generation player Kevin Love?

    38. Also relating to regular season performance vs. playoff performance, it is harder to scheme against a player/system on some random game in January. During the playoffs the opposing coaches and players have time to prepare and concentrate on particular game plans night after night. I think that would help explain some decrease in performance in the playoffs vs. the regular season.

      This is what I was responding to because it rings as an ex post facto explanation for “decrease in performance.” It seems much more likely that it’s because teams are playing their best players longer (which is objectively true) and that players are playing hard for 48 minutes (reasonable assertion), which is not necessarily the case in the regular season in December.

      Coaches can draw up all the schemes they want. The understanding of an opponent’s offense is much easier than the execution of a new defensive scheme to stop that specific offense. Because basketball strategy tends toward the intuitive and habitual, not calculated and precise.

    39. That’s fair but I think to a certain degree teams can shift game plans to specific players. Youll always be able to find singular instances where intuition overrides the game plan, but I think especially later in the playoffs you can see teams executing opponent specific game plans with much better consistency than normal.

    40. Sure, and it’s not like this is the first time that Andrew Bogut has played LeBron James, etc. I’ve never played Kyrie Irving or even studied his tape but I sure know that he’s probably going to try to beat me on the dribble and make me pay on corner threes.

      If there’s some kind of cheat code that coaches can push against a specific offense type, then sure, coaching really matters. But this stuff needs to be drilled into players long before a specific matchup.

    41. If there are truly awful jump shooters, like Tyson Chandler for instance, maybe a defender recognizes that and plays off the ball more. But these things are likely instantaneous, intuitive decisions, not reasoned ones.

      You can’t be serious. This stuff is all coached intensely, even in the levels I played, which were not professional. We can all deride Mike Woodson for over-switching on D, but it was in fact a reasoned plan. Badly reasoned, but still reasoned. I mean, “get up on him” is a very typical thing to coach a defensive player on when guarding someone like Klay Thompson. “Deny him the baseline” is a typically coached part of defense. “Force him to his left” is frequently heard. “Funnel him to Tyson” is a coached, reasoned defense. There are dozens of examples, specific and general, of reasoned approaches to defenses that are ENTIRELY COACHED AND NOT IN ANY WAY SPONTANEOUS.

      The best example?

      Obviously, Battier is atypical, as Lewis writes (what a good writer!), but it still points to the fact you are, Mr. J, spouting nonsense.

    42. rama,

      Normally we’re in agreement, but did you even read the article?

      People often say that Kobe Bryant has no weaknesses to his game, but that’s not really true. Before the game, Battier was given his special package of information. “He’s the only player we give it to,” Morey says. “We can give him this fire hose of data and let him sift. Most players are like golfers. You don’t want them swinging while they’re thinking.”

      I mean– holy shit, do you realize you just gave strong evidence that I’m fucking right? C’mon.

    43. It may be that some players can’t adjust effectively to their opponent, but some players clearly can. Just remember all the comments Frazier makes about defense when calling the game. He clearly could adjust to different player’s tendencies. This may be a big part of being a good defender rather than a bad defender.

    44. Conley is a good player, but adding him is not going to add that many wins to our total of 32. I’d be willing to guess (or hope) that better efficiency scoring from KP will add more wins than Conley. The combination might get us to .500 unless KP really breaks out and gets his efficiency to a high level.

    45. Conley is a very good player and if healthy he definitely adds wins, maybe even enough to get us to an 8th seed. I just don’t think he’s a max player by any stretch. Maxing him out is a “win now” move and we’re simply not a “win now” team. Let’s not forget that Detroit, Orlando, Washington, Chicago and Milwaukee are all as likely to improve next year as us. Some WC teams will be harder to beat as well. There are a ton of promising sophomores out there…Porzingis isn’t the only one!

      I would truly like to see us give either Grant, Lin or some D-Leaguer or draft pick (Felder!) a shot at giving us league-average play at PG. There definitely will be someone available to us, either now or at the trade deadline/waiver wire. Patience, Phil!

    46. Z-man, We agree on Conley’s value as a player but we learned, last off-season, that value and cost are not the same. There’s an extreme premium on players of his caliber and he’s going to get a max deal. And with the dearth of point guards out there, he’s the best and you win with the best. Sometimes you need to overspend.

    47. I’m not seeing the same value in a Conley pickup as you guys. He’s an above average PG, but not anything special. For all his short comings defensively, Calderon actually does a couple of things better on offense than Conley. So I don’t see any huge number of wins increase. It will be a handful of wins.

    48. Calderon actually does a couple of things better on offense than Conley

      What exactly are these things? The only thing he does better than Conley is spot up 3 point shooting, which he doesn’t even get enough volume from because of his hesitance and slow release. I don’t want to sign Conley and feel it’s an overpay, but going from bottom-3 PG rotation to above average starter is a much bigger leap than people are giving it credit for.

      Is that leap worth the price of what it would take to get Conley and would it help our long-term trajectory enough to be really competitive? I don’t think so, but Conley is significantly better than anybody we had running point last year and really since the 2 weeks of Linsanity.

    49. Yeah, Conley would be such a massive step up from Calderon it’s not even funny. Even comparing their individual numbers really doesn’t do the comparison justice.

      How much better do you think KP would play with a PG who could both penetrate (unlike Jose) and shoot (unlike Grant)?

      How much more efficient would Melo be with a smart, veteran PG (consider his best seasons came when he played with Billups and Kidd)?

      How much more intimidating would the KP/Rolo tandem be as defenders of the paint if every opposing guard wasn’t given a running start at to get to the rim?

      Conley is not the best PG in the NBA and in a perfect world wouldn’t cost the max, but he is both tangibly and intangibly MUCH better than Calderon. He’s the best FA guard on the market so yeah, he will get the max.

    50. Conley would be a terrific acquisition for a team that needs an upgrade at PG and plans to contend in the next 2 years (like the Spurs, for example). That’s not the Knicks.

    51. Conley would be a terrific acquisition for a team that needs an upgrade at PG and plans to contend in the next 2 years (like the Spurs, for example). That’s not the Knicks.

      But it would be so nice to have a balanced team for once…

    52. @iserp

      If by balanced you mean true starter talent at every position, then all Conley would do is further remove us from that possibility. Increasing our talent level requires bringing in assets that won’t depreciate and that are on discounted contracts. The only way you do that is by investing in players — signing them or drafting them when their not fully developed and giving them the burn and the coaching to improve… and then hoping. Do that with enough players, and you’ll win with some, and your contracts with the others will be favorable enough that you can dump them easily.

      If by balanced you mean, “I just want to a reason to justify believing we’ll make the playoffs,” then sure, let’s get Conley. He’d probably get us up to around 42 wins, which wasn’t enough to make the playoffs last year, but maybe this time!

      Every time you reach to improve short term, you are settling for less overall productivity than if you make a long term investment. You want a better team, forget about all the guys who are known quantities.

      By the way, Conley is 28 now but will be 29 by the time the season starts, so you’re signing a 29 year old. Let’s say we’re optimistically hoping to compete in two years, when MC is 31. Name a top 40 player who is a guard and is 31 or older. The closest you’ll get is JJ Redick.

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