Knicks Morning News (2014.09.25)

  • [New York Times] Qatar Out of Women’s Basketball Over Hijab Row (Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:53:52 GMT)

    Qatar pulled out of the women’s basketball competition at the Asian Games on Thursday after refusing to abide by international regulations preventing them from wearing hijabs, while organisers said they were powerless to do anything about it.

  • [New York Times] Phoenix Re-Sign Bledsoe to Five-Year Contract (Thu, 25 Sep 2014 04:55:35 GMT)

    The Phoenix Suns have agreed to a new five-year contract with restricted free agent Eric Bledsoe, the team said on Wednesday.

  • [New York Times] Phoenix Re-Sign Bledsoe to Five-Year Contract (Thu, 25 Sep 2014 03:52:35 GMT)

    The Phoenix Suns have agreed to a new five-year contract with restricted free agent Eric Bledsoe, the team said on Wednesday.

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Basketball: Bill Cartwright to Coach Mexico (Thu, 25 Sep 2014 03:28:15 GMT)

    The retired Chicago Bulls center Bill Cartwright was named the coach of Mexico’s national basketball team.

  • [New York Times] Suns, Bledsoe Agree to 5-Year, $70 Million Deal (Thu, 25 Sep 2014 01:26:43 GMT)

    The Phoenix Suns and point guard Eric Bledsoe have reached agreement on a five-year, $70 million contract, capping a long, sometimes-tense negotiation to keep him in the desert.

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    Mike Kurylo

    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    15 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2014.09.25)”

    1. I still don’t get the Bledsoe deal. Is he really worth that much??? Especially to Phoenix???

      So this is the last weekend before training camp. I’m more excited about this season than I have been for like the last 20 years. There’s something about having Phil back in the fold and listening to his candid musings. Is it finally true that Dolan is not going to meddle?

      I actually like the Knicks’ chances of being a surprise team. The expectations are so low that they can stay under the radar until the season gets underway. All the preseason games are low-profile, so they shouldn’t feel any real pressure until opening night. Seems like everyone is healthy coming into camp (as opposed to all the mysterious injuries last year to JR, Shump, Amar’e, KMart) Then there’s those first two high-profile b2b games. If we can get one of those, that would be a good sign. The real test will be when we play teams like Washington, Toronto, Atlanta, Charlotte and Brooklyn. The East is a step down from the West, but there is a real competitive balance in the hunt for the last 6 playoff spots.

    2. Bledsoe:

      If he plays as well as he did last year, he is absolutely worth that money. If he’s injured, he’s an albatross (and the Suns will be an 8 seed for all eternity).

      Dragic:

      The URL you posted says “Two-Year-$35M-Deal” and I thought, “Well, the NBA has officially gone crazy.” $3.5M sounds just fine to me.

    3. I’ve been leaving NBA TV on while doing chores around the house and there are 2 points I want to bring up.

      1. There was a replay of Miami vs. San Antonio where Dwyane Wade jumps into the defender as he’s taking a jumpshot. Of course it was called a shooting foul and he went to the line. I remember years ago when Allan Houston did the same thing to Steve Smith and nothing was called. The NBA has to review these flops after the game and suspend the player for 1 quarter of the next game. It never made sense to me that the price penalty was the same for a rookie or a highly paid player. A 4th quarter suspension would be a better penalty as it actually penalizes the team.

      2. I caught a replay of Game 6 (I think) of Miami vs New York 1997. Was there a reason why the suspensions were spread between 2 games? Allan Houston, Patrick Ewing, and Charlie Ward were suspended for Game 6 and Larry Johnson and John Starks were suspended for Game 7. Why couldn’t all those players be suspended for Game 6 and be ready at full strength for Game 7?

    4. “There was a replay of Miami vs. San Antonio where Dwyane Wade jumps into the defender as he’s taking a jumpshot. Of course it was called a shooting foul and he went to the line. I remember years ago when Allan Houston did the same thing to Steve Smith and nothing was called. The NBA has to review these flops after the game and suspend the player for 1 quarter of the next game. It never made sense to me that the price penalty was the same for a rookie or a highly paid player. A 4th quarter suspension would be a better penalty as it actually penalizes the team.”

