NY Post: Scott Perry safe as Knicks GM after newest front-office hire

Berman with some “sort of kind of news”:

With Brock Aller soon to jump from the Cavaliers to become the Knicks’ vice president of strategy, general manager Scott Perry still will plow on in preparing for the NBA draft and is expected to run it — whenever the event takes place.

However, Perry’s long-term future as GM still is not guaranteed with his contract up June 30. The draft is scheduled for June 25 and could remain there if the NBA cancels its season in May.

Though Rose is considering keeping Perry, one NBA source told The Post, “The impression is Leon will do his due diligence.’’

An urgency to make a change, though, is lessened because of the new logistics amid the COVID-19 pandemic, especially with New York the nation’s epicenter.

“The shutdown may have helped everyone — at least temporarily,’’ one NBA source connected to the Knicks said.

Aller, who has been with the Cavaliers since 2014 as a capologist, will have a broader role with the Knicks. He is a financial maven coming in during a financial crisis. NBA teams face a revenue stream that has dried up completely.

NBA sources believe teams will tighten their belts on the size of front-office staffs. Sources have indicated Aller will look to reconfigure and even streamline the Knicks’ massive scouting/basketball operations department.

You simply cannot have Perry run your draft and then fire him. That’s just incompetent. And, of course, it’s what the Knicks already did a few years ago by letting Phil draft Ntilikina and then fire Phil right afterwards.

Based on the guys Rose was talking about hiring, Perry is as mediocre as any of them, so whatever, better Perry than Allan fuckin’ Houston, ya know? But it’d be nice if they could hire someone good, like the Bulls did. But in the absence of someone good, Perry would be fine.

And who knows who might become available in a year? There’s a certain Canadian GM whose contract is up at the end of next season, after all. Dare to dream, people! Dare to dream!

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268 thoughts to “NY Post: Scott Perry safe as Knicks GM after newest front-office hire”

  1. You simply cannot have Perry run your draft and then fire him. That’s just incompetent.

    It’s becoming a NY tradition, though. You mentioned Phil but we let Ed Tapscott draft Frederic Weis, too, before firing him. And if I’m not mistaken, the Jets did this recently, as well.

  2. “I see the disinfectant where it knocks it out in a minute. One minute. And is there a way we can do something like that, by injection inside or almost a cleaning? So it’d be interesting to check that. [Points to his head] I’m not a doctor.”

    I think it’s so beyond idiotic to think he was suggesting injecting Clorox or Lysol you pretty much lose credibility on every subject on the planet for the rest of your life if that’s what you think.

    He was suggesting there are things that kill the virus quickly (like disinfectants and UVA/B, humidity etc..) and perhaps there is a way to inject SOMETHING into the lungs that would work in the same way, but not specifically Lyson or Clorox. This story is hilarious.

    How bad does your case of Trump Derangement Syndrome have to be to think he meant injecting Lysol or Clorox?

    I could make a list of 20 things wrong with Trump. It would contain a significant subset of personality disorders. But he’s not a complete fucking idiot. What he did was segue from talking about household disinfectants to possible treatments that could “disinfect” lungs in the same way (using some medicine) in a bad way. It may also be a bad medical idea, but that’s a different issue. Of course it allowed the scumbags in the media to attack him and dumb people in the public to believe it.

    I can’t stand Trump, but at least i’m not suffering from some sort of mental illness over it.

  3. Z-man:
    PS I don’t actually think you are either a moron or an idiot. Just an abrasive, condescending, self-righteous, unapologetic, and often tedious blowhard. Not that I’m perfect in any of those regards, but man, your soapbox is fucking gold-plated.

    This is a reasonable critique. I’m not absent self awareness.

    I tend to come from such a different angle that I find I often have to explain myself in much greater detail than most here. Many of you are beginning from a commonality, so you can get your point across with less words bc you already agree on 60% of the argument.

    I appreciate the guys like Jowles, JK47, TNFH, and even you sometimes who disagree with nearly everything I say but at least recognize that it’s still an honest viewpoint.

  4. Bob I get everything you’re saying.

    To me, it’s the Saquon argument all over again.

    I loved Gettelman’s decision to draft him. He’s special. He needed a QB, but the QB’s weren’t special. He took the special player despite the fact that the position wasn’t as important.

    I think he did the opposite here. He passed on the special player for need. I know we need an OT but I’d have taken the special player and filled the position of need later or another way, like he did the QB position.

  5. It’s interesting reading about the Giants here. It seems that Gettleman is getting good players but maybe is paying too much. The Knicks, on the other hand, aren’t getting players, but generally aren’t paying too much. If Gettleman were running the Knicks maybe he would have just paid KP and kept him. That might have been better than where we are now.

    The Jets seem to be actually doing a normal rebuild. Wouldn’t that be nice for the Knicks.

  6. Actually, strat, you’re the one who is being willfully ignorant due to an overdose of motivated reasoning. There is lots of evidence that, yes, he really did mean using disinfectant.

    This has been peddled for years as a miracle cure for autism and other diseases in the same community of conspiracy theorists, anti-vaxxers, and fraudsters where Trump makes his home: https://www.foxnews.com/health/bleach-products-not-cure-autism-fda-warns

    And guess what – someone was peddling it to Trump just last week! https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/24/revealed-leader-group-peddling-bleach-cure-lobbied-trump-coronavirus

    Note, in that article, that this cure has been peddled by right-wing nutjob Alan Keyes, who was one of a number of Presidential candidates who presaged Trump within the GOP. (Along with Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich, Sarah Palin, etc.)

    And Trump’s own defense of his remarks was that he was being sarcastic: https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/04/24/disinfectant-injection-coronavirus-trump/. Not that he was talking about something other than disinfectant – he admits that he was talking about disinfectant but now claims it was just a joke.

    Your defense of Trump is that “he’s not a complete fucking idiot.” But all evidence is that Trump actually is a massive idiot. He just happened to be a great conman at a time when our white collar laws weren’t being enforced against the rich (so he dodged jail) and there were a massive number of voters primed for his BS by right-wing media. But he is, most certainly, a massive idiot. There is loads and loads and loads of evidence for that. If you can’t see it, then it is you who have TDS, not the rest of us.

  7. One more thing: your entire argument that Trump isn’t “a complete fucking idiot” rests on the idea that he was just inventing imaginary medical treatments out of thin air. But that’s an insanely idiotic thing to do!

    Hey, I have ideas, too! Why don’t we cure cancer by spraying mineral oils over the patient? Has anyone looked into that? Can someone check to see if eating grass cures dementia? And here’s a good one: what if the Knicks win more games by punching other players in the nads, but in a way that isn’t a flagrant foul? I’m not exactly sure how that would work but I think it’s something our experts should look into.

  8. I was laughing yesterday about how Trump had people defending him by trying to parse his language to come up with a way where he wasn’t dumb and then he cut the legs off from under them the next day by saying, “No, it was dumb, but intentionally so.” But I didn’t expect defenses of his language after he outright conceded that it was as dumb as everyone said (just “purposefully” so).

  9. The “we’re pivoting to this was all one big joke” telegram didn’t reach Strat in time :(

  10. I await the vigorous defense of Joe Biden when he inevitably makes a gaffe and gets some fact wrong and the whole right wing noise machine descends on him as being basically a senile vegetable. I’m sure Strat will be right here telling us how unfayeer it all is.

  11. I think it’s so beyond idiotic to think he was suggesting injecting Clorox or Lysol you pretty much lose credibility on every subject on the planet for the rest of your life if that’s what you think.

    oh hi knickerblogger still totally sucks? see you at the draft. be the truth you want to tell to the world. many people are saying it.

  12. Hubert: This is a reasonable critique. I’m not absent self awareness.

    I tend to come from such a different angle that I find I often have to explain myself in much greater detail than most here. Many of you are beginning from a commonality, so you can get your point across with less words bc you already agree on 60% of the argument.

    I appreciate the guys like Jowles, JK47, TNFH, and even you sometimes who disagree with nearly everything I say but at least recognize that it’s still an honest viewpoint.

    Fair enough, though it seems that your viewpoints are often selected out of a desire to appear uniquely clever, when the nuance you hammer away at is not really worth a billion posts and counterposts. As much as I can surmise (and I only half paid attention), you seem to be saying that there is more that can be done to open up the economy relatively safely, and that being overly rigid can have consequences such as long-term or even irreparable damage to the economy, which will put lives at risk in a different way. Most of us get that, and the disagreement lies in the when and how. We get that you are not calling for radically getting rid of all forms of social distancing or that you don’t think that expanding testing is essential to safely and wisely re-opening the economy.

    I think your assessment that NahNahNah didn’t seem interested in giving you some benefit of the doubt is valid. That’s something we all could probably do better, and him especially.

  13. So are we mentally prepared for the Cole “Blood in the Ground” Anthony era of Knicks basketball? He of the blessed .380 FG% is ready to lead us to the glory of picking 8th next year.

  14. be the truth you want to tell to the world. many people are saying it.

    you’ve been gone too long…why do you deprive us so…

  15. Cole may be a super risky pick in the upper half of the lottery but my gut feeling is that he will eventually be a pretty good player.

  16. When you walk through the garden
    you gotta watch your back
    well I beg your pardon
    walk the straight and narrow track
    if you walk with Jesus
    he’s gonna save your soul
    you gotta keep the devil
    way down in the hole

    looked up the lyrics after finishing season 1…trying my best to savor the series and not gorge – cuz, after five, that’s all they wrote folks…

    still early in season 2…almost done with hard cases – been really impressed with chris baur…what a job he’s doing this season…

    so yeah, didn’t know they had different folks singing the different season’s theme…i’m having a hard time with tom waits voice – it is not pleasing to my ear…sorry tom…i’ve heard his name before, but, not familiar with his music…can’t wait to hear the neville bros sing that shit…

    my dad liked those crime procedurals like ncis and law and order a lot… i’ve seen em when i was visiting…i don’t know – how do you tell a complete story in an hour, less time than that actually…i have a bunch of grisham and turow on the shelf…not my favorite genre though anymore…

    i did like homicide: life on the streets, but, that perspective was mainly from the cop side of view…love dexter…although not all the seasons, or the books are all winners – i’ve never seen an author before wrap a story up in as few pages as jeff lindsay did…so vivid with his detail in describing the sights, sounds, smells and even the weather…280 or so pages of blissful immersion, and, then boom, wrap the whole detective stuff up in about 10 pages…a lot of his endings just felt rushed a bit…really good writing though…

    look, we’re like an old lady’s book club…just in case it happens to come up as a topic of discussion – i finished spartacus; blood and sand…again…

  17. howdy pepper…hope you and the missus are all well…you all got this thing right, up there by the bay…

    i used to live off montague, close to the 880…it’s packed with people, but, not that far from the coast…my goodness, the weather though there around san jose…no need to guess at it, chances are very good it’s 80 and beautiful…

    it’s funny, head 30 or 40 minutes south to gilroy and you’re guaranteed to bake…

    been a while since i’ve visited the boardwalk over in santa cruz…first time i went there was in the early 90’s…it was a cool place…i miss the ocean…

  18. hey geo…all good up here….we locked it down real quick…I was down in Houston the second week in March on business and they were walking around like nothing was happening…I landed back in Oakland and saw plenty of masks and then got on BART the next day and you could tell people were gearing up…by following Monday…most companies had gone to work from home and then the city and then the county…in my county of 1.1 million…I live off 80 by the race track near Albany…we have like 800 cases…..in my town of 26k…we have 9 cases…

    Weather is real nice…mid 70’s today…if I drive like 20 mintues towards Walnut Creek it is probably in the 80’s…

    I used to hit Santa Cruz to walk the pier, eat shrooms, smoke weed but the better beach is south down by Capitola…

    funny story will use another post…

  19. a couple of weeks back you mentioned trading cards…i collected thousands, hoops, hockey, baseball, football, partridge family, all kinds of stuff (70-80;s)…after I read your post I went looking for my prize collection which I have in a speacial photo album…like my top 500 which are mostly rookie cards, rarities, etc., and I couldn’t find it…i panicked and accused my son’s “vape smoking hoodlum” friends of stealing it and later that day I found the album stuffed in a box in the garage…my son looked at me like “you stoopid old ass” hold your tongue next time…anyway…I keep it next to my nightstand now…

  20. btw…what has scott perry ever done that suggests he is good at being a GM? It’s not like he left a great legacy in Sacto or Orlando…

  21. I heard Kim Jung Un injected himself with Bleach — so…. 4th-dimensional checkmate?

  22. SARCASTIC JOKE ALERT
    DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME

    Trump’s thinking ain’t bad.
    It’s just incomplete.
    Why inject or drink the bleach when you can stick it up your ass as a suppository.
    Even if it doesn’t kill the Corona your shit will smell like lavender!

  23. “He needed a QB, but the QB’s weren’t special.”

    He thought Jones was special and that is why he drafted him at 6. He didn’t think drafting the pass rusher at 6 and praying Jones was still available at 17 when Washington drafted before us and teams like Denver were sitting at 20 desperately needing a QB (they took lock in the second round) who had the draft capital to move up 4 or 5 slots.

    His calculus that Jones and someone like Dexter Lawrence was better than Josh Allen and a significant chance of no QB. Gettleman also has been not as wildly overspending as you say.

    He let overrated safety Collins walk and sign a huge contract with the Skins and watched him “anchor” a terrible defense. A safety that can’t cover in space isn’t worth large dollars.

