Report: Allan Houston to be next Knicks GM?

Jared Zwerling, one of Bleacher Report’s newest NBA writers, reported yesterday that the Knicks’ shocking decision to relieve Glenn Grunwald of his role earlier this week is, potentially, good news for former Knick and current assistant general manager Allan Houston.

According to Zwerling and his sources, the Knicks are likely grooming Houston to eventually take over for new GM Steve Mills in a couple of years.

This wouldn’t be a tremendous shock, considering Houston is the current Assistant GM, though that doesn’t make the abrupt Grunwald firing any less bizarre.

One of the sources Zwerling cites in the piece had this to say about Houston’s relationship with Knicks owner James Dolan.

“Dolan has always taken care of his former players, especially stars, which Allan was. I guarantee you he’s close to Allan just like Isiah Thomas and other former Knicks,”- Source #2.

We’ll probably never find out the real motivation behind the abrupt Grunwald dismissal by Dolan, but this might be the closest answer we get. Dolan is an odd guy, but he’s a guy who knows what he wants, and won’t hesitate to drastically change the course of the franchise to get it. If Zwerling’s source is accurate, and Houston’s relationship with Dolan is starting to mirror the one Isiah had(s), all the chaos this week will at least have some sort of rhyme or reason to it. On the surface, at least.

Houston has worked his way up the ladder under two very different GM’s with two very different philosophies in Grunwald and Donnie Walsh. He’s regarded highly by numerous players and executives, so perhaps Dolan zoning in on Houston being his guy to guide the franchise going forward won’t meet the same fate as the Isiah years.

Additionally, it might well be the case that Dolan — who nearly whiffed completely on the 2010 free agent class — wants to give Houston the position as the Knicks once again try and lure new stars to the Big Apple in 2015.

Lots of questions still remain, obviously, but the dust is certainly starting to settle. Maybe everything will be okay. Oh wait, it’s the Knicks, which means: PROCEED WITH CAUTION.

Jeremy Lin, By The Books

Jeremy Lin is your textbook point guard. He focuses on penetrating into the lane, keeping his dribble until an option presents itself, and making the safe pass to the open man. He appears poised at times, but that doesn’t prevent him from playing an energetic brand of basketball. Lin is averaging 1.7 stl/36 and is able to run the fast break.

The Knicks, lately devoid of Melo and STAT, are on a three-game win streak since D’Antoni inserted Lin into the lineup during the Nets game. Perhaps it’s because Lin fits the Knicks better than the other point guards on the roster. Douglas and Bibby frequently pick up their dribble and prefer to stay outside the arc instead of “wetting” their feet in the paint.

Like Steve Nash or Jason Kidd, Lin weaves in and out of the paint, continuing his dribble even through crowds of defenders. Once he’s near the basket, he has an innate ability to assess the defense. If it’s one-on-one, he can finish at the rim and has the knack for drawing the and-1 foul, as seen here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5vKayhN2Ug. If he is double-teamed, he either kicks it out to a shooter, or finds a big man rolling to the hoop, like this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B3MRqMwh54.

In the last three games, Jeremy is shooting 59% from the field, 80% from the line, and averaging 25 points, 8 assists, and 4 rebounds in 39 minutes per game. His shot still needs work, but the form looks good. Most of his jumpers so far have fallen short, which would indicate his legs aren’t in “basketball shape.” Thus far Lin has faced some of the league’s weaker teams. As the season progresses opponents will prepare better for him by crowding the middle, taking away his right hand, and forcing him to take more jump shots. The Lakers on Friday will be his toughest challenge to date.

Jeremy Lin is a Harvard grad who went undrafted in 2010. His game may be elementary, but Lin seems to be excelling where other players from big name schools have failed.