Knicks Morning News (2014.09.09)

  • [New York Times] Furious Australia Slam Deliberate Defeat Allegations (Tue, 09 Sep 2014 08:36:30 GMT)

    Basketball Australia have reacted furiously to allegations their team deliberately lost a game at the World Cup last week, saying they were “downright wrong” and an insult to the country’s sporting culture.

  • [New York Times] International Basketball Not the Same as US Game (Tue, 09 Sep 2014 07:51:34 GMT)

    The ball was bouncing away, threatening New Zealand’s last-chance possession, though if a player could just dive on the floor and corral it, any NBA fan would know what to do.

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Basketball: FIBA Inquiry on Australia (Tue, 09 Sep 2014 05:04:13 GMT)

    Basketball’s governing body, FIBA, opened disciplinary proceedings against Australia over allegations that it lost a World Cup game against Angola.

  • [New York Times] Phoenix Dominates WNBA Finals Opener (Tue, 09 Sep 2014 01:54:39 GMT)

    Brittney Griner swatted her way into the record books. Candice Dupree made just about every shot she took. Diana Taurasi dominated in all aspects.

  • [New York Times] Hawks Owner Had His Struggles With Two Atlanta Sports Franchises (Tue, 09 Sep 2014 01:20:27 GMT)

    Bruce Levenson, who said Sunday he would sell his controlling interest in the basketball team as a result of a racially charged email he wrote in 2012, also owned the N.H.L.’s Thrashers.

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    Mike Kurylo

    Mike Kurylo is the founder and editor of KnickerBlogger.net. His book on the 2012 Knicks, "We’ll Always Have Linsanity," is on sale now. Follow him on twitter (@KnickerBlogger).

    56 thoughts to “Knicks Morning News (2014.09.09)”

    1. Three thoughts –
      If reports are true, what Danny Ferry said is much much worse than what the owner said.
      I’m not sure why people are so stunned by the Ray Rice video. She was unconscious when he dragged her off the elevator. How did people think she got that way? By the way, WArren Moon, Jason Kidd and Lance Stephenson were all guilty of the same crime. Where is the outrage?
      I sure hope the Knicks pick up their new offense faster than the Giants.

    2. Yeah, with the clarity more information has brought, Ferry is the one who really needs to be fired.

      Speaking of clarity, both the Hawks stuff and the Rice stuff have been covered very oddly by ESPN because the bulk of the actual reporting has been by outside sources and they appear to be wary of leaning too heavily on outside sources so as a result we get this sort of patchy reporting. It is kind of weird. Like when the Rice stuff broke, I thought that there were two different videos from different times, that’s how oddly ESPN reported it, mostly because the information was coming almost entirely from TMZ.

    3. I’m not sure why people are so stunned by the Ray Rice video. She was unconscious when he dragged her off the elevator. How did people think she got that way?

      Right? I’ve been wondering the same thing.

      Meanwhile no one cares that Ray McDonald or Greg Hardy played yesterday, despite battering their wives.

      People only get outraged when you force them to see it.

    4. It is evident that Ray Rice is a jerk, but the media and NFL did far more harm to Janay than her husband.

      Sadly, statistics point to domestic violence being pervasive. I got this stat off of this site: http://www.americanbar.org/groups/domestic_violence/resources/statistics.html

      25% of women, 7.6% of men were raped and/or physically assaulted by a current or former spouse or partner. If we’re talking 25%, how many NFL’ers is that? How many NBA players? Matt Barnes and Jason Kidd? Without mitigating the severity of the domestic violence crime, shouldn’t there be an equal focus on drunk driving?

    5. Right? I’ve been wondering the same thing.

      Meanwhile no one cares that Ray McDonald or Greg Hardy played yesterday, despite battering their wives.

      People only get outraged when you force them to see it.

      It’s just everybody wanting to make sure they sound the most aggrieved and sanctimonious about the whole thing capped off by the Ravens and the NFL trying to one up each other by releasing him and the league suspending him indefinitely. Meanwhile like you pointed out we have guys with the same kind of issues around them playing on Sunday, but since the national media hasn’t reported on it nobody seems to give a shit, which is interesting since the national media has been very vehement in their zero tolerance stance against those who have been accused of domestic abuse regardless of who they are.

      The NFL is such a joke with all of that shit. A league where smoking pot is treated like a major crime while players pump HGH and all kinds of PED’s into their bodies while teams, front office executives, owners, reporters and league personnel all look the other way and preach about the morality of the game. I completely stopped believing everything the NFL was selling as some pure product that cared about that kind of stuff when Donte Stallworth was reinstated into the league a year after running a guy over while he was driving drunk.