    He signed Beckham long term as per Mara’s instructions and then neatly flipped him for Jabril Peppers, Dexter Lawrence and Oshane Ximinez. Ximinez had a terrific rookie season coming from very small college football school ODU and had 4.5 sacks in part time play getting his feet wet. He reminds me of Osi coming out of Troy State who had ONE sack as a rookie and blossomed in year 2.

    Those were 2 pretty slick cost saving moves .

  24. I hate to agree with bob, but if the Knicks had drafted Giannis at #3 would anyone have cared if we could have traded down and drafted him at #15? If the Jets had drafted Tom Brady at # 4, would it have mattered if we could have traded down and gotten him in the 5th round? At the end of the day, if you draft the right guy wherever you pick, all the maneuvering shit doesn’t matter. If Dan Jones becomes a franchise quarterback, it was a brilliant move to draft him. Case closed.

  25. i panicked and accused my son’s “vape smoking hoodlum” friends of stealing it

    oh, that had me rolling…yeah i’m pretty sure the kids will be the death of me yet :)

    oh man, you’re close by the water ain’t you, can you walk to it (3 miles or so?)

  26. the 1 is not a bad drive most days up from monterey…little bit of traffic at some points,,,other than a fruit stand every great once in awhile, never stopped much in between those two points…i’ve seen the sign, don’t think i’ve visited the town though…

    a little south of carmel is a park called point lobos…they have some of the most scenic tucked away spots along the coast line…

  27. I keep it next to my nightstand now…

    hide it under some dirty clothes or dishes in the sink – chances are the kids will never find them…

  28. btw…what has scott perry ever done that suggests he is good at being a GM? It’s not like he left a great legacy in Sacto or Orlando…

    Nuthin’. But he’s done enough that he seems like he’s at least mediocre.

  29. Agreed, and by comparison to many Knick GMs at least mediocre is much better than it could be.

  30. Yep. I’d very much prefer them to hire a good GM, but if the options are proven mediocrity Scott Perry and walking dumpster fires like Allan Houston, I’d just as soon see them stick with Perry.

    It’s kind of nuts how there was that leaked list of GMs Rose was interested in and there were legit good names on there, and then the freakin’ Bulls snared the best one on the list and the Knicks were then rumored to be into Allan fuckin’ Houston! Argh! Why are things always so shitty for the Knicks?

  31. I know that this is a board meme, but I genuinely believe DRed would make this a playoff roster within three years. I cannot say the same for any hire Dolan would actually make.

  32. Scott has been decent with trades, but his talent evaluation has been pretty bad minus Mitch. Maybe that’s more of a scouting problem? I’m not really sure.

    The Knicks would have to either get “lucky” or actively fuck things up to blow this draft. I think they’re fine if they stay in the 6-9 range. Toppin, Haliburton, Hayes, Okongwu will all be above average pros in my opinion, and they’re all slated to go in that range. Just don’t get cute.

  33. The more I think about routes to getting good, the more I think a lot of It’s about getting lucky, not great GMing. Look at Memphis or New Orleans, for example. Just having management that doesn’t sabotage is a step and enables luck to actually be helpful.

  34. Z-man: If Dan Jones becomes a franchise quarterback, it was a brilliant move to draft him. Case closed.

    I am not sure that the case is closed.

    If the argument is that you can reliably identify all-world hall-of-fame talents like Giannis or Brady, then sure, you should pick them. However, as with Dan Jones, the statistical profile of these three players before entering the draft does not suggest that they would be such talents. And if you can’t identify the statistical outlier, then the process isn’t repeatable. Now, if you are saying that Gettleman is using the “eye-test” effectively, then the conversation pretty much ends there. If you are a regular reader of this blog and believe in the effectiveness of the eye-test, I’m not about to change your mind. But let’s further assume that for many hall-of-fame talents, the pre-draft statistical profile isn’t an appropriate forward-looking metric. This still favors a strategy of asset collection (and thus not selecting D Jones in Round 1), because an inherently random draft process favors maximum darts thrown at the board.

    Let’s say you do in fact identify an all-world talent like say, Patrick Ewing, Jacob DeGrom, or Darrell Revis. These are examples that even identifying all-world talents isn’t the end of the conversation. You still need to surround them with other effective players. So if you are wasting a draft position on the Daniel Jones’s of the world, you are handicapping your ability to fill out the rest of the roster. Because hitting lightning once doesn’t equal a championship.

    Perhaps the conversation is whether it’s better to be lucky or good. If we are using the benefit of hindsight, then sure, I would always prefer to be lucky. Since any given draft only has a few hall-of-fame talents (and they are almost never are drafted 1-2-3), knowing beforehand who is of such caliber is…

  35. Well, the Jets appear to finally have a competent GM who can conduct a good draft. I’m not thrilled with all JD’s picks, but he just spent more draft capital on OL than the previous GM did in five drafts….combined. And, he understands how to trade down effectively.

    Now, as for the Knicks and Mets…

  36. NahNahNah, you think I’m a troll and I think your vapid commentary is at the very bottom of the KB posting chain, so there’s no point in seriously engaging with you. I think you’d do the board a favor if you, indeed, just went the other way.

  37. I fail to see what’s vapid about that post, Z-man. Are you sure this isn’t old beef?

  38. Perhaps the conversation is whether it’s better to be lucky or good.

    i’ll cut right to the chase – i was watching this study/social experiment some guy was doing in some small town in the UK about “luck”…

    it was on one of them pseudo science channels, like the science channel…basically at the end of the show some weird lucky lottery type shit happens – but, the interesting part is that a person’s “luck” seems to have a bunch to do with them being open and aware to opportunity…

    which is to say – it could be raining hundreds from the sky, good chance our hero dave would tighten his hat and glasses a bit, and keep right on going…

  39. ***perhaps the conversation is whether it’s better to be lucky or good***

    Machiavelli had this conversation with himself once. He wrote it down and called it The Prince.

    “It is better to be impetuous than cautious, for Fortune is a woman, and it is necessary, if you wish to keep her down, to beat her and knock her about. And one sees that she lets herself be conquered by men of this sort more than by those who proceed coldly.”

    So now you know what he thinks about luck. And about women. And about rape.

  40. “i’ll cut right to the chase – i was watching this study/social experiment some guy was doing in some small town in the UK about “luck”…”

    Fortune favors the prepared mind. Our friend Masai gets “luckier” when he has beaten the bushes more thoroughly than …. say…. Phil.

    And it also helps to have Dolan negociating across the table from you when you know he is desperate for something.

  41. The Honorable Cock Jowles:
    I fail to see what’s vapid about that post, Z-man. Are you sure this isn’t old beef?

    not that old…

    but since you brought it up, my point is that I think some get too bothered and judgmental when a GM doesn’t want to get too cute about drafting a particular prospect a few spots higher or lower….could Gettelman really be sure that Jones would be available in the 2nd round, or even 5 picks later? Even if the odds are 95%, if you think he’s your franchise QB, why take that risk? And if he turns out to be the guy, why would fans fault him for not taking the risk?

    There are lots of very good reasons for Giants fans to dislike Gettelman, but drafting Jones at #6 shouldn’t be one of them, at least not at this point. And I’m not even a Giant’s fan.

  42. Z-man: not that old…

    but since you brought it up, my point is that I think some get too bothered and judgmental when a GM doesn’t want to get too cute about drafting a particular prospect a few spots higher or lower….could Gettelman really be sure that Jones would be available in the 2nd round, or even 5 picks later?Even if the odds are 95%, if you think he’s your franchise QB, why take that risk? And if he turns out to be the guy, why would fans fault him for not taking the risk?

    There are lots of very good reasons for Giants fans to dislike Gettelman, but drafting Jones at #6 shouldn’t be one of them, at least not at this point. And I’m not even a Giant’s fan.

    Fair enough. If I follow this logic path, then would it have made sense for Gettleman to trade the farm for the #1 overall pick, and then select Jones? If you know Jones is THE MAN, then this is a sound plan. Because waiting around at #6 gives five other teams the chance to draft the next Tom Brady. This isn’t meant as a troll’s argument. This is a simple logic chain. You must assign some value to Jones to determine where he should appropriately go in the draft. And that value must align with the perception of the rest of the league. There is no risk-free returns in the draft. You must measure Jones’s value against some pre-determined mean/average.

  43. “I am not sure that the case is closed.

    If the argument is that you can reliably identify all-world hall-of-fame talents like Giannis or Brady, then sure, you should pick them. However, as with Dan Jones, the statistical profile of these three players before entering the draft does not suggest that they would be such talents. And if you can’t identify the statistical outlier, then the process isn’t repeatable. Now, if you are saying that Gettleman is using the “eye-test” effectively, then the conversation pretty much ends there. If you are a regular reader of this blog and believe in the effectiveness of the eye-test, I’m not about to change your mind.”

    Eye test shmy test. You have to evaluate the entire situation.

    Jones played in a conference where Clemson, Florida State, Miami, Louisville, Georgia tech and Va Tech always got superior athletes. In football it is difficult to produce outstanding passing stats if you receivers can’t get separation vs superiorly athletic DB’s

    But Jones had all the measurables, the accuracy, the armstrength and the ability to take a weekly ass whippin in the pocket and never lose his poise and most importantly on the next level the ability to process information and go through his progressions with all hell breaking loose around him.

    This isn’t some nebulous eye test…. this is evaluating reality and what is important on the next level. It’s way more important than putting up huge numbers in some gimmicky pin ball run and shoot offense.

    As to Brady his knock wasn’t his playing stats…. it was his incredibly bad combine numbers. He couldn’t sprint in a straight line very fast. he ran a 5.28 40 which put him in the bottom 1%. He looked worse with his shirt off tham me and I’m 68.

    But he withstood the mental stress of the Drew Henson nonsense and led Michigan to a huge come from behind win in his life’s biggest game the Orande Bowl vs Alabama theowing 4 td’s and 396 yards….. he could process…

  44. I d prefer to be lucky during an earthquake and good as a GM in the NBA.
    But that’s just me.

  45. I think a GM should determine his own risk profile on a case-by-case basis. With Jones, he may have felt that there was not enough risk to trade up, but too much to trade down. It doesn’t have to be binary or absolutist.

    I see nothing wrong with saying at the time what you would have done and not done. But when the guy turns out to be really good, calling it dumb luck seems unnecessarily shallow and self-serving. Why not just humbly say “well, I would have done that one differently, but he did draft what turned out to be a #6-caliber QB at #6, so let’s give him credit for that…” and move on to things like breaking the cap on Solder?

    For my part, if the Knicks draft Kira Lewis Jr. at #3 and he turns out to be a stud, I promise that I won’t be pining over how we could have traded down to #16 and still had him plus another good player.

  46. “This isn’t meant as a troll’s argument.”

    Could have fooled me…. and its not a simple chain of logic. Part of the GM’s job is eveauating draft risk. The 4 teams just in front of the Giants (AZ was a lock to take kyler Murray) the JETS and SF had just made big deals for their QB and Oakland and TB had QB’s locked up long term and were minimal risk to take a QB or trade down since very coveted players were available at their spots.

    However he wasn’t confidient Jones would be available at 17 for obvious reasons. Hence… perfectly played by Gettleman.

  47. He thought Jones was special and that is why he drafted him at 6. He didn’t think drafting the pass rusher at 6 and praying Jones was still available at 17 when Washington drafted before us and teams like Denver were sitting at 20 desperately needing a QB (they took lock in the second round) who had the draft capital to move up 4 or 5 slots.

    There’s a difference between “I think someone is special” and “someone is undeniably special.”

    When you’re granted the opportunity to take one of those special guys, you have to do it, imo. If you’re in the top 5, take BPA every time, fill need later.

    A great example of this is the Sacramento Kings. They thought Bagley was special. Luka was undeniable.

    If we had gone BPA every year we’d have Saquon, Josh Allen, and Tua. Assuming Tua’s hip recovers (a fair risk), that’s a lot better than saquon, Jones, and a nice tackle.

  48. could Gettelman really be sure that Jones would be available in the 2nd round, or even 5 picks later?

    I like Jones but he isn’t Peyton Manning. It would have been fine if he wasn’t there later. We would have gotten our QB this year instead. The guy we passed on is a pass rusher who made the pro bowl as a rookie. How are we gonna get one of those?

    Fwiw I’m high on his choice of coach (if it was his choice). Judge has me excited

  49. “I like Jones but he isn’t Peyton Manning.”

    So now to be an excellent pick Jones at #6 has to be a Peyton Manning clone…. my my how goalposts shift to suit an argument

  50. The Jordan documentary isn’t as good as I was hoping it would be. I thought it would spend more time in the locker room and have more behind the scenes vérité instead of backstory and interviews. But the injury stuff was really interesting. I do not remember the 7 minutes per half restrictions at all. I guess that WAS a thing back then.

    Also, we get to see what a burgeoning superstar thought of tanking a season for draft picks. “Be Like Mike” was a tag that made billions, “Be Like Krauss” was not. And Krauss still found a way to move up in the draft to get Pippen. So, in short, I hope Strat saw that and felt vindicated (between bleach cocktails, that it:)

  51. I’m not shifting the goal posts. Your argument assumes that we needed to get Daniel Jones. So we couldn’t have risked not taking him at 6 because he might not have been available at 17.

    The counterpoint is we would have been fine if we didn’t get him at all. Even though he’s good, there’s prospects like him all the time. There were 4 the year before and 4 this year.

  52. “If we had gone BPA every year we’d have Saquon, Josh Allen, and Tua. Assuming Tua’s hip recovers (a fair risk), that’s a lot better than saquon, Jones, and a nice tackle.”

    Good luck with Tua and his five surgeries being a long term proposition. And you needed to have a hip disclcation and an acetabular fracture to have him available @4.

