Knicks Morning News (2021.09.09)

  • Opinion: Former First Round Pick By The New York Knicks Should Sign With This Team – Sports Illustrated
    [www.si.com] — Wednesday, September 8, 2021 6:52:24 PM

    Opinion: Former First Round Pick By The New York Knicks Should Sign With This Team  Sports Illustrated

  • Ex-Net, Knick player will compete on next ‘DWTS’ – Newsday
    [www.newsday.com] — Wednesday, September 8, 2021 6:36:32 PM

    Ex-Net, Knick player will compete on next ‘DWTS’  Newsday

  • Louder Than A Bomb: James Dolan’s silence around the Knicks is familiar, frightening & almost human – Posting and Toasting
    [www.postingandtoasting.com] — Wednesday, September 8, 2021 2:26:21 PM

    Louder Than A Bomb: James Dolan’s silence around the Knicks is familiar, frightening & almost human  Posting and Toasting

  • RJ Barrett Looks Ready For Season in Offseason Pro Run – Heavy.com
    [heavy.com] — Wednesday, September 8, 2021 11:28:52 AM

    RJ Barrett Looks Ready For Season in Offseason Pro Run  Heavy.com

  • NY Knicks: 3 Players Who Will Benefit from the Return of Derrick Rose – Daily Knicks
    [dailyknicks.com] — Wednesday, September 8, 2021 11:19:00 AM

    NY Knicks: 3 Players Who Will Benefit from the Return of Derrick Rose  Daily Knicks

  • How different is the Knicks’ point guard unit compared to last year? – Empire Sports Media
    [empiresportsmedia.com] — Wednesday, September 8, 2021 10:31:58 AM

    How different is the Knicks’ point guard unit compared to last year?  Empire Sports Media

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    52 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2021.09.09)”

    1. My problem with tennis is that it has seemed to be a progression of one GOAT after another, with long stretches of dynastic predictability.

      I don’t believe what’s going on in tennis now is all superior sports science and nutrition extending the careers of great players. I suspect a lot of these guys are juiced. Unfortunately it’s impossible to prove.

      Back when I was young, tennis players used to peak in their early to mid 20s (women even younger) and most started fading a little by their late 20s. By 30 they were either retired or had dropped enough in the rankings they weren’t considered in the top few. Sampras and Connors were considered super human for still being able to win a Grand Slam at 31 even though they had slipped.

      I’ll buy that athletes are taking better care of themselves nutritionally and working out a little smarter. That allows them to keep their peak a little longer. But I’m not buying that guys with prior surgeries or multiple physical problems that required long layoffs can keep coming back and reaching the same or even higher peaks well into their 30s.

      It’s an open secret in horse racing that there are juicers throughout the industry using designer PEDs that cannot be detected no matter how much they test. The industry is also full of apologists saying these guys just work smarter and harder. But it’s all BS. They just busted a few very high profile trainers by using wiretaps. They never would have been able to bust them with testing because what they were using was undetectable or at worst would have come back as a picogram positive for a legal therapeutic. There has to be human versions of the same types of drugs that are giving human athletes more stamina, better recoveries, and extending their peak careers. We just don’t know about it yet. Maybe we never will.

    2. Deeefense: Back when I was young, tennis players used to peak in their early to mid 20s (women even younger) and most started fading a little by their late 20s.

      Strat, you may be right about juicing but there is a more logical explanation if you have watched the game evolve over the last 30 years. And that is the racket technology has all but eliminated the serve and volley player. A serve and volley player who loses a half step will plummet down the rankings whereby a hard hitting baseliner who loses half a step can make this up by improving other facets of his (or her) game. Everyone loses a half step once they hit 30. Pete Sampras mentioned this when he discussed his retirement while his rival Agassi was still thriving (though if I had to bet on any player being juiced I would pick Agassi, mostly because of the era he played in).

      Though not as pronounced, I think basketball is going through the same thing–the modern offence is phasing out the traditional center with 3 point shooting becoming the key skill. There will be more GOATs and GOAT debates as it is not clear exactly how good a 3 point shooter could emerge if all of the next generation have been trained to drain 3’s from the day each first touched a basketball.

    3. It’s gonna be a real long time before somebody challenges Serena Williams’ GOAT status in the women’s game. She’s the best woman tennis player ever by orders of magnitude.