    6. I can’t say I follow the NFL very closely, but the only reason I know about the McDonald and Hardy stuff is because people ARE talking about it now in the aftermath of what went on with Rice. It doesn’t seem like the tide of public opinion is going to swing against them as forcefully as it has against Rice, but to say that nobody is talking about it is clearly wrong.

      Also, I’m legitimately curious what the point of such complaints are. Are you saying people are more upset about Rice than they should be, or less upset about all these other guys than they should be? If the answer is the latter I would point out that the outrage over Rice, while certainly disproportionate, clearly serves to increase rather than decrease the attention on other crimes of the same nature. Even if not enough people are talking about Hardy in an absolute sense there are clearly more people talking about it today than there would be in the absence of all the Rice talk. On the other hand if the answer is that you think people are too upset about the Rice thing, it seems like couching it in in terms of “Why aren’t people talking about Hardy?” is essentially BS designed to cover for the fact that what you mean is “What’s the big deal?”.

    7. Yeah, football’s grip on me had been slipping for a very long time. There is so much wrong with the entire institution, from the NFL, to the NCAA, to the high schools. I’m trying to do my part to let it die by walking away. It’s easy now (I spent Sunday kayaking up in Norwalk, because it was gorgeous out). It will probably drag me back in when it’s cold and dark in November. But I’ll probably just be in it for the social aspect.

      Anyway, re: Danny Ferry, let’s not forget this guy is the same cunt who backhand slapped Marcus Camby in the face (on MLK Day, coincidentally). If I recall, he got off with a slap on the wrist while Camby got suspended five games for trying to punch him and missing (and hitting JVG). Rot in racist hell, Danny.

    8. Back in my Madden playing days, I’d always substitute out Leonard Little.

      If you were using the Warner-Faulk-Bruce-Holt Rams in Madden back then you were pretty much cheating! ;)

    9. I can’t say I follow the NFL very closely, but the only reason I know about the McDonald and Hardy stuff is because people ARE talking about it now in the aftermath of what went on with Rice.

      The problem is that nobody in the media is calling for Hardy to be banished for life from the sport. While I’m not sure what the exact punishment for Rice should be (maybe 1-year suspension and then apply for reinstatement subject to various clauses) I think Hardy should be facing the same kind of punishment. McDonald at the minimum shouldn’t have played on Sunday and should be suspended with pay until more is learned about what unfolded.

      On the other hand if the answer is that you think people are too upset about the Rice thing, it seems like couching it in in terms of “Why aren’t people talking about Hardy?” is essentially BS designed to cover for the fact that what you mean is “What’s the big deal?”.

      No, I think the media and people in general like to get very sanctimonious about an issue like this when it’s shoved in their face like it was yesterday with a video that was leaked by TMZ. The fact is though that Ray Rice isn’t the only guy out there having committed such a heinous act, so while I think it’s good that he is getting a much stiffer punishment now and more proportionate to his crime, there are a lot of other people who for one reason or another escape that level of scrutiny and punishment unjustly.

      I could care less if people are talking about Hardy and McDonald now. Those guys deserve as much attention and press for the horrible acts they committed as much as Rice even if there isn’t a video out there to get everybody worked up over. For that matter I can’t really take ESPN, sports media or people seriously when Ray Rice is getting deservedly destroyed for what he did and Floyd “serial woman beater” Mayweather gets free pass after free pass.

    10. How do you guys feel about what Chris Canty said on how it was irresponsible for the media to play the video? I for one agree…..these ppl dont care about the issue they care about ratings

    11. er,

      No.

      Why do you think the video gets ratings? Because we love seeing a 220 lbs. man strike his wife after an argument? Strike her hard enough to knock her out cold?

      No, it’s because this is a millionaire athlete who received a slap on the wrist from a billion-dollar organization because of his “ability” to garner ratings. Because it took “this video” for him to receive his due punishment from his employers. And still, with this video being in the possession of the state (and quite obviously within the eyeshot of the NFL, an enormously-powerful institution in this country), he virtually escapes prosecution and receives a slap on the wrist from the judicial system.

      When he knocked his wife out in a public place, it became a public issue. When law enforcement in NJ decided to let him off, it became a public issue. When the NFL chose to give him a punishment lighter than they give pot smokers, it became a public issue. If you think that he should be protected from the court of public opinion, that’s on you. He shouldn’t.

    12. Agreed. If this case were properly handled by all parties involved, then maybe you have a reason for not showing the video. As it is, the video has to be seen to grasp the total negligence of the law enforcement and DA office, and possible cover up, or at least grossly inept investigation, by the NFL. The video probably would never have been leaked if the situation was handled properly.

    13. Well as far as the prosecutors……. they said that the pre trial intervention was normal for first time offenders

    14. Why do you think the video gets ratings? Because we love seeing a 220 lbs. man strike his wife after an argument? Strike her hard enough to knock her out cold?