    Also imagine Jones being blocked for by the likes of Jedrick Willis and throwing to speedballs like Jeudy and Ruggs…….rather than his Dukie players……

    And I’m not sure what makes you so sure Josh Allen is a better player than Jones in the first place. You realize Allen has the benefit of Yannick Ngakoue demanding double teams on his defense. You also have no idea if the Giants had a higher grade on Jones.

  53. ” There were 4 the year before and 4 this year.”

    I’ll be happy to call bullshit on that. The #1 picks weren’t available so scratch Burrow and Murray.

    There isn’t a single other QB in the last 3 drafts I would trade Jones for. Good luck keeping Tua heathy with his surgery on both ankles and hip BEFORE he sets foot on an NFL field.

  54. Well, on the bright side, unless Judge is a miracle worker I think it’s reasonable to expect something between 4 and 7 wins next year and another good pick.

    If he stops making monumental blunders like the Leonard Williams trade (I notice you haven’t touched that one, which is wise), we could be in very good shape this time next year.

    With the savings he netted by getting rid of Beckham and the overpaid safety whose name I already forgot… plus the benefit of his two biggest mistakes, Williams and Solder, rolling off the cap… he’ll be in prime position to fix the defense via the draft and free agency next year.

    By failing to maximize value, he eliminated his margin of error. But if he hits home runs on 90% of his draft picks, he won’t need that margin. The only two picks that stand out as questionable players are the corners, Baker and Beal.

  55. “If he stops making monumental blunders like the Leonard Williams trade (I notice you haven’t touched that one, which is wise), we could be in very good shape this time next year.”

    I don’t know why you think test driving a good starting NFL DL is a monumental blunder for a 3rd and a next year’s 5th. You don’t like his salary?

    DJ Reader just signed a 4 yr 53M deal with CIN. That’s market value. Which player do you like better as they are the same age:

    https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/R/ReadD.00.htm

    https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/W/WillLe02.htm

  56. Not advocating a Perry dismissal in any way, but as crazy as this sounds- if Aller is as good as his rep as a capologist, I wouldn’t mind having an Isaiah Thomas as a GM for drafting and player acquisition. It’s a half joke, but if he has guys that will tell him no, I have more faith in his talent acquisition than Scott Perry. I do think the Aller hire is a smart hire, but it’s not the same as a successful hire. We’re nowhere near where Cleveland was when he worked his magic. But on the surface, it’s a smart hire

  57. I recall that a Thomas team came close to making the playoffs but was undone by injury. That doesn’t sound so horrible to me. Although of course I don’t want him back, by Knick standards that’s probably an above average result.

    By the way, is anyone else worried that Rose wants to cut back on the scouting staff?

  58. The Honorable Cock Jowles:
    Any GM that turns this team into a playoff team deserves a Noble prize.

    Hey, he was just being sarcastic. “Webster’s dictionary defines ‘noble’ as…”

    He totally MEANT to say “noble.” He was totes doing a pun thing, that clever wordsmith scamp. He KNOWS that journalists don’t get Nobel prizes, duh! Of COURSE they get Pulitzers.

    Doesn’t anybody get sarcasm anymore? Jeez.

  59. I do like the idea of using “it was sarcasm” to deflect from any stupid thing I do.

    “Why is this dollhouse stuck on my head? Perhaps you’ve never heard of a little thing called SARCASM?”

  60. Hey, he was just being sarcastic. “Webster’s dictionary defines ‘noble’ as…”

    He totally MEANT to say “noble.” He was totes doing a pun thing, that clever wordsmith scamp. He KNOWS that journalists don’t get Nobel prizes, duh! Of COURSE they get Pulitzers.

    Doesn’t anybody get sarcasm anymore? Jeez.

    “And then I deleted those tweets, so they didn’t happen!”

  61. By the way, if we’re supposed to buy their nonsense about how his tweets are part of the presidential record, then why is he allowed to delete the ones that embarrass him?

  62. It’s sad how fans are now looking back at the Woodson/Melo years as some sort of golden age. I guess everything is relative, and sure they had some good older role players on that team, but Jesus Christ…

  63. 2012-13 was a legitimately good team on the back of Melo’s best season (by far). It just wasn’t built to last — Shumpert (22) was the only rotation player under the age of 27. Seven players had >10 seasons of experience. Four of those players had been in the league for >15 years. Hell, our only two rookies were 28 and 35.

    It was about as win-now as you can get. And it only takes two words to prove that the front office saw it the same way: Andrea Bargnani.

  64. “Wait, you thought I was serious about David Lee being a perennial NBA All Star? That’s just the crazy fake news. Everyone knows that I talked for years about how he was the worst defense, possibly ever.”

  65. FYI, MSG is showing Linsanity all week.

    They had been showing replays of all of the Knicks 2019-2020 home victories, but ran out of content pretty quickly lol.

  66. If the Knicks end up at 6, I think they might go for Hayes. Idk how you can justify trading up in this draft, but that doesn’t mean they won’t do it, probably for LaMelo.

    If they slip to 7 or 8, I’m guessing it will be Haliburton. #9 could be interesting though. If all the good guards are gone, I’d go for Vassell because of his defense and 3pt shooting. They might even want to trade down for him if they don’t believe in the top pgs and look for one later in the draft.

    Then maybe they can grab Jalen Smith with the late first and Malachi Flynn in round 2.

  67. I read an interesting article on nylon calculus that takes a crude look at team shot quality based on shot clock-the Knicks turn out to have taken roughly league average quality shots but were terrible at making them.

  68. Turns out the Lakers are a small business in need of federal payroll assistance.

    I wonder how this makes the Pelicans feel?

  69. Donnie Walsh:
    Turns out the Lakers are a small business in need of federal payroll assistance.

    I wonder how this makes the Pelicans feel?

    As a small business owner who applied for those grants, and was denied for lack of funding, that shiat makes my blood boil. Screw the Lakers for taking money meant to help small businesses. Even taking the money and paying it back means that process is delayed, which can be critical for many business owners. Super scummy.

  70. I didn’t really get into basketball into I was in my teens. So the Woodson Knicks is the best iteration I’ve followed. Turns out getting into the Knicks around 2002 was a terrible choice.

    If Kidd’s legs had held out a little longer I think we’d have made a really good run in the playoffs. Also a lot of those Roy Hibbert “going straight up” calls were BS.

    Team would not have last much longer but we had a legitimate, if still improbable, shot at competing. All we had to do was run it back, maybe add a bit of depth, instead we trade for Bargnani and move away from our dominant 2PG lineup.

  71. I read an interesting article on nylon calculus that takes a crude look at team shot quality based on shot clock-the Knicks turn out to have taken roughly league average quality shots but were terrible at making them.

    That matches my eye test, except for Randle, who seemed to take more difficult shots when they weren’t threes. He took threes when open, he just couldn’t make them. It was the same for all our point guards, they took threes at reasonable opportunities but shot them terribly.

  72. Hey, glad to see you guys are doing alright. I had to take a break for a bit because hearing some of the horror stories was triggering anxiety. Also, I knew some people who got sick – four recovered, but one died. Thankfully, all my family back in NY and in FL are OK.

    This weekend here in LA was a lil tough for me and the fam because of the heat. It felt like we should be going outside to the beach or find a pool to dip into. The news has covered how different counties are handling social distancing when it comes to their beaches. LA County is shut down; Ventura County is enforcing tight distancing requirements on beachgoers, and the OC more or less left it up to individuals to trust in their own distancing.

    He was suggesting there are things that kill the virus quickly (like disinfectants and UVA/B, humidity etc..) and perhaps there is a way to inject SOMETHING into the lungs that would work in the same way, but not specifically Lyson or Clorox.

    I’ll bite on this one, Strat: Part of being a public official is not just crafting what you say but understanding how it may be interpreted. Forgetting everything else about what Trump said for a sec – he should have been aware that it’s at least plausible (and I’m being kind) that some people would interpret his words as saying “we should try to find a way to safely ingest substances like this”, substances that are not intended for consumption at all.
    I’ve read a lot of your posts, Strat. You’re a smart dude. I don’t think you’ve would’ve made the same comments in the same manner Trump did if you were in his shoes. Because even if you didn’t interpret Trump’s comments to suggest drinking Lysol or Clorox, you would know that – in times like these – there are more than a few desperate people who would feasibly forgo common sense (and their own safety) to try anything to beat this virus.

    At best, Trump’s comments were irresponsible for those…

  73. NahNahNahWeAreGoingTheOtherWay: As a small business owner who applied for those grants, and was denied for lack of funding, that shiat makes my blood boil. Screw the Lakers for taking money meant to help small businesses. Even taking the money and paying it back means that process is delayed, which can be critical for many business owners. Super scummy.

    The CARES Act was a thrown together piece of crap if you just look at the way it was written, although the actual providing of funds is good. But there’s so many holes in the statute that Eddy Curry could Waltz through it. I’m not surprised a lot of companies took advantage of it even if I’m furious they did. At 1% interest rate & 6 months deferment there’s a lot of companies that could benefit from it without any intention of using it for payroll.

  74. KnickfaninNJ: That matches my eye test, except for Randle, who seemed to take more difficult shots when they weren’t threes.He took threes when open, he just couldn’t make them.It was the same for all our point guards, they took threes at reasonable opportunities but shot them terribly.

    Even with Randle he took a decent number of threes, he just sucks at them. It’s not surprising when we have RJ, Randle, Payton, Frank, et al. hoisting three pointers.

  75. I don’t know why you think test driving a good starting NFL DL is a monumental blunder for a 3rd and a next year’s 5th. You don’t like his salary?

    I’ve stayed out of this because while I am a Giants fan who watches games and nominally follows transactions etc., I can’t claim to know a lot about the machinations of football front offices.

    Having said that, even I knew the Williams trade was awful the second the ink was dry. A horrible team has no business “test driving” a disappointing DL at the cost of two picks. This is Asset Management 101 and anyone defending it has made clear they’re just reflexively defending Gettleman (what a weird thing to do, but perhaps not more so than reflexively defending Phil Jackson, so can’t say it’s something I’ve never encountered).

    He was either going to be expiring or franchise tagged–Gettleman wound up going with the latter and Williams is now filing a grievance because they mislabeled his position to save money. So that dude will likely not be coming back after this year, a year in which we win a maximum of, what, 7 games?

    The only other possibility is he uses the leverage he gained when Gettleman foolishly donated two picks to the Jets for him to ink an above-market extension after tallying half a sack in 2019. Woo hoo!

    Also, I’ve noticed you think that Daniel Jones has somehow already vindicated his draft selection. That’s…simply false. The jury is still very much out. His rookie season was fine by rookie QB standards and that’s about all you can say. If he doesn’t get a lot better, he’ll have been an awful use of the 6th overall pick just as it seemed at the time.

  76. bobneptune: I don’t know why you think test driving a good starting NFL DL is a monumental blunder for a 3rd and a next year’s 5th. You don’t like his salary?

    That pick was a really good asset, likely a four year starter at a steep discount. And the value of “test-driving a free agent” is negligible.

    It was kind of like the Knicks trade for Mudiay, only if we had given up a lottery protected first instead of a second, and done it in his walk year instead of with 1.5 years left.

  77. Early Bird, I agree. The only guys who seemed good at three pointer ms and had significant minutes were Portis and Morris. If we could get Portis to come back on a cheaper contract, I could see doing that. He was bad on defense, but it’s useful having a big off the bench who can shoot threes

  78. Ha. Seems like coincidental and simultaneous posts by me and TNFH accidentally support the “Greek Chorus” notion.

  79. thenoblefacehumper: Also, I’ve noticed you think that Daniel Jones has somehow already vindicated his draft selection. That’s…simply false. The jury is still very much out. His rookie season was fine by rookie QB standards and that’s about all you can say. If he doesn’t get a lot better, he’ll have been an awful use of the 6th overall pick just as it seemed at the time.

    For my part, I’m not vindicating the pick, just saying that the pick should be judged by how Jones plays going forward and not nitpicked if he plays reasonably well.

  80. I, and probably most, Jets fans were pretty happy to get a 3rd (and an early one, at that) and a 5th for Leo Williams. He’s been okay but never came close to living up to his billing as The Best Player in the Draft(tm).

    Most Jets fans were hoping for a 4th or a 5th.

  81. (z-man chokes back vomit)

    If — and it’s a big if — the team actually wants to build around RJ and Mitch, they are probably better off taking Haliburton or Vassell.

    Btw, LaMelo just signed on with Jay-Z’s sports management group, Roc Nation. I’m unsure if that means anything to Rose and Co. or not.

  82. so much for not bingeing out on the wire this weekend…blew through season 2…

    man, that marshmallow test shit just fucks me up every time…it’s like i’m not even battling against any kind of normal sweet smores ready jet-puffed marshmallow, or, even them cute little freeze dried marshmallows you find in your cocoa (not that anyone here would ever stoop to using packaged cocoa :)…

    no man, i’m in a daily full on battle with that evil grinning stay puft monster from ghostbusters…kicks my ass all the time…

    one positive – no more listening to tom waits creaky and creepy voice singing way down in the hole…sorry tom, i know there are lots of folks out there who just love ya…and yeah, them neville bros boy, sure do sound good…

  83. Every Jets fan I know was ecstatic to get value like that for Williams. Again, defending that particular transaction is simply a sign you’ve anointed yourself a defender of Gettleman’s honor. It’s less defensible than the Solder contract, IMO.

  84. If we are picking at #7 or 8, I’m starting to warm up to Okoro as a pick. Still need to do more research but if he was indeed the best perimeter defender in college basketball and has at least some offensive potential, he’s worth a real good look.