    4. Just to let all the Frankophiles know that the first article on the list “Opinion: Former First Round Pick By The New York Knicks Should Sign With This Team – Sports Illustrated” is about the former first round pick you love and defend. ;P

    5. From the last thread,

      geo: hmmmm, so does that mean you believe there is some kind of personal scorecard folks move through life with, and that at some point it will be evaluated by something/someone?

      No Geo, i’m not a religious person, if that was the question. But i also don’t strongly disagree with people that believe.
      Maybe it’s Morpheus, that comes to save us from the Matrix, if we behave well. LOL

    6. I agree that the game and equipment has changed, but so has the ability to come back from injury, surgery, and overcome age. That’s different.

      That’s EXACTLY that happens with juiced horses. When they are in the hands of a “clean” trainer, they slowly peak, but eventually age, injuries, or both catch up and they can be objectively measured to be declining. Those very same horses will have sudden turnarounds and get back to peak form or even higher if the trainer changes to a suspected “juice” trainer.

      Guys now have significant injuries or surgery in their 30s and come back as good as new or even better. That’s not normal. Everyone knows it at the track because you can objectively measure performance to a decent degree and you can see the before and after performances when they switch trainers. We don’t have that ability in tennis and other sports. They don’t go on and off drugs with different trainers.

      I wasn’t born yesterday. These guys are using something. It may not be steroids, but something is allowing them to recover and last longer even after injury, surgery, age, and general wear and tear should be causing a decline.

    7. It’s been rumored about Djokovic forever. I don’t know. A lot of his greatness is his ability to return the ball, his balance, his flexibility. Can’t juice those.

      And both Federer and Nadal have had pretty standard decline curves.

      Athletes in every sport seem to be performing at an elite level longer. It’s certainly true in basketball. So I don’t know what to make of that accusation. But it’s a thing you can say I guess.

    8. I think strat’s right on this one. Watching one tennis player after another (Federer, Nadal, Djokovic) achieve things at ages no one else has ever been able to do is like watching McGwire & Sosa hit 70 & 66 home runs, or Lance Armstrong set all time records. I think you really have to have your head in the sand to think this is all about a gluten free diet (which is what the djokovic camp credits for his endurance… kinda like how McGwire left that bottle of Andro out there to distract from his obviously unnatural muscle growth).

      I’d put my money on Serena being doped, too.

    9. Can’t disagree Hubert. Loving the sport, I cling to the hope that the drug-haters, like Andy Murray, are right. But then again I loved track and field, particularly Carl Lewis.

      So unfortunately, like being a Knicks fan, you tend to have your head close to or immersed deeply in the sand. I am team optimist for the Knicks and sceptical of tennis doping. Hopefully I bat .500, with Djokovic failing a drug test.

    10. It’s not tennis, but wanted to highlight something from one of the articles above. Our point guards at the start of last year:

      -Elfrid Payton
      -Frank Ntilikina
      -Dennis Smith Jr.
      -Jared Harper

      And going into this season:

      -Kemba Walker
      -Derrick Rose
      -Miles McBride
      -Immanuel Quickley

      Makes me want to roll around in those names like a cat in a bed of catnip. What a difference.

    11. After reading an article “I doped like Sharapova, and it was great” a few years ago I have been taking it regularly. Mildronate, available on Amazon.

    12. After reading an article “I doped like Sharapova, and it was great” a few years ago I have been taking it regularly. Mildronate, available on Amazon.

      as i age, i am becoming increasing more of a believer in the power of chemistry…oh man, in lieu of proper diet and actual exercise i’ve become a bit of a rapid supplements fan lately…

      i wonder if Mildronate comes in a tasty gummy :)

    13. No Geo, i’m not a religious person, if that was the question. But i also don’t strongly disagree with people that believe.
      Maybe it’s Morpheus, that comes to save us from the Matrix, if we behave well. LOL

      more just my own internal questioning of my beliefs, sorry to drag you in to it…i’m all signed up for the whole jesus is my lord and savior thing – however, when you start digging in to some of the details of the “story” there’s a bit of serious suspension of critical thought required, same goes for many popular religions…my faith and my “rational” mind don’t always sync up so well…

      one of the more interesting faith things i remember encountering was when i was stationed over in germany…went to visit with a staff sergeant rangel’s (i think that’s how he spelt it) and his family at their home…he was a neat guy, different…he was our communications security person, very fastidious in his work…when you work in the military there is often lots of time to sit around, talk with the folks and get to know them fairly well…

      anyways, i remember inside his home he had his whole dining room set up with biblical genealogy written on all these poster sheets, who begat who and whatnot…it caught me a bit off guard in the moment, but really left an impression…ssgt rangel was seriously committed to his beliefs…there didn’t appear to be much doubt in him…