      I think the players get too much scrutiny in these situations and the refs not enough. It’s not like a playground game where playing for calls is effectively bad manners – there’s somebody there who’s job it is to officiate it correctly. Why can’t the refs can’t be expected to do their job? If the offensive player jumps into the defensive player it should be a no call or an offensive foul, and for the most part these are very easy calls to make. If the ref just makes the correct call (which in fairness they sometimes do) then the shot usually ends up an awful one and the rbeak is going the other way. That’s the only penalty you need. If the refs just officiate the game well then that play will go away entirely.

    5. “there’s somebody there who’s job it is to officiate it correctly. Why can’t the refs can’t be expected to do their job? If the offensive player jumps into the defensive player it should be a no call or an offensive foul, and for the most part these are very easy calls to make.”

      That’s a really good point. I hate how players are starting to force contact on a jump shot more and more. In my mind they can’t be seriously making a legitimate shot attempt if they are purposely going out of their correct shooting stance/position to draw contact. I don’t mind seeing it on the drive, that’s just good aggressive play, but ultimately it’s the refs making the call and you probably can’t blame the players for doing something that is technically within the laws of the game. I wouldn’t mind seeing it called as an offensive foul when the defender is straight up.

    6. I watched an early ’90’s ECF game between Bulls and Cavs. It’s a shame how those Cavs teams were never fully appreciated in an historical sense. Definitely championship-caliber, just ran into very tough competition, i.e. Jordan’s Bulls.

    7. And Mark Price put up a few GOTME consideration seasons, too. He was a great PG that is barely ever talked about anymore.

      I loved that team. Daugherty, Price, Ron Harper, Larry Nance, Hot Rod Williams, Craig Ehlo. Agree, they were a championship caliber team that ran into a few insurmountable obstacles. (More so than the Knicks of that era? Maybe.)

    8. There’s no fucking way that the league is going to suspend players — absolutely the most important part of the game, of which there are maybe 2 or 3 recognizable names on each team, at most — due to flopping. They’ll fine them all day, even give them techs on the floor, but NO ONE will ever be suspended from a flop alone. Maybe from a tech suspension, tops.

    9. More on the 1992 Cavs– they had 3 starters with a +.200 WS/48. (Price, Daugherty, and Nance). Not sure how many teams have done that. The ’96 Bulls. Maybe a few others, but Miami’s Big Three never did it. Nor, it appears, has San Antonio’s. The Cavs had a real Big Three before it was even en vogue

    10. I caught a replay of Game 6 (I think) of Miami vs New York 1997. Was there a reason why the suspensions were spread between 2 games? Allan Houston, Patrick Ewing, and Charlie Ward were suspended for Game 6 and Larry Johnson and John Starks were suspended for Game 7. Why couldn’t all those players be suspended for Game 6 and be ready at full strength for Game 7?

      By NBA rule (Rule 12, Section VII(c)), no more than four players can be suspended for a game:

      A team must have a minimum of eight players dressed and ready to play in every game. If five or more players leave the bench, the players will serve their suspensions alphabetically, according to the first letters of their last name. If seven bench players are suspended (assuming no participants are included), four of them would be suspended for the first game following the altercation. The remaining three would be suspended for the second game following the altercation.

    11. Yeah, the worst thing about that situation was that they ended up being truly fucked by, of all things, the alphabet. The Knicks’ two main scorers were Houston and Ewing. Had they had either of them available for Game 6, I think that they would have won Game 6 (they just couldn’t score enough in that game. Chris Childs and Oakley combined for 31 shots!). However, alphabetically Ewing and Houston went first (with Johnson and Starks going for Game 7).

    12. Cronin, did you ever write a piece on the alphabetical damnation of the ’97 Knicks?

    13. No, but now that you mention it, it probably would make for a good piece. Heck, “The Alphabetical Damnation of the 1997 Knicks” is even a good title for a piece. ;)

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