  85. I think Vassell is an interesting prospect, but we shouldn’t be thinking about him with our own pick barring a trade down. The shooting samples are too small to draw much of a conclusion and if he’s not a 40%+ guy he’s suddenly a shaky proposition. I’d love him if he slipped, but couldn’t justify it with out own pick with at least one of Hayes/Haliburton/Okongwu still on the board.

    Hard no on Okoro. I have no idea what anyone sees in this guy. He’s a god awful shooter, rebounder, and there are no defensive stats that back up the reputation.

    Jalen Smith is one of my favorite semi-realistic options with the Clippers’ pick. Hard to imagine he’ll make it past the combine still being mocked around there though–his standout skills are just too highly sought. I’d give him a look anywhere after 7-8 in this draft.

  86. I don’t even care about offensive potential. Our last three lottery picks have been so bad on offense that I would take a defensive stud with a limited but competent catch-and-shoot game. If he dribbles as often (and looks as bad doing it) as Klay Thompson, I’d be fine with that.

  87. At the draft position we are likely to have, getting one of a defensive stud or a competent catch and shoot player would be reasonable. Getting a player who can do both would be a home run n

  88. What people say about Okoro’s defense is intriguing, but I have no idea how good he actually is and if you can’t shoot threes at the wing positions you’re useless.

    To wit, teams keep dumping Moe Harkless, a solid defender, and willingly give up a 1st for someone to take him off their hands. Harkless makes $11 million which is more than he’s worth but also not obscene for a decent wing.

  89. We really really need some guys who can throw the ball into the basket. Every year we draft some dude with like a .430 eFG%. Defense is nice and all but it’s hard to win when the only guy who can throw the ball into the basket can only do it when he’s one foot from the basket.

    Give me Halliburton if we get our usual shitty low lottery pick.

  90. I’d be fine with Haliburton as well, just not as a PG. His shooting mechanics are a real turn-off, but it does go in.

    I don’t ever remember a mock draft season that didn’t have even a consensus top-3 pick and the variability through the lottery is so pronounced. I think Edwards is the closest to a sure-fire top-3 pick (irregardless of whether he deserves it) and one or both of LaMelo and Wiseman are with him in the top-3 in most drafts. Everyone else is all over the place, and for all the years you need a combine and a tournament, this is the one. I guess it makes it more likely that one of the top players will fall out of the top-6, but it’s crazy to try and figure out who that guy will be. Are any of the top PGs on the board surely better than Kira Lewis Jr.? Is Anthony Edwards definitely going to have a better career than Aaron Nesmith? Is Precious better than Okongwu?

  91. Brief pivot to Bakingville, if I may… I got this baking steel on Xmas (thanks to Jowles & Dred), and was thinking of doing unusual things with it since it’s so damn hot. You guys ever do non baking stuff on this? The other day I took the outer layers off some brussel sprouts, mixed em up with some olive oil and salt, and burned the shit out of them on the steel. Ended up with some delicious chips. Not sure if that was dumb. I guess I could have just done it in a steel pan, too.

  92. I think the real detriment of not having the tournament is that some of the elite players who weren’t high ranking recruits don’t get their moment to shine. If a player like Haliburton makes the tournament and does what he’s been doing all of a sudden his draft stock skyrockets.

    I still think the players are out there, the mock drafts just refuse to look passed their high school ranking priors.

  93. Also, PSA: the complete current season of better call Saul is for sale on prime for twenty bucks.

  94. I’m not quite sure why some posters seem to be writing off RJ Barrett as a lost cause. No doubt he shot horribly this season, and if you think he’s gonna put up a TS% of .479 every year, then yes, he’ll go down as one of our worst picks ever. I’m a little more optimistic, and willing to give a 19 year old kid the benefit of the doubt.

    Next season will be critical, if he does a 2nd year Kevin Knox imitation then we are surely doomed.

  95. I didn’t think highly of RJ coming out of college so him continuing to suck is par for the course. I’m not sure why that would change now.

    I’m still giving him a 2nd year, rookies tend to be terrible, but I don’t see him doing much ever. I think the strongest arguments in RJs favor are (1) like Frank he’s so young he may eventually develop into something, and (2) our players don’t fit his drive-heavy, ball-dominant playstyle.

  96. I’m not down on RJ, he showed physical and mental toughness, great footwork, an improved right hand, and something that looks like a shot that can go in more regularly with hard work.. He didn’t look like a deer in the headlights out there, especially compared to Frank and Knox. It just looks like his ceiling is much, much lower than Zion or Ja, and we were so close to getting one of them you could taste it.

  97. the complete current season of better call Saul is for sale on prime for twenty bucks.

    finished up this season of BCS a week or two ago…vince gilligan just doesn’t disappoint…

    similar to other really good shows like breaking bad or boardwalk empire – the supporting characters/cast are almost always engaging…

  98. Not sure if that was dumb.

    hmmmm, consuming brussel sprouts, even with olive oil, sea salt and buried in bbq or ranch doesn’t really seem so wise to me…

    and brussel sprouts disguised as chips…you ain’t fooling me with that…potatoes disguised as chips, now you’re talking…

    i can get behind the potato pretty well…french fries to vodka…oh hell yeah…

  99. I guess D-Wade is the ideal for RJ, in which case Haliburton is probably the best fit in the backcourt with him. That shot is slow and weird, though, and he seems pretty frail, so I’m not totally sold on him yet. Either he or Vassell seem like good fits around RJ. I like Smith too. But I’m sure the Knicks, as usual, won’t consider advanced stats during the drafting process… so let it be Cole Anthony, He of Blood from thy Ground.

  100. and brussel sprouts disguised as chips…you ain’t fooling me with that…potatoes disguised as chips, now you’re talking…

    Yeah but burnt potato isn’t very tasty. These tasted like pure char, oil, and salt. It was surprisingly delicious.

  101. as the wise mister phantom tollhouse cookie milo recently said – be true to yourself…or something like that…or shit, maybe what he said had nothing to do with any of that at all…it’s hard to tell sometimes with milo…plus, who can keep track of all these words…

    i myself kind of like my steak well-done and sort of dried out, kind of like beef jerky…i know, that’s like its own kind of sin…on the rare occasion when i do go out to a decent steakhouse, i’ll order it medium, just for appearances and so people don’t think i’m some sort of madman…

  102. I made steak tonight, too. East village legend Frank Prisinzaro has been posting cooking lessons on Instagram all lockdown. Check out his highlights. I’ve been using the brown butter method for steaks and following his tips for seared salmon, too. Some of the best meals I’ve ever made.

  103. geez hubie, you’re a male model who knows money, keeps a clean house, and can cook…seeing how jowles is already taken, what’s up with you man…you don’t need like a roommate or anything do ya???

  104. ess-dog: I guess D-Wade is the ideal for RJ

    I don’t see Wade, he was a better quick-twitch athlete with an uncanny shot-making ability. Maybe a smarter Demar DeRozan?

  105. well, considering the value in that (as long as most of the original parts are still functioning okayish) – not too shabby sir…

    crank it up…

  106. Z-man: I don’t see Wade, he was a better quick-twitch athlete with an uncanny shot-making ability. Maybe a smarter Demar DeRozan?

    Most say that DeRozan is also a “too athletic” comp… maybe a better-passing Rudy Gay? Basically a ball-handling wing that can distribute, drive, and draw fouls but doesn’t shoot real great.

  107. I do brussel sprouts that way…slice’m in half …coat in olive oil, salt, pepper and go at 425…gettem crisp…the outer leaves are very tasty..

    speaking of potatoes…I also like to get them chip like…I slice the potatoes thin…then grease a pryrex baking dish and bake at high heat…the side down gets real crisp and the top is a little softer…nice compo of crunch chip and softer top….

  108. Tips for the perfect roasted potatoes:

    1) Use yukon golds or another high-starch potato cut into quarters or sixths. Red potatoes are waxy and they don’t crisp well. They’re potatoes — stop trying to make them healthier than they should be.

    2) Put a small amount of baking soda in your boiled water (along with the shitton of salt you should have in there, too). It will break down the starches to make a more textured roasted potato. Maybe a 1/2 tsp.

    3) After parboiling — soft enough to push fork in without the whole thing crumbling — toss them in oil or butter or animal fat with salt, pepper and the aromatics of your choosing (we usually make a mixture of EVOO and butter infused with garlic, thyme and a little rosemary, strained out after the infusion) until the outside looks like mashed potatoes. Really toss the shit out of them.

    4) Bake at 400 or so, flipping once in the middle of the cook time. The parts that are touching the tray will crisp pretty good, so watch carefully so as not to burn them.

    I hope at least one person tries this so they can report back and validate this method. People become positively tumescent when they have my potatoes. I didn’t invent it but it is the method for home cooks. It’s a french fry on the outside and mashed potato on the inside.

  109. …………………PTS TRB AST FG% FG3% FT% eFG%
    RJ Barrett 14.3 5.0 2.6 40.2 32.0 61.4 51.4
    Other Guy 12.0 5.1 4.3 46.6 33.4 70.9 44.5

    Other Guy has had a long career.

  110. Right-o. Nice catch. I know it’s been said here before, but that just seems a good comp. Strong, somewhat ground-based game, moves purposefully, good game sense, but mediocre shooter. RJ’s assists are low, but I think that’s an artifact of being a rookie in a hyper-fast league, and playing with shite teammates. He already has higher pointz per. I’d say he has a real chance of being a good deal more, but at worst there’s an NBA player in there.

  111. Iguodala was a pretty good scorer in his prime. He’s just had a long career so the average is dampened by the early and late years.

  112. True on the scorer aspect for Andre, too. But despite starting every game (!) of his freshman and sophomore years in the NBA, he averaged 9.0 and 12.3 ppg. After that he jumped into the 18 and 19s.

  113. I like the rest of RJ’s game other than his scoring. If he gets the scoring to a reasonably efficient level he’ll be a nice player. The rest of his game is pretty well-rounded and I like his intangibles— seems like he works hard and is ambitious.

  114. Iguodala and Barrett have similar rebound, assists, and blocks numbers their rookie years. And neither were great shooters, but as a rookie, Iguodala was a great finisher. Half his shots came at the rim and he made 70% of them. Barrett, on the other hand, took less than 40% of his shots at the rim and only made 55% of them.

    Now, Iguodala was a bit older and played with better teammates, but it’s still not the greatest comp because it ignores the one thing that Iguodala excelled at. Those are extraordinary finishing numbers for a guard. Dwayne Wade didn’t even put up numbers like that until he was much older.

  115. Is anyone else stuck at home with kids under 7? I love them, but man does this suck. After they go to sleep I stare at a wall for 40 minutes, no exaggeration. I’m done. I’m tired. I don’t want to go to sleep bc at 7 it all starts over again. And it’s week 6. (Yes I know we are lucky for many reasons at this time… but knowing that has stopped helping. I’m numb)

  116. wetbandit:
    Is anyone else stuck at home with kids under 7? I love them, but man does this suck. After they go to sleep I stare at a wall for 40 minutes, no exaggeration. I’m done. I’m tired. I don’t want to go to sleep bc at 7 it all starts over again. And it’s week 6. (Yes I know we are lucky for many reasons at this time… but knowing that has stopped helping. I’m numb)

    For a while I had 3 kids under 7 and my wife worked evenings. It was a bitch…joyous, but grueling. I doubt that covid makes it all that much harder…

  117. that’s a whole bunch of continuous cooking and cleaning there wetbandit…hopefully you have a partner that’ll help carry a bit of that weight…cuz, it’s a heavy heavy load to carry…not sure if you’re trying to work from home now too, but, yeah let’s pile that virus shit right on top of everything else…

    when things get tough, i’ll usually go hide in the bathroom for a while…and post :)

  118. My kid is almost 2 and his mom is working full time from home so I have him all day. It’s fucking harrowing. Today was like 14 straight hours of wrangling that little dude.

  119. this bit of dialogue comes from this movie called clockers…there’s this one character played by isiah washington that’s in the box being interrogated by a couple of detectives for a murder…he’s a “good” guy trying to do right, busting his ass working two jobs and trying to get himself and his family out of the projects…

    Det. Rocco Klein: You’re so close,
    you never walked
    by on a hot day
    with your two kids?

    Stopped in for a soda?

    Victor Dunham: With my two kids?
    I barely see my two kids.
    I’m always working.
    When I get home, I’m exhausted.

    Do you have any kids?

    Det. Rocco Klein: Yeah. I have
    a two-year-old daughter.

    Victor Dunham: Have you ever
    come home so tired
    you hated the sound of
    your own kids cryin’?

    Your own flesh and blood.

    from the day i heard him speak those lines they stayed with me, long before the godkids ever came in to my life…that feeling of being “tired”…something that sometimes all the love in the world won’t make go away…

    just noticed richard price who’s name i’ve seen on the wire credits, also wrote the screenplay for clockers

  120. Donnie Walsh: Iguodala and Barrett have similar rebound, assists, and blocks numbers their rookie years. And neither were great shooters, but as a rookie, Iguodala was a great finisher. Half his shots came at the rim and he made 70% of them. Barrett, on the other hand, took less than 40% of his shots at the rim and only made 55% of them.

    I think the comp is a pretty good one. Iggy was a monster dunker in his younger day and more explosive athlete, but both are strong, smart players who aren’t the best shooters but do a lot of good things on both ends. Iggy was less heralded coming in so he was more humble, while RJ was a superstar recruit and probably has been brainwashed into thinking of himself as a future top 5-10 player even though it seems that he will top out at a low-level all-star at best, i.e. Iggy level.