    14. If people (and equines too, I guess) are able to overcome injury and prolong their careers, isn’t that a good thing? Don’t we want to watch great players play for longer? That’s not like taking pcp to run through brick walls, or quarking bats to break interstellar home-run records, or deflating footballs to do whatever it is that deflating footballs does. Cheating is bad, but medical science, often under the guidance of an actual doctor, should be seen as something else, no?

      I am often confused by the moral relativism that surrounds the sanctity and “purity” of sports. Aging sucks, and the history of man reads as a history or self-indulgent men trying to obtain immortality. Pro-athletes are the worst kind of casualty because they are paid obscene amounts of money to be super-human, then are publicly humiliated when their productivity wanes and their mortality becomes real. It’s plantation mentality, and words like purity only underscore the ugliness of it.

      Oh, and don’t get me started on gear. I have recently begun competing in triathlons, but I have a hard time taking seriously any sport where rich people can buy a faster time simply by throwing money at carbon fiber and elliptical cranks. Also, wetsuits. Who needs a wetsuit to swim in 70 degree water? Only two kinds of people: wimps, and tri-guys looking to swim 20% faster.

      Thank you for listening.

      -DW

    15. Started going to the Open in the early 90s, been a bunch of times since. Think my first one was ’93 and Strat’s right — even 30 was “old” then. (It’s easy to look up the age of the high seeds and high ranked players, and I’m sure it will confirm).

      /ok I’m bored and under the weather:

      1. Jim Courier — just turned 23
      2. Pete Sampras — just turned 22
      3. Stefan Edberg — 27
      4. Boris Becker — 25
      5. Sergi Bruguera — 22
      6. Michael Stich — 24
      7. Michael Chang — 21
      8. Andrei Medvedev — turned 19 the day the tourney started
      9. Petr Korda — 25 (nice genes!!)
      10. Richard Krajicek — 21
      11. Goran Ivanicevic — turned 22 in week 2
      12. Thomas Muster — 25 (probably the top fitness guy of that era)
      13. Ivan Lendl — 33 (the Djokovic/Nadal/Federer of around 83-89-ish; way past his prime by ’93. Lendl basically single-handedly proves the point.)
      14. Alexander Volkov — 26
      15. Cedric Piolene — 24
      16. Andre Agassi — 23

      So, yeah, the top guys are definitely doing something substance-wise, primarily to help in recovery.(*) It’s not as though Pete Sampras and Stefan Edberg sat around eating brisket sandwiches between matches; guys from 1993 knew full well about diet and all the rest. Tiger Woods likely was too, as well as some other golfers. Is what it is.

      (*) Recovery is what winds up making you lose it once you get past about 30. If the tournament was one or two matches, sure, 37 year olds could have competed then. Jimmy Connors had his run in 1991 at 38-39 and completely ran out of gas in the semis.

    16. The gear in both tennis and golf is light years better than it was in the early 90s. The tennis racquet I bought in 2019 is like a nuclear bomb compared to the ones from 1991. The 2019 racquet is way better than the same model (Babolat) I had from like 2013. The golf equipment improvement is even more pronounced.

    17. The issue with steroids is it has severe adverse health effects that approved medications do not, including several studies that show a higher rate of death among juicers.

      It wouldn’t surprise me if modern steroids on a well regulated regimen can mitigate most of this difference. For a professional athlete, taking steroids is almost a no-brainer, exchanging minimal long-term health consequences for drastically increased lifetime income makes all the sense in the world.

    18. The issue with steroids is it has severe adverse health effects that approved medications do not

      ugh, as someone who’s pill box is way too full, with approved medications, pretty much all medication has some adverse side effect…

      For a professional athlete, taking steroids is almost a no-brainer, exchanging minimal long-term health consequences for drastically increased lifetime income makes all the sense in the world.

      and, there it is – possibility of financial reward, positive recognition, plus the fact that those are very competitive individuals…

    19. James Blake had an interesting riff last night about how he thinks the advancement in strings has actually been more important than anything to happen in rackets in a long while. I didn’t actually catch why, other than superior control, but he said it’s a huge factor.

