Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Content Tagged "Yao Ming"

Daily Knicks Picks: Media Round-up 7/27/10

Scott Cacciola of the Wall Street Journal on Anthony Randolph: Long, Lean, Unlimited. “How about his two violent dunks over the Houston Rockets’ Yao Ming during his rookie season? Or his epic two-handed block on a breakaway by Los Angeles Lakers superstar Kobe Bryant? These are the sorts of plays—flashes of brilliance, really—where Mr. Randolph unfolds his 6-foot-11 frame and hints at what he might be, could be, should be.” And Randolph says there will be no more excuses, writes Tim Bontemps of the NY Post. “‘It’s all on me right now,’ Randolph said yesterday at the Knicks’ Summer Basketball …continue reading

Knicks Offseason Decisions Begin

With free agency commencing, the Knicks will have to make a major decision regarding their two restricted free agents, David Lee and Nate Robinson. New York has 8 players on their roster that could play the PF or C position: Curry, Milicic, Hill, Wilcox, Hunter, Sene, Gallinari, Jeffries, and Harrington. So on one hand the Knicks have the depth to let David Lee go. However at a second glance, it’s clear that the team would be hard pressed to replace Lee’s production. Although Hill and Gallinari might develop into NBA starters, none of the above are starting material on a …continue reading

Free Agent Roundup — Day 1

Baron Davis has reportedly agreed to a 5-year, $65 million deal with the Clippers. No offers or signings are official before July 9th, when the the league announces the final salary cap figures. Apparently it takes eight days for a team of chipmunks to work the slide rules over on Park Avenue. Assuming a cap number in the realm of $58,130,000 – what I saw on real GM – just four teams have significant cap room.  WIthout Davis, Golden State has the most — about $24 million. However, they also need to save up to re-sign Monta Ellis and Andris Biedrins. …continue reading

Who Will Win the West?

Unlike the East, picking the winner of the West is a daunting task. There is much less variance between the top 7 teams in the West than the East. If given a thousand chances, I can see…

What You Can Learn At the Game

At about 4:30 Wednesday two tickets to the Knicks game fell on my lap. Unfortunately due to personal circumstances it wasn’t a good day for me to go. So I tried to unload the tickets. I sent an email to a few writers on my site, but no one was able to go. I sent a second email to a few commenters, again with no luck. I tried to call up a few friends, but to no avail. In essence I couldn’t give the tickets away. Oh how the mighty have fallen. So I had two options: let the tickets …continue reading

2008 Season Preview: The Backcourt & Swingmen

The Backcourt Statistically Stephon Marbury still remains above average offensively, but he’s not nearly as productive as he used to be. The Knicks PG still is effective with his incursions to the basket, and at the latter stages of his career he’s become a better shooter. However to the eye Marbury doesn’t appear to be comfortable in Isiah’s offense. Gone are his pick & roll plays and his domination of the ball. Marbury has problems making entry passes to the low post, which is a problem considering that’s where the Knicks will look to score. On the other hand Jamal …continue reading

Trading David Lee for Kobe Bryant Straight-Up: Shrewd Sabermetrics or Laugh Test Flunkie?

In Basketball on Paper, Dean Oliver devoted an entire chapter to comparing the individual rating systems of several NBA analysts. He argued something that I, and most people who do informed analysis, subscribe to: Any system of statistical analysis cannot only be internally consistent, but must also pass the “laugh test.” A statistical model can be built elegantly and beautifully and pass many confidence intervals within its own logical parameters, but if it’s results are absurd, then there’s obviously a need to return to the proverbial drawing board. Oliver thought of the “laugh test” as a litmus. It’s a very …continue reading