    As to finishing, in Iggy’s younger days, the 3 was less in vogue and finishing strong was more valued. In short order he went from shooting 45+% of his shots at the rim in his first 2 years to between 25-35% in most years after that, although still at a high %. He was also more than a year older. than Barrett when he was drafted. Barrett shot 57% from 0-3 feet, which is not bad for a 19yo rookie. It’s not the 69% that Iggy shot, but it’s promising. It will be interesting to see whether Barrett develops.

  121. I like the rest of RJ’s game other than his scoring. If he gets the scoring to a reasonably efficient level he’ll be a nice player. The rest of his game is pretty well-rounded and I like his intangibles— seems like he works hard and is ambitious.

    Yeah, me, too. I was pleasantly surprised by a lot of his game this year, but the scoring was just so bad. If he could become a competent scorer, he’s basically an All-Star.

    But will it happen?

  122. “thenoblefacehumper: Also, I’ve noticed you think that Daniel Jones has somehow already vindicated his draft selection. That’s…simply false. The jury is still very much out. His rookie season was fine by rookie QB standards and that’s about all you can say. If he doesn’t get a lot better, he’ll have been an awful use of the 6th overall pick just as it seemed at the time.”

    Last season in QBR Jones finished one tenth of a point behind the GOAT Tom Brady and 3.2 points ahead of 3 time NFL MVP Aaron Rodgers. He did this playing behind a piss poor OL , with Barkley missing 4 games and playing on one good leg for another 4 or five with no other running back of note on the roster. AND his receiving corps…. Golden tate missed the first 4 games, then Evan Engram went out with a lisfranc foot injury and sterling Shepard had his brains scrambled 3 times and played about 15 minutes. Throwing to a bunch of crips and feebs (other than Slayton) Jones played great.

    With all that going on he finished with a QBR a parsec ahead of the great Sam D’arnold. Yeah…. he proved nothing to anyone last year…. only those who won’t look at objective facts.

    As to Leonard Williams I posted a comp FA that signed at a figure in the Williams ballpark. The have til July 15th to sign him long term. Hey…. he isn’t reggie White as some thought but you won’t likely find a durable run stopping pocket pressuring DT in the 3rd round.

  123. Last season in QBR Jones finished one tenth of a point behind the GOAT Tom Brady and 3.2 points ahead of 3 time NFL MVP Aaron Rodgers. He did this playing behind a piss poor OL , with Barkley missing 4 games and playing on one good leg for another 4 or five with no other running back of note on the roster. AND his receiving corps…. Golden tate missed the first 4 games, then Evan Engram went out with a lisfranc foot injury and sterling Shepard had his brains scrambled 3 times and played about 15 minutes. Throwing to a bunch of crips and feebs (other than Slayton) Jones played great.

    With all that going on he finished with a QBR a parsec ahead of the great Sam D’arnold. Yeah…. he proved nothing to anyone last year…. only those who won’t look at objective facts.

    I am not sure “by one metric, Jones was almost the 17th best QB in the league last year” is a rock-solid argument for picking him 6th overall. He was 18th in QBR, 20th in passer rating, and 26th in adjusted yards per pass attempt. This all speaks to my point–if he doesn’t improve, and rather substantially at that, the pick will look just as bad in hindsight as it did at the time.

    As to Leonard Williams I posted a comp FA that signed at a figure in the Williams ballpark. The have til July 15th to sign him long term. Hey…. he isn’t reggie White as some thought but you won’t likely find a durable run stopping pocket pressuring DT in the 3rd round.

    I cannot believe I’m even interacting with someone defending this utterly clownish move. Yeah, they have until July 15th to sign him to a deal they could’ve just waited until he was a free agent to offer him. The only difference now is they feel more obligated to give him a deal he likely won’t justify, because they surrendered a ton of value for him. Guess it was too important to “test drive” him in a season in which they won 4 games.

  124. geo:
    geez hubie, you’re a male model who knows money, keeps a clean house, and can cook…seeing how jowles is already taken, what’s up with you man…you don’t need like a roommate or anything do ya???

    I’m definitely not a male model! I hope you know that :)

  125. Wetbandit, my kids are 9 and 11, and I have to say, things have just turned a corner recently, and the grueling caregiving has lightened up. They are both girls, which probably helps.
    Divorce is brutal in many ways, but one thing that it’s been good for is the new “on/off” schedule of taking care of the kids. I’ve gotten some of my life back from it. I remember the early years were so tough, particularly negotiating jobs and duties with your partner and feeling like the work never ends.
    Just know that there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

  126. Yea thanks guys. Fell asleep right after that vent, and been dealing with bad Zoom app connectivity issues for the past hour. Kids weren’t happy. Got 2 girls (age 6 and 2, woo boy theyre a handful. One emotionally and one will climb and jump off the fridge if she could), a Mrs. Bandit (but is pregnant with our 3rd. Takes us a while and a lot of MD help for us to get pregnant so we’re happy, and we just found out before this shitstorm started so it gives us a little inner peace. The catch is that my wife was told to take it easy, so I’m stuck with a lot of the work at home.) I’m also taking a lot of call for my specialty at a couple local hospitals but thankfully my residents are really good so I haven’t had to go in that often. It’s been real busy at home though :)

  127. For those of you with little ones at home, these sites may help. All have been vetted and used by teaching peers ( and former elementary school students of mine) and are free. Many are useful for 3K through middle school
    Picture book read alouds by a variety of actors and actresses
    https://www.storylineonline.net/
    Indoor Phys Ed. via dancing and games:
    https://www.gonoodle.com/
    Educational Videos and games
    https://www.abcya.com/
    Games and Videos
    https://www.funbrain.com/
    Mathematics through video games
    https://www.coolmath4kids.com/
    Video games that teach coding concepts
    https://code.org/learn

  128. These are awesome, thanks Bo.
    Another repository of lists good apps/activities is commonsensemedia.org – been very happy with the quality of a bunch of the apps on there. Between zoom and YouTube sessions given by the schools, our small apartment, and adding a bunch of apps—— I really wonder about the long term ramifications of this ordeal. Hopefully this is over by the next school year and kids brains are plastic enough that it’s all forgotten …

  129. IMO keep your kids reading and you have little to worry about (excluding the social isolation). It’s the kids who are in cramped apartments with no meaningful supervision and a lack of quiet space that I’m worried about.

    This is a great chance to instill the discipline to read in silence for progressively longer periods of time.

  130. Yeah, we do quiet reading daily. So far we’re up to ten minutes before all hell breaks loose. Or something else breaks.

  131. I am divorced with an 8 year old and 6 year old and have been quarantining WITH my ex wife for the last 5 weeks. It’s like a 24 hour per day deja vu. Haven’t been able to be on the blog much lately. Nice to see things have not changed much!

  132. I have a 2 and and 4 year old here (among others). I’ve actually enjoyed putting them to bed every night and making every meal for them. I am way more appreciative of this age than I was when my older kids were babies. Part of me is going to miss this should things ever return to normal…

    (You’ll look back on this when your girls are preteens, wetbandit, and wish the lockdown had gone on just a little bit longer:)

  133. Re: RJ, he gets a surprisingly small amount of virtual ink here for a guy we just took 3rd overall and is going to be crucial to our future one way or another. I mean compare the amount of discussion about him to the amount about Frank Ntilikina, who will be playing in another country soon.

    I don’t think he’ll ever be one of the top 2/3 scorers on a good team, but if he embraces the role I could see him becoming a valuable Iguodala-esque glue guy. He should aspire to something like a semi-efficient 15 points, 7 rebounds, 5 assists, and good wing defense.

    If he has free-reign to chuck for the duration of his rookie contract, I could see his next contract being an issue. Gotta do what it takes to keep a Guy Who Can Give You 30 Any Given Night, after all. It’ll be up to the front office to make sure he’s not overpaid. That doesn’t exactly inspire confidence but we shall see.

  134. Zion’s ceiling: 30/8/8 on .650 TS%

    Ja’s ceiling: 25/10/4 on .600 TS%

    RJ’s ceiling: doesn’t take so many shots that he loses the game for you

  135. Donnie- thanks for the sentiment. I actually really enjoy the morning routines and the reading together etc.. but by the end of the day…….

    You tell me I will be glad for this experience when they’re teens… I tell you I will be glad for this experience when they’re dealing with their own rascals and dare to complain to me

  136. cgreene:
    I am divorced with an 8 year old and 6 year old and have been quarantining WITH my ex wife for the last 5 weeks. It’s like a 24 hour per day deja vu. Haven’t been able to be on the blog much lately. Nice to see things have not changed much!

    I think you may actually be in the 10th circle of hell. Surprised they have internet connection down there.

  137. RIP Amoeba Records on Sunset Blvd.

    They were going to be moving to a new location anyway in the near future but it would have been nice to be able to say goodbye to the old place.

  138. The Honorable Cock Jowles:
    Easier said than done, I am aware : )

    Jowles, much respect for your intellectual capability, but you just did a hard core “mansplain” of parenting. I agree that reading to your children and quite time are important. But if you haven’t been a parent, you just don’t know. There are no off-days. You have to live it every single day and every waking hour. I live in a two-bedroom in NYC with a four-year-old and two-year-old. We read to them all the time. The level of energy it takes to even read a book to your child is unthinkable.

  139. Speaking of RJ, I listened to the recent Dunc’d On podcast where they discussed who should be on the all rookie teams, both starters and backups. RJ didn’t make the cut and didn’t get a lot of discussion except that they clearly felt that playing on the Knicks along with the role they gave him was bad for his performance. I can’t argue with this but it makes it hard to predict his future.

  140. a hard core “mansplain” of parenting

    C’mon, now. That’s hyperbole and you know it. Plus, didn’t you see in the initial post that I said that children who are in small spaces (and by extension, their parents as well) are the ones I worry about? And then later, me saying, “Easier said than done?”

    My point was that the personal development that happens while reading is still attainable at home. Nothing about how having kids is easy, especially with young children who by nature have little emotional regulation or impulse control. I may be a fool, but not that foolish.

  141. Iguodala was an elite defender. RJ, not so much

    Iguodala became an elite defender. He didn’t enter the league as one. He was a better defender than Barrett was as a rookie, but it wasn’t as dramatic as all that. The difference, of course, was that Iguodala just kept getting better while we have no idea how Barrett will progress.

  142. Holy shit cgreene that’s insane. I could never, and my girlfriend would dump me even if I could. Godspeed…

    cgreene:
    I am divorced with an 8 year old and 6 year old and have been quarantining WITH my ex wife for the last 5 weeks. It’s like a 24 hour per day deja vu. Haven’t been able to be on the blog much lately. Nice to see things have not changed much!

  143. I live in a two-bedroom in NYC with a four-year-old and two-year-old. We read to them all the time. The level of energy it takes to even read a book to your child is unthinkable.

    This is why I moved upstate. It was too exhausting for all of us. I’m definitely glad they can read to themselves now.

  144. The Honorable Cock Jowles: C’mon, now. That’s hyperbole and you know it. Plus, didn’t you see in the initial post that I said that children who are in small spaces (and by extension, their parents as well) are the ones I worry about? And then later, me saying, “Easier said than done?”

    My point was that the personal development that happens while reading is still attainable at home. Nothing about how having kids is easy, especially with young children who by nature have little emotional regulation or impulse control. I may be a fool, but not that foolish.

    Of course I saw you write “easier said than done”, because I quoted that very line of yours in my post. And of course, I was being hyperbolic. Knickerblogger has to Knickerblog.

    But it’s also true that (extreme example) you can’t say something racist and then say, “but I’m not racist”.

    Mansplaining is mansplaining even if you acknowledge you are mansplaining. I do it all the time. I’m no better.

    Rhetorics aside, the larger issue is the tremendous guilt that comes with being a parent these days. The expectations are sky high. So every time I use my TV as a pseudo baby sitter to get a break from the day, I feel like a shitty parent; and that gets reinforced all the time by non-parents.

  145. Mansplaining is mansplaining even if you acknowledge you are mansplaining.

    Cool, but I flatly reject the accusation.

  146. The way my friend explains parenthood to me:

    “It’s Stockholm syndrome. You’re abjectly miserable 100% of the time and the only way you can justify it is that you love your kid.”

    “You get so little sleep as a parent that your memories don’t encode properly and you can’t remember how awful everything is. Next thing you know you’re telling people how special that time was with your child. I’m starting to think that, but it’s just that you don’t remember the misery.”

    I have literally no idea how parents do it. I can barely remember to feed myself half the time.

  147. You tell me I will be glad for this experience when they’re teens… I tell you I will be glad for this experience when they’re dealing with their own rascals and dare to complain to me

    thank you for saying how i feel sometimes :)

    it’s a lot emotion stuff going on…

  148. NahNahNahWeAreGoingTheOtherWay: Rhetorics aside, the larger issue is the tremendous guilt that comes with being a parent these days. The expectations are sky high. So every time I use my TV as a pseudo baby sitter to get a break from the day, I feel like a shitty parent; and that gets reinforced all the time by non-parents.

    FWIW, there’s research out there that says parents don’t have as much of an impact on their kid as popular culture suggests, really there’s no solid evidence that parents have any effect whatsoever. Short of locking a kid in the basement and not feeding them, kids are hard to screw up.