      I guess I don’t get the argument here. Federer won one major between the ages of 30 and 35 and then got healthy and won three in two years at the age of 36 and 37. Was that because he was doping? Rafa has been hurt so much too he barely plays these days.

      It’s also worth their while to play in a way I don’t think it was for players back in the day.

      I think Djokovic just has superhuman resilience but anything is possible.

    20. Owen: I guess I don’t get the argument here. Federer won one major between the ages of 30 and 35 and then got healthy and won three in two years at the age of 36 and 37.

      That’s the argument right there. It’s not normal for world-class athletes to break down between 30 and 35 (*) and then “get healthy” and get way better at 36-37. That’s not how the male body works, especially at those levels. It just isn’t.

      I browsed a bit more at the 1993 Open; according to the Times story, Wally Masur kind of lucked his way through the round of 16 to the quarters and at that point, he was the oldest player left in the bracket. He was 30.

      There’s no moral or ethical component to these comments whatsoever, purely empiricism.

      (*) Well, the breaking down at 30 part is normal ….

    21. The Mildronate that WADA baned makes recovery more efficient. It encourages the cells to burn sugar preferentially. as a consequence carb loading is more effective. In tennis you can have a sports drink every five minute. Basically water sugar and salt. As we age we lose ability to handle the sugar.
      https://dai.ly/x3yr8bp

    22. Well, it seems an odd choice to start doping at 35. Not buying the narrative. It just doesn’t make sense.

    23. hey brador, so, are you just getting old and looking to do whatever to keep things going, or, are you competitive in some activity which supplements assist?

      i was gonna ask if it works, obviously if you’ve been doing it a while your like the results…

    24. James Blake had an interesting riff last night about how he thinks the advancement in strings has actually been more important than anything to happen in rackets in a long while. I didn’t actually catch why, other than superior control, but he said it’s a huge factor.

      It happened a long time ago, and is absolutely true. Polyester strings are so very different from anything else, save maybe kevlar, which is almost totally unused at this point.

      Natural gut was and still is the “premium” string (~$50 a set); it’s made of actual cow intestine (used to be sheep) and has incredible power, feel and comfort. One of my rackets is strung with Wilson natural gut that I found on sale online, like the kind Federer used throughout his career, to the best of my knowledge. It is truly a premium experience. My serve flies off the racket and I don’t deal with any wrist issues, as I often do with polyester (more on that later).

      Problem is that, in addition to the price tag, natural gut breaks very quickly, and is slippery in a way that does not grip the ball for topspin. Multifilament strings are closest to gut in feel and power, and have also gone the way of the buffalo. I believe there are just a couple kinds of multifilament strings used on the tour (Tecnifibre NRG2 and X-Biphase).

      Then there’s synthetic gut, which is what you find on pre-strung rackets at the big box stores. No one uses these as they are cheap-feeling, plasticky in a way that is truly unpleasant once you’ve tried something else.

      Polyester took over the tour after a guy won the French Open with blistering topspin shots back in 1999 or so. Very quickly everyone caught on, and polyester strings have received virtually all of the attention. The selection and price is simply outstanding, and they last several times longer than gut or multis do.

    25. (cont.) The advantage of polyester is noticeable as soon as you take a big hack with a racket strung with them. The strings are usually textured and “snap back” into place immediately after making contact, which means more RPMs, which, just like a Gerrit Cole-doctored fastball, means greater movement. This matters in the baseline-dominant game because you want to be able to swing as hard as you can to impart more topspin (resulting in the ball almost appearing to speed up when it hits the ground) and to get as deep as you can on the court, as it’s much harder to defend the court when you have to play several feet beyond the baseline.

      The downside of polyester is that the vibrations from the ball striking the string bed are transferred straight into your arm. Where natural gut and multifilament are soft and absorb the contact while shooting the ball off the string bed, polyester feels like you’re hitting a concrete block with a metal stick. It does — not — feel — good.

      A lot of guys at my level (3.5-4.0) play with full beds of polyester because that’s what the pros do, and because they last a good 6-10 hours before losing their best qualities, and wouldn’t you know, those guys end up with terrible tennis elbow, or, like me, tennis wrist, when there are days (and weeks) in which I can’t do a push-up on the floor, or “wrestle” with Lady Jowles in the full guard without having my fist in a fully straightened position, like a knuckle push-up. Although I have learned to adapt, Lady Jowles hates it! And so do I.

      Over time, polyester string varieties have been developed to be “softer,” but the material has its limits. I typically play with a soft polyester in the main strings (for topspin and “grip and rip” play-style) and a multifilament (for power and comfort) in the crosses. If I were rich as hell, I’d probably do natural gut in the crosses, if not a full bed, but that’s Federer shit. I ain’t that rich.

    26. I’m not rich as shit, or even rich at all, but I went natural gut in one direction, polyester in the other in the Babolat Pure Aero (the yellow one FAA among others use) (*) and the thing’s a cannon. Took two shots to realize. James Blake is definitely onto something.

      (*) I’m neither a string nerd, nor an equipment nerd to any serious degree; Tennis Warehouse just kind of “proposed” the string idea and I decided to splurge a tad.

    27. Big tennis fan here (I play twice a week) and loving all the debates.

      In the case of Federer, his play-style and change in racket head size (he went from 90 to 95 in 2015 and it really helped his offensive game), allows him to be successful in his mid 30s. He never had a major injury till recently and is probably done at age 40 but he’s a complete player that doesn’t rely on one thing that once he’s done, he’s cooked (like fucking Berrentini against Djoker last night, ugh).

      Nadal and Djoker you really have to admire for still winning in their mid 30s because their games are mostly physical and defensive minded. I always say Djoker is the Floyd Mayweather of tennis haha.

      Are they doping? Hard to say definitively without proof but I will say tennis is such a mental sport. The big 3 are so far ahead of the rest of the generation of players they played with (if Del Potro and Murray could’ve stayed healthy…) that having that advantage stays with you, no matter what age.

    28. So here’s one study on steroid use that found users 3x more likely to die than the control group.

      Of course, that’s still only 7 out of 545 users and those users probably are predisposed to use drugs and undertake other risky behavior. On the other hand, the study only lasted 7 years from average ages of 26 to 33. I’ll willingly speculate that the mortality difference would only increase as the years went on. Age 33 is pretty young to die of heart attack regardless of what you’re doing, and heart attack is what should worry steroid users.

      I don’t know what baseline mortality is acceptable from drugs or sports supplements, which is a pretty important piece of information. Also I’m sure steroid dosage and the exact form of steroid have a significant impact.

      I’ll reiterate that I think newer high-tech steroids in controlled dosages are probably not as problematic as assumed. But the above study does hint towards some problematic trends in heart disease that likely come to fruition after 40.

    29. Geo, I played seniors tennis till I was about 51and 4.5 team till fifty.. Our little team of 4.5 lwas a bunch of ex college player and local teaching pros. And me and my forty five year old doubles partner. We managed to place fourth in nationals. I was proud of us. But I’m now 75 and had valve replacement, minor strokes and the usual age related stuff. Mildronate is great. In animal and plant studies it aids growth and development in young plants and animals. And exiends life to boot. Being developed probably late 70s in eastern Europe it didn’t get western branding research or patents. It was banned due to Wada finding it in the blood of thousands of athletes. Who, right or wrong felt it benefited them.

    30. I always say Djoker is the Floyd Mayweather of tennis haha.

      Good comparison. Djokovic doesn’t have an all-timer weapon like a Karlovic serve, an Agassi return or Wawrinka backhand, but he is elite at just about everything. That’s enough, as noted, to beat every player currently on the tour. The guy just wins points and with the exception of Zverev in Tokyo, no one has been able to touch him for the last couple years. It’s crazy.

      I’m not rich as shit, or even rich at all, but I went natural gut in one direction, polyester in the other in the Babolat Pure Aero (the yellow one FAA among others use) (*) and the thing’s a cannon. Took two shots to realize. James Blake is definitely onto something.

      (*) I’m neither a string nerd, nor an equipment nerd to any serious degree; Tennis Warehouse just kind of “proposed” the string idea and I decided to splurge a tad.