    Moral of the story is people shouldn’t stress about parenting so much. Society puts an unfair burden on parents because they attribute the success or failure of the kid to them. In reality it’s peer groups and nature that accounts for nearly all outcomes. Relax and enjoy your time with your kid (insofar as that’s at all possible)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Nurture_Assumption

  149. We’re huge readers, and writers, and we have (quick guestimate) about 600 books here visible on shelves, and our kid (11) spends all his time on the screen. I try to lower my parental guilt with the belief that it’s like 60’s rock music: parents hated it, but it didn’t destroy lives (usually). Plus during this period it’s a blessing, he can interact with his friends, there’s endless yelling and howling from the bedroom. The one good thing about a child of this age is when you’re 11, pandemics happen. Puts things in perspective. It’s not the end of the world (at least not like rock music).

  150. Ha, Early Bird, I think you’re talking about, like, parents buying afterschool coding classes versus those who don’t…

    There are plenty of ways to screw young people up, but that’s more along the lines of teaching them to be racist, beating them up, or generally OKing all sorts of awful behavior, directly or implicitly.

    But yeah, if you’re a decent person and deal with your kids’ mental/physical issues, they will most likely be ok people. As for personality, yes, they just come out the way are.

  151. I am a new parent (barely 3 week old daughter).

    It is VERY hard. The nights are impossible. She has had some good nights but we’ve had a majority of nights where she just won’t sleep and cries constantly. My wife and I have both had breakdowns in tears a few times.

    I’m working from home cause of Covid. She has 12 weeks of maternity leave. I can’t for the life of my understand how parents who can’t take off from work do it let alone single moms. Its so horrible that we don’t have any sort of paid maternity and paternity leave in this country.

    I love her. She’s so cute and wonderful and when she’s sleeping in my lap during the day and we’re just hanging out, I love it. But man is it tough. The lack of sleep is very real.

  152. Oh Swift, I’m so sorry. Yeah, that first 3-6 months is a nightmare of exhaustion. And then, as mentioned above, you forget all about it. I’m convinced it’s genetically hardwired. Write your future self a note now, because in a year or two you’ll be going oh, she’s so cute, let’s do it again. Trust me, one’s enough. Plus it’s environmentally responsible — doesn’t matter how much you recycle, drive electric, avoid palm oil, etc., pop another one out and the extraction and impacts dwarf all your other efforts.

  153. My point was that the personal development that happens while reading is still attainable at home.

    time to get weird and personal – i think your star shines really bright mister jowles…i find your ability to recall, analyze data and communicate very unique…your will/force of personality and how you see the world and approach the world is interesting to me…

    what really got me though was when i heard you singing…i just wasn’t expecting that type of pace, control and discipline…not from someone with that much fire in them…

    since then, i’ve always wondered where someone like yourself learns self disciple…

    mom’s a great role model in terms of doing the right thing and her work ethic, but, she spoiled the heck out of me and never really instilled self-discipline…for a long time i just got by on energy, effort and a good disposition…very fortunate to leave the house at 17 to go live with dear ‘ol uncle sam…lots of good mentors wearing a uniform…still took me into my late 20’s to start getting the whole self discipline thing down…heck, i still have trouble with it…

    my guess is that a lot of what got you on your path comes directly from your parents…seems like you have two really good ones…

    besides for all the effort and work – there’s lot of pressure in trying to do your best when it comes to parenting…as far as life stuff goes – what’s at stake couldn’t be more important…parenting is by far the most significant event i’ll ever participate in while i’m here…

    i still though remember being 18, standing with my cousin (who’s about 10 years older) on some pier outside a bar on fire island, him looking me dead in the eye and telling me i should hold off on having kids…

    even though i got in to the game late (about 40 or so), still glad for the opportunity to have children in my life…some moments though – yeah, what wetbandit says…

  154. “It’s Stockholm syndrome. You’re abjectly miserable 100% of the time and the only way you can justify it is that you love your kid.”

    i’m bookmarking this one…

    can’t tell you all how much i really appreciate you all sharing your thoughts and lives…everyone’s words have meant a whole lot to me today…

  155. ess-dog:
    Ha, Early Bird, I think you’re talking about, like, parents buying afterschool coding classes versus those who don’t…

    There are plenty of ways to screw young people up, but that’s more along the lines of teaching them to be racist, beating them up, or generally OKing all sorts of awful behavior, directly or implicitly.

    But yeah, if you’re a decent person and deal with your kids’ mental/physical issues, they will most likely be ok people. As for personality, yes, they just come out the way are.

    That’s just it, there’s no solid evidence that any of that stuff will have a discernible impact. The evidence they do have fails to control for genetics. When controlling for genetics they can’t definitively say that it matters. People just assume that stuff makes a difference. Even as far as teaching racism, there’s plenty of examples of kids who reject their parents politics, religion, and thoughts on race.

  156. time to get weird and personal – i think your star shines really bright mister jowles…i find your ability to recall, analyze data and communicate very unique…your will/force of personality and how you see the world and approach the world is interesting to me…

    We’ll see how this recall works after another few months of WFH, when I’ve had a long streak of microdosing tincture throughout each day.

    It is VERY hard. The nights are impossible. She has had some good nights but we’ve had a majority of nights where she just won’t sleep and cries constantly. My wife and I have both had breakdowns in tears a few times.

    I have a question for parents who have had this happen to them. Obviously nursing mothers can’t sleep through feedings/pumpings, but isn’t it possible to split night duties to ensure that people actually get some sleep?

    I have a friend who insists that it’s a moral responsibility for both he and his wife to take care of the newborn through the nights, with no exceptions. His wife gets up to nurse, and then it’s his responsibility to change the kid if needed. Otherwise it wouldn’t be… fair? Wouldn’t it also be mutually responsible to have one parent sleep through the night (on the couch, let’s say) so they can switch off in the morning and the other can sleep in? At least some of the time, to avoid the mutual enmity that might result from being chronically underslept?

    I’m genuinely curious about the practicality of it. There must be something I’m missing.

  157. are you getting a better handle on what I meant by vapid?

    I was about to say that I’ve reaped what I’ve sown, but it’s like water on a duck’s back over here.

    I have literally no idea how parents do it. I can barely remember to feed myself half the time.

    It’s weird how skills accrete over time if you invest in them. I didn’t know how to cook with any kind of discipline until I was 29. I could make some simple stuff, but I genuinely don’t know how I kept myself fed for a solid decade. Now I can’t imagine a world in which I couldn’t make myself a dozen different weeknight meals off the top of my head.

    I doubt anyone’s prepared to be a parent until they’re a parent. Maybe those kids who had to raise their younger siblings have a leg up, but still, everyone’s just figuring shit out as they go. And some people are bad at figuring shit out, so they just fake it long enough to get their offspring out of the house at 18.

  158. so tell me thcj, if you don’t mind – was it your parents, or, just something you had from the beginning – in terms of self-discipline?

  159. Jowles, infants are LOUD. If your house is big enough and you have bedrooms in distant wings or basements, sure. But even if you try sleeping on the couch, you hear the kid crying, which if you’ve ever flown on a plane is a really hard noise to ignore. And half the time a parent needs to hold the baby and bop around rhythmically, walking up and down to get the creature back to sleep, and the couch is suddenly no longer a safe haven. And frankly, even if you get one decent night of sleep out of two (which rarely happens), one every-other totally broken night just leaves you fatigued if not broken in the long run.

  160. so tell me thcj, if you don’t mind – was it your parents, or, just something you had from the beginning – in terms of self-discipline?

    My parents have the attention spans of newts. Big TV watchers, often in separate rooms where you could hear one TV in the room with the other blaring. Just a horrible place to get any thinking or quiet work done. Imagine a 7-year-old trying (and failing) to practice Hanon exercises on piano while his parents are blasting evening television in the next room — that’s me!

    Thankfully my mom put books in front of me from an early age, owing to her dirt-poor upbringing and fear of intergenerational poverty. I had to develop skills in adulthood that I think are still woefully inadequate. If you compare me to a solid law or medical student, I probably have the attention span of a Candy Crush champion. I’m consistently in awe of the young children I see at chess tournaments who can sit still in total concentration for three hours. I’m the guy who sometimes needs to take a walk around the room mid-match out of mental fatigue.

    Jowles, infants are LOUD. If your house is big enough and you have bedrooms in distant wings or basements, sure. But even if you try sleeping on the couch, you hear the kid crying, which if you’ve ever flown on a plane is a really hard noise to ignore.

    Sure, that’s fair. White noise machines only go so far, and ear plugs are allegedly unsafe to wear for that length of time (ear infections abound).

    And frankly, even if you get one decent night of sleep out of two (which rarely happens), one every-other totally broken night just leaves you fatigued if not broken in the long run.

    I already experience this from a 6:30-4ish workday. Good luck getting me to sleep in past 7 anymore, even on vacation. I can’t fathom being woken up multiple times in that period.

  161. I taught elementary school for 14 years in the South Bronx and East Harlem. I have a sample size of about 400 kids. Obviously, this is all an eye test, but the most important factor that I have observed in whether the children I taught were able to be happy and function optimally ( ie according to their cognitive development at a given moment) is that the child feels loved and cared about. They feel safe and are thus able to take risks and more importantly fail, yet persevere. I have been exposed to a smaller sample size of children ( about 100) from affluent families ( I can walk a quarter-mile in different directions and pass-by $6 million apartments, where the kids go to tony $60K/year private schools or NYCHA housing projects) and have observed the same correlation of underachieving, emotionally distraught children to parents who are not emotionally connected to their children in each disparate demographic. There are latchkey kids in both demographics and they suffer for it. The time the KB parents of young children are spending with them now is being internalized and accruing a strong positive emotional connection that will yield substantial benefits down the road
    As for getting young kids to read ( and I totally agree with THCJ that building stamina is critical and highly challenging because of the myriad of alternatives that kids have ), I found great promise is providing comics and graphic novels during the last three years of teaching. There are a plethora of graphic texts available in all genres and some are on digital platforms that read the text aloud, while the student follows along.

  162. FWIW, there’s research out there that says parents don’t have as much of an impact on their kid as popular culture suggests,

    This is maybe true on the “good parent” end of the spectrum. On the “shitty parent” end of the spectrum the shittiness of the parenting has a huge impact. I have lots of eye test evidence of this.

  163. On the topic of books. Whenever friends or family travel abroad and want to get my kids a toy or keepsake, I always ask that they pick up a book from the local culture. Your kids get exposed to folktales and ethics of different societies, plus they get to see a more diverse set of characters play the hero role. I’m trying to raise my kids in a completely vapid home devoid of outside cultural influences.

  164. that’s interesting…i know there are self-motivated, disciplined individuals from early on, but, my basic belief is that who you are in large part comes from your parents, both in terms of environment and genetics…

    particularly early on in life…

    i don’t know, i need to give what ess-dog, early bird and raven wrote above more thought…some deep and important stuff…

    of all the folks whom i think have the biggest challenge in life – it’s orphans…i can’t imagine growing up without a steady consistent parent…although, there’s no doubt my sister and myself profited a great deal from not having our father as a greater participant in our lives…

    without even one solid parent…whew…

    i have a great deal of respect for you bob – not actually from neptune city…opening your heart and home to a child whom needed a home, and doing it twice, is very commendable…

  165. the most important factor that I have observed in whether the children I taught were able to be happy and function optimally ( ie according to their cognitive development at a given moment) is that the child feels loved and cared about. They feel safe and are thus able to take risks and more importantly fail, yet persevere.

    i never could have said this any better bo…that’s exactly my “feeling” (the “grand parent” approach – love them up)…over the years i’ve adjusted my expectations and demands on the god kids…i’m focused now on them just doing the right things, making safe choices, treating others with respect…

    and, not being fucking lazy, cuz lazy is stupid – so don’t be stupid…just like mom let the word asshole(s) flow pretty freely, the kids endure the word stupid all the time from me…yeah, i have some work to do on my parenting methods :)

    after some input from a friend at work, i’m am being more positive and encouraging during home schooling…geo’s 3rd grade boot camp wasn’t working so well…

  166. “I am a new parent (barely 3 week old daughter).

    It is VERY hard. The nights are impossible. She has had some good nights but we’ve had a majority of nights where she just won’t sleep and cries constantly. My wife and I have both had breakdowns in tears a few times.”

    I don’t know if this applies to your daughter but No 3 son hade just what you describe…. would not sleep and this went on for 6 bloody months. # trips to the pediatrician and an abdominal ultrasound to rule out bizzare shit and nothing worked. Then a friend of my wife said….”Why don’t you try him on a soy based formula?”

    18 hours later…. quiet as a church mouse. I literally wanted to kill the fucking pediatritian.

    Pro tip #2: when all else fails if you have a dryer, hoist junior over your shoulder and hop on top of the dryer (if it is stand alone) and turn it on. I don’t know if its the vibration or the low pitched rumbling sound but it used to work like catnip!

  167. “i have a great deal of respect for you bob – not actually from neptune city…opening your heart and home to a child whom needed a home, and doing it twice, is very commendable…”

    I am sure it might be difficult for some to understand but I have received way more from the last 20 years than I put into it. And I’m sure when I’m breathing my last breath I’m not going to be pissed I made a few less trips to Europe.

    And for those interested it is very cheap…. probably cost us way less than $10,000 all in with lawyers etc. You have no conception how many girls in this country get pregnant and for moral reasons aren’t comfortable with abortion and are deleriously happy to go through the pregnancy and give them up to someone capable of raising their child. Now that’s a selfless act.