      I found a pack for $18 so I tried it out, and like when I dropped my first $50 on Barbaresco wine, I was annoyed by how stark the quality improvement was. Natural gut is simply amazing to play with, but the Pure Aero (I have one myself, rarely used) almost requires polyester to keep the ball in play. It’s funny that Pure Drive (oops, also got one) is their “power” racket, but I find the Pure Aero more powerful on flat shots.

      When you replace your strings, try multifilaments in the crosses if you want to save some money. You probably won’t notice a huge difference between gut and multis as a hybrid stringing, but a full bed of poly in the Pure Aero and the VCORE 98 made my bicep weep with pain. Don’t go that route unless you think you’re built like a tank.

    31. I don’t think that steroids are what is being used to recover from injury and prolong careers, right? Isn’t it Human Growth Hormone? I know my doctor prescribes it to patients, and I know a lot of people in the entertainment industry swear by it (youth is even more of at economic premium in Hollywood than it is in sports). Hormone replacement therapy is not the same as shooting ‘roids and turning into a homerun smashing Neanderthal with a 5 year life expectancy.

      That said, I declined the hgh. And though I’m not an elite athlete, I am a competitive endurance athlete and I can say that in my mid-40s, and without the “cheating”, I am the fastest I have ever been and my recovery time from events is half what it used to be. So it does happen on the natural mitochondrial level, fwiw.

    32. You bet your ass I’ll be using hormone replacement therapy when the time comes. YOLO.

    33. and the usual age related stuff.

      hahahahahahaha…yeah, i’m reaching that stage where i simply want to continue to be competitive in living…

    34. I wanna talk about a part of our offseason that doesn’t get talked about enough. I don’t care where they’re drafted, be it 1 or 60- rookies are supposed to earn their way on the court. Maybe that’s too much of an old school ideology for these times, but it’s the same no matter the walk of life- unless you’re a prodigy. To get on the court in year one, rookies typically have to outplay whomever is ahead of them at their position. That’s the way it’s meant to be..but teams who aren’t good tend to hand the keys to kids who aren’t ready just because they were drafted in the lottery. We’d all love for every draft pick to be ready to play consistently well in year one, but that’s just not the way it works.

      And I get it. Teams are investing millions into these kids, so they trow them to the wolves immediately and expect production commensurate with the investment. But what the Knicks have done is so true school. We drafted 2 really good players and CAN AFFORD to prepare them for a larger role commensurate with the investment. Most of the time, teams draft these kids and need them to play immediately. And that’s usually because they’re bad or they just don’t have a better option at the position the rookie plays.

      What is dope about what we have, is the fact that we have no need for our rookies to play right away. Ahead of Grimes we have RJ, Fournier, Burks, and Quickley. Ahead of McBride, we have Kemba, Rose, and Quickley. And Ahead of Sims,, we have Mitch, Noel, and Taj. With the flashes they’ve shown so far, it feels good to know that they can develop at their pace. It’s actually exciting to me because that is exactly how you build a team for the long haul. Yes, we lucked out on the cost for Rose, Kemba, Burks, and Noel. And Fournier wanted to be a Knick. But isn’t that as big a part of team building as drafting? The FO does not get applauded enough for their approach this offseason. Who cares if there were no flashy moves, y’kno?

    35. I assume high-level athletes use a cocktail of HGH, anabolic steroids, and whatever else their trainers/staff recommend. A tennis player isn’t going to be using anabolic steroids to the same extent as Mark McGwire or Sosa, they don’t need to be hulking behemoths, but they probably use lower doses to help their muscles recover during the tournament grind. Steroids do more than just inflate your muscles, that’s just the most visible, well-known effect.

    36. Didn’t Agassi admit to being high on crystal meth and successfully lying about it to get out of a suspension? If he’s going to admit to that in his book, wouldn’t he admit to whatever less-trashy drugs he was doing too?

    37. another guy who doesn’t pass the smell test of being all natural is playing QB right now for Tampa. No way Tom Brady is playing this long due to diet.

    38. anyone watch this netflix documentary on drummers called Count Me In? I got roped in. Hope they talk about pockets.

    39. Totes – I think we all gave the FO some plaudits after the Duece and Grimes show went well at Summer League. They are doing a fine job. I haven’t seen the rampant negativity of yesteryear much lately.

      Great match in the first semi. The volatility of women’s tennis is truly amazing. Leylah has beaten everybody in this tourney from absolutely nowhere.

    40. I agree with Totes point that we’re in a great position to bring young players along slowly, but that’s actually why I was annoyed we didn’t take the high ceiling prospects like Johnson, Johnson, and Jackson. I thought we were in great position to take guys like that who needed some time, and let them spend a year or 2 figuring it out in practice.

    41. i think women’s athletics are changing even faster than men’s athletics…they were doing the pre-match for tonight’s semi-final – when they spoke with maria sakkari, it was shocking how incredibly fit she was (currently she’s got a little too much power in her forward)…

      5’8″, about 140 of sheer muscle…if that’s your level of fitness, shoot maybe you can professionally compete til your late 30’s…

      it really struck me watching the olympics just how much women’s “fitness” seems to have improved…it’s good to see and it’s incredible…years ago i remember watching joanna jedrzejczyk and valentina shevchenko compete in mma, both primarily kick boxers…i’m no expert for sure – but, their technique looked flawless…

      nowadays you see some of the collegiate and high school softball players looking like maybe they might be on their way someday to the mlb…wouldn’t that be something…

    42. Hubert:
      I agree with Totes point that we’re in a great position to bring young players along slowly, but that’s actually why I was annoyed we didn’t take the high ceiling prospects like Johnson, Johnson, and Jackson. I thought we were in great position to take guys like that who needed some time, and let them spend a year or 2 figuring it out in practice.

      I don’t think McBride and Grimes have such limited ceilings that we should fret over passing over the guys you mentioned per se. And given our two PGs, having a combo guard who could help right away is a good thing. If you are saying that you wished we had drafted one of those 3 guys at #19, then picked Grimes at #25 and McBride at #32, that’s fair. But the team needed shooting, and Grimes and McBride both look like they can shoot.

    43. The men’s tennis situation is so different from the women’s. Three of the top four men’s seeds are in the semifinals. In the women’s singles finals a nineteen year old unseeded player will play an eighteen year old player who actually had to win three rounds in the qualification tournament just to get into the main draw of the tournament.

    44. Every single player in the NFL is doped the fuck up except maybe 2 or 3 kickers

      I remember those pictures of DK Metcalf making the rounds and being like, guys, you know this is what happens when you are a 99.999th percentile athlete AND you take the best steroids available.

    45. ***anyone watch this netflix documentary on drummers called Count Me In? I got roped in. Hope they talk about pockets.***

      Thanks for reminding me. I was listening to Talking Book the other day and thinking about JK and the “wide pocket”. The choices Stevie makes work perfectly (I mean, they are the best songs ever), but it seem like he makes a lot of decisions that I don’t think many other drummers (or at least many professionally trained drummers) would make. A lot of the time the drums are kind of getting in the way of the groove, but, like I said, his albums from the 70s couldn’t really be any better. JK— Would you consider his to be a “wide pocket” in the same sense as Ringo et al, or am I totally off with this?

    46. “Superstition” is a good example of a song with a wide pocket, that’s Stevie on drums. It’s like that snare hit comes just a split second late, makes the whole groove sound heavy. A good contrast would be the song “Sir Duke,” which is not Stevie on drums, it’s Raymond Pounds, who is much more of a tight pocket kind of guy. Same thing on the song “I Wish,” that’s Raymond Pounds. It’s a similar groove to “Superstition” but with a tight rather than wide pocket. To my ears anyway.

      Stevie’s drumming is a trip– he plays drums like a guy who doesn’t really play drums. He’s so good at music that he can just sort of play drums innately, but he’s not a schooled drummer in any kind of sense. Just an insanely naturally funky human being. The song “Maybe Your Baby” is one of my favorites on Talking Book. He’s playing drums on that but the drums aren’t really driving the song. The rhythm is all coming from the amazing clavinet playing and the greasy Minimoog bass. He’s kind of just noodling around on the drums in the background. And of course it’s great.

    47. Stevie toured with the Stones the year that both Talking Book and Exile on Main Street were released -’72. Woulda been fun to go to one of those.

    48. I was introducing my oldest daughter to Madonna this summer and didn’t realize just how good her drums were on those mid-80s records. Then saw that it was Tony Thompson (former Chic drummer) who played on Like A Virgin at the behest of Nile Rodgers.

      I tend to prefer ‘less is more’ drummers with great feel, I guess, like Helm and Starr.

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