  168. I have received way more from the last 20 years than I put into it. And I’m sure when I’m breathing my last breath I’m not going to be pissed I made a few less trips to Europe.

    that’s it right there…

    i bought some melatonin kid’s gummies, but, never used them…i’m sure it’s fine, just a little uncomfortable with the thought…

    the first one i used to walk her around on my shoulder for an hour or so…sometimes we’d take drives around the neighborhood til she fell asleep…the next one – take your ass to bed – now…the third one that’s come along, here i’ll let you keep the tv on til you fall asleep…learned with that one though, i had to make sure to feed him later in the evening – otherwise the little guy would just wander down to the kitchen when everyone was asleep and raid the fridge…

  169. Jowles, I can only speak from my limited experience but while splitting up the time sounds great in theory, in practice its much more difficult. They are really loud when they cry, especially when they reach the point of just freaking out. I’m noticing there is “I’m hungry” or “my diaper needs changing” cries, which are not too bad. But then there’s “I’m upset and past the point of being able to process it” crying which is literally glass shattering loud. I could be in the other room or upstairs with her and if she’s freaking out my wife can still hear her from the bedroom.

    But we have done some switching off. She’s taken her into the living room for a few hours at night so I can sleep and then I’ve taken her for a few hours during the day while I work (the days are easy), so she can sleep. But you never get more than 3 hours at this point (if you’re lucky) because they have to eat every 2 to 3 hours. And she has to pump all those times too. Its crazy!

  170. Also, do people wear earplugs while holding an inconsolable child? Like, not around the house, and certainly not to sleep if on baby duty, but, like, after they start crying, do you just pop a pair in to take the edge off?

  171. I’ll try the dryer trick!

    We are doing breast milk but she is pumping. But I have heard that what she eats can affect it.

    We’ve had some good nights. I just think we’re still in early days. They can’t tell night from day yet, so its hard. She will go out quickly if she is on me or my wife’s chest but we can’t really sleep that way. Its when we put her down in the bassinet she just won’t take it. She’ll settle down and you think she’s asleep and then 10 minutes later. Boom!

  172. So if you’re extra cranky about pre-draft pessimism on the board, we’ll know why.

    ; )

  173. When it comes to sleep, every child is sui generis. You all need to function in sleep deprivation mode like the rest of us did.

  174. Swift I do not envy you at this moment. Damn. We had similar experiences (but definitely not as bad). What worked for us at different times were: burping longer/harder (what I thought was strong was actually wimpy), switching bottles (Dr. Browns ftw), and switching formulas when we were up to that.
    We took the first month to survive and the next month or so to “sleep train” the baby. It’s emotionally difficult but doable and HUGE in the long run.

    So today was a great day until twenty minutes ago. Kids were learning, kindergartner is learning to really read, we went to my in laws house to let em loose in the garden, get some vitamin D, they were LOVING it. Then we got home, and the shower was taking a while to warm so I let my two year old run loose an extra twenty seconds like I usually do. Pee everywhere! How she got it on the top of a counter I don’t know. Then as I was preparing her dinnner for a minute, she decides to drag a chair to her high chair and try to get it. There she is standing on a bending and about to break tray of the damn thing. Then she spilled something chocolatey all over herself while I typed this. All this time the six year old is crying for us to tape the battery compartment closed on her walkie talkie that is working just fine.
    But overall a great day!

  175. Jowles, there’s something scientific that happens to women and men when they’re sleep deprived and postpartum with raging hormones. The mom says fk it you stay up with me asshole, and the dad says I have work in the morning, let’s make a schedule and is never heard from again

  176. Waking up in the night because your kid is crying is different than waking up in the night when you hear a siren outside. When it’s your kid, you don’t just wake up. You get wide awake. Because you are worried that this lifeform you love really needs you. So getting back to sleep can be very difficult. Also, you only half shut your eyes, because you never know (once you get the kid back to sleep), if it’s about to wake right back up. That half-sleep is a mofo.

  177. JK47: This is maybe true on the “good parent” end of the spectrum. On the “shitty parent” end of the spectrum the shittiness of the parenting has a huge impact. I have lots of eye test evidence of this.

    Right, so the argument is that this is actually due to genetics. Parents who struggle to regulate their emotions will have kids who struggle to regulate their emotions. So if a parent has a tendency toward violence, their kid will have a genetic tendency to violence.

    Honestly, I don’t 100% believe the theory the book puts forward. That said, I think it’s interesting and definitely cuts very hard against the cultural assumption. I think the less out there point remains that it’s okay not to stress out about your kid watching a bit of extra TV or being the perfect parent all the time.

  178. I’ve had several batches of kids now. The first few batches we raised with no screen time, lots of reading, lots of outdoor time, lots of family time, lots of discipline. They’ve turned out to be be delightful and amazing people.

    But the newest batch of babies, which came along when we were in our 40s, is getting a totally different experience. They basically do whatever they want, eat what they want, watch what they want, and go to bed when they want. And, honestly, the are just as delightful and amazing for it. And they’ve learned a lot of shit from TV that I never even thought to teach my older ones.

    So, basically, there’s no wrong way. Only right ways, as long as you love your kids and they know it.

  179. CBS Sports headline: “James Dolan, Jeff Wilpon will be on Governor Andrew Cuomo’s New York Re-Opening Advisory Board”

    What could go wrong?

  180. He’s bringing Dolan on as the canary in the coalmine. Whatever ideas Dolan endorses can be fully written off.

  181. You have no conception how many girls in this country get pregnant and for moral reasons aren’t comfortable with abortion and are deleriously happy to go through the pregnancy and give them up to someone capable of raising their child. Now that’s a selfless act.

    I was one of those kids. Adopted through the NY Foundling, for whom I work in my part time. If you’ve ever seen Daryl McDaniels (from Run DMC) documentary on his adoption journey, it’s the same group. That documentary was like a step-by-step guide for me. I called all the people in it and that’s how I found my birthmother.

    Anyway, a tip of the cap to all you parents going through this. The timing of when we should have kids was the reason I ended my last relationship. She wanted to conceive last fall. I wanted to wait until we got married, bought a house, etc. We couldn’t sort it out.

    And here I am now… not locked down with a woman who is 7 months pregnant in her one-room studio.

  182. Why is Lin’s shitty team in 2012 light years ahead of us? Pick and roll everywhere, passing for days, penetrations and handoff/kickouts, Novak my spirit animal… was this the most Chandler gave a shit while on the Knicks? He was so good. Lin was so good. Novak. Landry, Shumpert, Skywalker for 3… that team could beat the shit out of us and look more modern. 8 years.

  183. “Right, so the argument is that this is actually due to genetics.”

    The consensus out there, not that I am endorsing it, is that when it comes to child outcomes peers are about 50% and genetics about 50%. Parental impact is mostly about abuse and neglect and other bad shit. Basically, there is a negative skew to parenting. Parents can, in the immortal words of Philip Larkin, “fuck you up” and that’s about it.

    I don’t really buy it even though I have been making the same argument about NBA coaches for 15 years.

  184. ***I don’t mean to pry but the word “batches” really makes me want to know more.***

    Let’s just say I have more kids than Larry Johnson…. And Shawn Kemp…. And Kenny Anderson…

  185. By the eye test I’m a hella good parent, video analysis revealed many spectacular child-rearing highlights…but advanced stats tell a different story…worrisome inefficiency, tons of wasted possessions, poor assist/TO ratio…probably ranking higher in mocks than deserved in this mediocre KB parent crop…

  186. Why is Lin’s shitty team in 2012 light years ahead of us? Pick and roll everywhere, passing for days, penetrations and handoff/kickouts, Novak my spirit animal… was this the most Chandler gave a shit while on the Knicks? He was so good. Lin was so good. Novak. Landry, Shumpert, Skywalker for 3… that team could beat the shit out of us and look more modern. 8 years.

    That team was excellent on defense. The Linsanity Knicks weren’t a very good offensive team, but they were really good on defense and Lin and the others did just enough on offense for them to win. Shump, Fields, Jeffries and Chandler together were outstanding on defense. They were a swarm, as they could all switch like crazy and play more traditional defense. That was the best usage of Jared Jeffries’ limited skills ever.

  187. Good point, I definitely see that. Also, there were no good shooters, but shot selection was excellent. Probably a D’Anton effect.

  188. That was really a magical time. Just shows how much difference even a “good” PG could make…

  189. That was the all-time Knicks Flash in the Pan team: Jeremy Lin, Steve Novak, Iman Shumpert, Landry Fields, Toney Douglas, Jerome Jordan…

  190. Jeffries was a good player, just a gross overpay and put in too large of a role.

    It was absurd how much teams tried to get him to play the three over his career. Dude was six eleven!!

    In 2006-07, this was the second-most common Knick starting lineup:

    Marbury PG
    Crawford SG
    Jeffries SF
    Frye PF
    Curry C

    Ugh. Ugh. Ugh.

    What’s funny is that they actually had the makings of a modern NBA team if they just dumped Curry and played Frye at the center and Jeffries at the 4 and had a shooter at the 3.

  191. As I recall, I was one of the few who didn’t fully buy into the hype after he got exposed first by Deron Williams and then by the Heat. If you fish around, you’ll find quotes from me questioning his durability and whether he would fare as well once he went around the league a couple of times.

    I also felt that whether I liked it or not, Dolan was justified in not paying like $70 mill in salary plus luxury tax for 3 years of a middling overhyped PG coming off knee surgery; that Morey was dumb to offer him that poison pill contract; and that Lin was dumb to sign it. We can quibble, but I’m pretty comfortable looking back on that take right now, especially considering that Morey had to include a first rounder to dump Lin after publicly humiliating him by hanging a mural of Melo wearing his number 7. It’s pretty ironic to think back on some allegedly smart folks here whining that Dolan picked the wrong time not to grossly overpay for a mediocre overhyped player. (I know, we were capped out, yadayada…)

    But yeah, as a diehard Knicks fan, I relished every minute of Linsanity while it seemed real. I took my son to a game right in the thick of it vs. Atlanta. Lin jerseys were everywhere, and I had two Harvard professors sitting in front of me and a Taiwanese couple who had no interest in basketball sitting next to me. If only it weren’t too good to be true…not to mention how good Shump, Fields and Novak looked during that stretch.

    Seems like we’re a decent PG away from revisiting those times…a young team with heart, cohesion and potential.

    That is, until Rose re-signs Melo, drafts Cole Anthony, and trades Mitch, Barrett and 4 #1 picks for Chris Paul.

  192. Boy, it was a bad idea not to match that Lin offer sheet. Imagine the capped out 2012-13 Knicks with Kidd and Lin as the backcourt. Man, that would have been something. Imagine the Pacers series when the Knicks desperately needed a guard to score if they had a guard who could score. And all for Dolan’s ego (as the theoretical monster luxury tax hit never even happened due to the Knicks trading away players – as if the theoretical monster luxury tax bill was ever anything but a ex post facto explanation, which it wasn’t). It was almost as ill-considered as playing Jared Jeffries at the three for most of his initial tenure here.

  193. I disagree, Brian. We can second-guess and theorize all we want about that, but for all we know, Lin would have either played poorly or have been been beaten up and/or injured long before the Indiana series. We seem to forget that he broke down after 900 minutes and then after his knee recovered he opted to not play in the playoffs so that he could max out in free agency. It would have been a galactic overpay to match that “ridiculous” offer, and not a single GM other than Dolan would have been stupid enough to match it given the luxury tax circumstances, hence the phrase “poison pill.”. Folks here get annoyed that in this case, Dolan wasn’t as stupid as he was for so many other financial moves, and largely didn’t allow us to match out of spite.

    Let’s also not be too quick to gloss over the fact that Lin was not anywhere the same player in 2012-13 as he was during the height of Linsanity. He was a below-average PG for Houston during the regular season and played horrifically in the playoffs for them, and wasn’t much better in 2013-14.

    Sure, I would have loved for Dolan to have matched the offer sheet, who wouldn’t have? But Morey figured that even Dolan wasn’t stupid enough to do it. Lin got the money he wanted, but I believed at the time that he made a terrible career move and in retrospect I can’t see how that can be refuted. He went from being the most celebrated athlete in the most cosmopolitan and international city in the world, to a non-entity who squandered the rest of his career in obscurity. Whatever he made extra from the Rockets, he would have easily recouped in NY in endorsements and appearance fees. And Morey made a colossal blunder in trying to erase the mistake of letting him go in the first place…nobody else would have offered Lin that contract, and he never got his money’s worth.

    Everyone got screwed, especially Knicks fans, but I blame Morey and Lin way more than Dolan on that one.

  194. Brian Cronin: And all for Dolan’s ego (as the theoretical monster luxury tax hit never even happened due to the Knicks trading away players – as if the theoretical monster luxury tax bill was ever anything but a ex post facto explanation, which it wasn’t).

    Again, we can second guess all we want, but had they matched, there’s no telling what deals would have been made or were even possible. At the time, the tax implications were clearly the reason for not matching, I don’t understand how you can call it a “theoretical monster” when it was very real. Maybe I am misremembering, but I don’t recall anyone discussing creative ways the Knicks could have avoided that tax hit during the matchng window. My recollection is that they subsequently were able to make some deals because they weren’t hard-capped by signing Lin. I vaguely remember folks saying that signing Lin would have prevented the Bargnani deal, is that not correct?

  195. Lin got screwed by circumstance more than by Morey. Remember he was signed by a Hardenless Rocket team. He might have done fine there, but the opportunity to get Harden came and Morey took it, making Lin a sixth wheel on that team.

  196. Z! The annual proof of life, love it.

    I loved every second of Linsanity. It clearly couldn’t last though. His go for broke style was never going to be a recipe for longevity.

    I do wonder what he would do if he could do it all over again. He will probably end up making around 100 million all in, so you can’t say he made the wrong choice. But he probably hasn’t had the career of his dreams either.

  197. “Seems like we’re a decent PG away from revisiting those times…a young team with heart, cohesion and potential.”

    No question average or above average PG play would help a lot but just as big an issue is the starting 2 shot 32%, the starting PF shot 29% and the (should be) starting 5 shoots 0% from 3. The back ups aren’t much better.

    The way IGGY progressed the last part of the seson at Westchester I really want to see him get some floor time. We also desperately need RJ to get his godfather to break down his shot and rebuild it from scratch because his motion is seriously flawed and only a few players like Jamal Wilkes can shoot consistently with an unorthodox motion.

    You’d need Chris Paul’s and John Stockton’s love child to overcome that dearth of shooting….

  198. I think Dolan should’ve kept Lin solely for the box office and merchandising. That would’ve made up for the tax hit.

    Linsanity started while Melo was injured, if I remember correctly, and Melo never seemed to be on board with It. Oh well. Morey’s an asshole, but no one forced all the terrible subsequent moves on the Knicks. No one to blame but the front office.

  199. am actually fine with keeping Perry as GM

    if you look at the mechanics under Perry’s GM tenure, it’s all been fine. The contracts have been reasonable and even team-friendly, the trades have been reasonable value. The problem has been the underlying strategy. And it sure seems like Brock Aller and Leon Rose will be doing the strategy part, and will leave the mechanics to Perry, which he is well-suited to.

  200. With each passing day I become more convinced that Leon Rose is going to be a continuation of the dumber than a pile of rocks management we’ve had in place for most of the last few decades.

    Building a good team is about understanding how to play winning basketball, evaluating talent, developing talent, fitting pieces to together well, and then paying those players fair to bargain salaries with a sensible contract duration. We are accumulating and keeping a bunch of basketball imbeciles. They don’t understand how to play wining basketball, don’t evaluate talent well because they stress athleticism and shot creation over defense and team oriented play with a lot of player and ball movement, and have no clue whatsoever how to fit the pieces together.

    Even with all his bad GM level decisions (with help from a wildly incompetent GM in Mills), I’d take Phil/Gaines over these idiots every day of the week. We need a Phil level basketball mind with a very good GM. We don’t need basketball imbeciles with a barely competent GM.

  201. Lin was a good player that was ideally suited to play for D’Antoni, but it’s obvious he was nothing more than a good backup or stop gap in any other situation. He ultimately declined due to repeated injuries. He would have been more than adequate under MDA as long as Melo/Amare wren’t part of team together. Melo and Amare were always a horrible fit because they were both bad on defense and overlapped in some ways on offense. That combo also ruined what Lin did best which was run the P&R and drive and kick. You need space, 3 point shooters, and a good finisher to optimize that. It would have worked with Amare but not with Melo and definitely now with both Amare and Melo.

  202. It’s amazing how much joy we got out of every win in that era…how much hope that ill-constructed, ill-managed team gave us.

    It was an incredible illusion. The construction of the franchise from top to bottom was a disaster waiting to happen…capped out on 2 incompatible and deeply flawed max players, defensive guys playing for a vindictive offensive system-driven coach who conjured flashes in the pan left and right, and a moronically dysfunctional front office. It was certain to crumble into dust.

    If nothing else, the total uncertainty about this team is refreshing. Having cap room, lots of young players, tons of draft picks…I miss the fleeting glory of Linsanity and even the false hope of Melo and Amare, but at least what we see right now seems real, sustainable, and fixable.

  203. Even with all his bad GM level decisions (with help from a wildly incompetent GM in Mills), I’d take Phil/Gaines over these idiots every day of the week.

    Well, we KNOW Phil stunk at being POBO. I’m kind of with you that Rose will PROBABLY be bad. But we KNOW for sure that Phil was bad.

    Rose has a 5% chance of being good. Phil was definitely, certainly not good. I’ll take 5% over 0%.

  204. I hope you are wrong, Strat. It’s very hard to evaluate Rose so far given the stasis the league is in at the moment along with the short time he has been at the helm. He’s really only done one thing, which is hiring Aller, and that is a very meh move. Aller is associated with a Cleveland team that did a good job of fitting pieces around LeBron, but also with the Cleveland team that gave an awful contract to Love. The other two things he might be doing (but that are not totally resolved) are Keeping Perry around to negotiate trades and contracts, and keeping Miller around or maybe replacing him with Thibs. Neither of those things is awful and both are better than many Knick GM decisions of the past. So I am not sure where you are getting your “dumber than a pile of rocks” vibe from.

  205. Steve Mills as Phil Jackson’s scapegoat is still my favorite Strat fantasy land construction. It’s just the best.

    “We need pinch post passing, go get me Joakim Noah”
    “Uh, Phil, he’s asking for 4/72, should we give him that”
    “Listen, I don’t know what numbers are, I only know basketball things”
    “Okay, I’ll give him 4/72 then”
    “Okay now I need Lance Thomas”
    “He wants four years, should we give him that”
    “Listen, four is a number and I don’t know numbers”

  206. If MSG can stream old footage of 90s Knicks basketball during the pandemic, then we should have every right here at KB to relitigate old and dead conversations like: Is Phil a good GM? Does Frank N. have a heartbeat? 5 Chandlers v 5 Melos?

  207. Again, we can second guess all we want, but had they matched, there’s no telling what deals would have been made or were even possible. At the time, the tax implications were clearly the reason for not matching, I don’t understand how you can call it a “theoretical monster” when it was very real. Maybe I am misremembering, but I don’t recall anyone discussing creative ways the Knicks could have avoided that tax hit during the matchng window. My recollection is that they subsequently were able to make some deals because they weren’t hard-capped by signing Lin. I vaguely remember folks saying that signing Lin would have prevented the Bargnani deal, is that not correct?

    We did discuss creative ways they could have avoided the tax hit, because they were many (like trading any number of players, which is precisely what happened, or even waiving guys if need be to stretch their salaries out, plus, of course, the general “the cap will probably be going up and thus the luxury cap hit will be lessened,” which was also what happened). Not signing a guy who could help your capped out, win now team in 2012 because of a theoretical cap bill in 2015 is not a good idea. And, again, I don’t believe it was the concern. It was that Dolan felt disrespected by the reworked deal. I mean, come on, Glen Grunwald literally trying to hide from the Rockets so that he could delay the start of the offer period sure doesn’t sound like the actions of a guy who thinks that the new deal was an automatic “no,” right?

    The only limitations for the Bargs deal, vis a vis Lin, would have been the fact that they would have added even more salary in the Bargs deal. In fact, the fact that they added a bunch of salary in the Bargs’ deal was a good indication that the luxury tax complications wasn’t the deciding factor for the Knicks, since Dolan had no problem adding salaries a year later (and, of course, the fact that Dolan had previously spent $45 million in luxury tax on a 33 win team and $37 million in luxury tax on a 23 win team).

  208. Brian Cronin: We did discuss creative ways they could have avoided the tax hit, because they were many (like trading any number of players, which is precisely what happened, or even waiving guys if need be to stretch their salaries out, plus, of course, the general “the cap will probably be going up and thus the luxury cap hit will be lessened,” which was also what happened). Not signing a guy who could help your capped out, win now team in 2012 because of a theoretical cap bill in 2015 is not a good idea. And, again, I don’t believe it was the concern. It was that Dolan felt disrespected by the reworked deal. I mean, come on, Glen Grunwald literally trying to hide from the Rockets so that he could delay the start of the offer period sure doesn’t sound like the actions of a guy who thinks that the new deal was an automatic “no,” right?

    The only limitations for the Bargs deal, vis a vis Lin, would have been the fact that they would have added even more salary in the Bargs deal. In fact, the fact that they added a bunch of salary in the Bargs’ deal was a good indication that the luxury tax complications wasn’t the deciding factor for the Knicks, since Dolan had no problem adding salaries a year later (and, of course, the fact that Dolan had previously spent $45 million in luxury tax on a 33 win team and $37 million in luxury tax on a 23 win team).

    Brian, well said. For once, we were on the peak of the win curve, and the optimal strategy was right in our wheelhouse – overpay a free agent. We even messed that up. That’s some serious Dolan Razor.

  209. Linsanity started while Melo was injured, if I remember correctly, and Melo never seemed to be on board with It.

    He was definitely not on board with it. The Lin contract was one of the only times I can remember a player talking shit about another player’s contract when Melo called the Rockets’ offer ‘ridiculous’.

    But at least eventualy Melo got a ‘ridiculous’ contract of his own when Phil gave him the mega max. Kinda ironic.

  210. He was definitely not on board with it. The Lin contract was one of the only times I can remember a player talking shit about another player’s contract when Melo called the Rockets’ offer ‘ridiculous’.

    But at least eventualy Melo got a ‘ridiculous’ contract of his own when Phil gave him the mega max. Karma, I guess?

    JR was also talking shit about it because he was worried it would impact his salary the next season.

  211. We have bad basketball people in charge now. Phil is a genius basketball mind that needed a high level GM to guide him through the “fair salary”, “fair contract length”, “fair trade” issues, but he was 100% on the right path to drafting the right kinds of players and playing the right style of basketball to build a winning team that would eventually compete for championships. We’d already be very good if he had proper guidance in the areas he was weak, but right now we suck so badly because the Mills/Perry combo set us back years further. Other than maybe Miller (who may be out) I pretty much hate everyone in this organization.

    It took me decades to really start understanding basketball well. Trust me on this, if anything good comes of this (and it will eventually when you are constantly in the lottery) it will be years later than it should have been and dumb ass luck by idiots.

  212. JR was also talking shit about it because he was worried it would impact his salary the next season.

    Forgot about that. Makes me think that CAA (+ Knicks) may have had a hand in coordinating the comments. You just never see stuff like that anywhere else. It’s dumb + convoluted enough to feel Knicksy.

  213. All in all, we can go on and on about Lin. The truth is, he just wasn’t that good and probably would not have made much of a difference going forward. I doubt that he would have held up, or played well enough to advance us into the ECG, and the chemistry issues were real. But I would have preferred that Dolan matched.

    It’s just that in the long line of grievances I have re: Dolan, not matching that contract is very low on the list. I said so at the time and I still feel that way. Lin went on to have a very mediocre career, so whatever.

  214. JR also said:

    I don’t really know how Mr. Dolan [owner James Dolan] feels at this point with what the luxury tax is now and what it used to be, but I just hope it works out the best for both of them.

    That quote is weird as hell. What player openly worries about the owner’s luxury tax payments? That was fed to him by his CAA agent.

  215. If you want a rosy take (npi) keeping Perry on for a year might suggest that they will go all-in on Masai.

  216. Strat, you have higher aspirations for a GM than I do. I’m just hoping for mediocrity. That would be so much better than before. There actually aren’t that many GMs in the league who know how to do the sort of team construction you want them to know. I would say Ujiri, Riley, the Clippers with Jerry West as an advisor, whoever runs the Bucks, maybe David Griffin, and possibly Steve Kerr (who used to be a GM). Can you suggest anyone else?

  217. If you want a rosy take (npi) keeping Perry on for a year might suggest that they will go all-in on Masai.

    Shit, I was seriously just about to edit the piece to say, “And who knows who might be available in a year?” Yeah, that’s a great point. It probably won’t pan out (because Knicks), but it’s a great point, nonetheless.

  218. Dolan needs a new mole w/o Mills. This is Perry’s audition.

    Ha! I like the idea of Berman just writing a bunch of articles about how great Perry is.

  219. I should add that I think the Perry/Mills combo had no clue how to match players for good results. I just don’t think there is enough information to know how good Rose is at this.

  220. All in all, we can go on and on about Lin. The truth is, he just wasn’t that good and probably would not have made much of a difference going forward. I doubt that he would have held up, or played well enough to advance us into the ECG, and the chemistry issues were real. But I would have preferred that Dolan matched.

    It’s just that in the long line of grievances I have re: Dolan, not matching that contract is very low on the list. I said so at the time and I still feel that way. Lin went on to have a very mediocre career, so whatever.

    That’s good to hear that you would have preferred that they matched.

    And hey, while I think it was a terrible move, I am more than fine with not bringing it up (as I do think we’ve made our positions crystal clear by now)! I haven’t brought it up in years!

  221. All in all, we can go on and on about Lin. The truth is, he just wasn’t that good and probably would not have made much of a difference going forward. I doubt that he would have held up, or played well enough to advance us into the ECG, and the chemistry issues were real. But I would have preferred that Dolan matched.

    It’s just that in the long line of grievances I have re: Dolan, not matching that contract is very low on the list. I said so at the time and I still feel that way. Lin went on to have a very mediocre career, so whatever.

    That’s good to hear that you would have preferred that they matched.

    And hey, while I think it was a terrible move, I am more than fine with not bringing it up (as I do think we’ve made our positions crystal clear by now)! I haven’t brought it up in years (and I didn’t bring it up this time, either)!

  222. Brian Cronin: That’s good to hear that you would have preferred that they matched.

    I’ve said that all along. I never advocated for not matching. Don’t put words in my mouth, please.

  223. Brian Cronin: And hey, while I think it was a terrible move, I am more than fine with not bringing it up (as I do think we’ve made our positions crystal clear by now)! I haven’t brought it up in years (and I didn’t bring it up this time, either)!

    Neither did I. Z brought it up, and Jowles poked the bear.

  224. I’ve said that all along. I never advocated for not matching. Don’t put words in my mouth, please.

    I certainly didn’t mean it as such. I honestly didn’t recall you saying that before. My apologies for any “word putting” implication.

  225. Neither did I. Z brought it up, and Jowles poked the bear.

    Oh yeah, I get that. Just noting it from my end that I’m more than fine with never arguing about the Jeremy Lin offer sheet ever again. :)

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