      While I agree the video and the questions it raises are a legitimate public issue if you think TMZ posted it in order to raise issues about domestic violence you’re crazy. The same people who click on beheading videos and naked pics of celebrities/celebrities behaving badly are lapping this stuff up.

    15. @13

      No, it’s because this is a millionaire athlete who received a slap on the wrist from a billion-dollar organization because of his “ability” to garner ratings. Because it took “this video” for him to receive his due punishment from his employers.

      Oh? And who decides what “due punishment” is? That’s why we have a legal system.

      This is ALL about TMZ getting ratings. If the NFL is serious about this then they need to pick out EVERY active player that has been arrested for this crime and dole out equal punishment. And what about all the drunk drivers in the NBA and NFL? Over 10,000 people were killed by drunk drivers in 2012.

      http://responsibility.org/drunk-driving/drunk-driving-fatalities-national-statistics

    16. Bro, there’s a substantial difference between the court of public opinion and the court that can send you to prison. Let’s not conflate or confuse the two.

    17. Anyone else think that it’s more than a little hypocritical/ironic that the organization that cut Ray Rice for hitting his wife is the same organization that recently saw fit to erect a statue honoring a guy who might have committed a murder but, at the very least, hindered the investigation of, and helped others literally get away with, murder.

    18. It’s interesting to see how the NFL have handled the domestic abuse situation. In the Australian Football League any serious offense outside of the organisation is usually met with the player being fired and other teams not wanting to go near them with a 100 ft. pole.

      You’ll have to forgive me if I am totally wrong on this point, but my understanding on the polarising penalties between drug use and domestic violence is that illicit drug use is covered in the NFL by-laws, whereas other serious offences (e.g. domestic abuse) aren’t. So in saying that the NFL have the mechanisms to hand out harsher penalties for drug violations, whereas they might not for other criminal offences, therefore any harsh penalty could be subject to arbitration. Like I said, I could be totally wrong about that. My Knowledge of NFL rules and laws is fairly limited ha ha .

    19. Yes, but because they couldn’t make the charges stick, he’s “innocent.” Or at least that’s what ESPN says.

    20. Amazing how many people think that “not guilty” and “innocent” are the same thing. In Lewis’s case, the murder charges didn’t stick, but he did plead guilty to obstruction of justice for hindering a murder investigation, so ESPN is really dancing on the head of a pin with that justification.

    21. I am saddened by the whole Rice affair. My wife’s grandfather is in the Rutger’s sports hall of fame and her uncle is a huge Rutgers booster who contributes a lot to the University. When Rice was a star there and my son was like 9, Uncle M used to take us to the President’s Club where we would meet the players, get autographs, etc. We met Ray several times, and he presented like a terrific guy in every way. We still have autographed #27 jerseys, balls and hats in my son’s closet. His coaches, fans and even crotchety Uncle M had nothing but nice things to say about him. Even during his pro career, I never heard a negative thing said about him (but did about many other star players at Rutgers.) And I had no indication that he was capable of what he did, considering that I followed him closely since his first year at Rutgers and heard him talked about often. It was truly shocking to me, on the level of the whole Joe Paterno thing.

      I think he deserved to get suspended for a lengthy period of time, and to go through the criminal process. But what I saw on the video was exactly what I thought had happened (i.e. there was no cover up, he essentially admitted that he knocked her out with a punch from the beginning, and that was the story in the media.) Rightfully or wrongfully, his good reputation before this incident, his taking full responsibility afterwards, and that the act seemed impuldive and not premeditated, contributed to the soft treatment he got.

      So I don’t get why the video changed anything after the fact. There were no revelations in the video. Why did the Ravens cut him and the Commish increase his suspension when the video didn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know?

    22. Great post Z man. I think that Rice was punished for the backlash from the original punishment being too lenient. Once they had the visceral tape out, they felt like the backlash would intensify and decided to drop the hammer on Rice. So in reality the nfl going soft initially ended up causing him his career

    23. Carton made a good point today. The league just negotiated a 6 game suspension for first time offenders. Why was rice suspended indefinitely?

      Is the NFL making the case that domestic violence that wasn’t captured on tape less egregious?

    24. So I don’t get why the video changed anything after the fact. There were no revelations in the video. Why did the Ravens cut him and the Commish increase his suspension when the video didn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know?

      There’s actually a very simple answer to that question:

      They thought they could get away with it.

      Thankfully TMZ did what the fourth estate is supposed to do and they held our higher institutions accountable by exposing what they attempted to cover up. Whether they did it for self-promotion or clicks is irrelevant. Thank god they did.

      And yes, it is very sad that TMfuckingZ is the only media outlet that was capable of carrying out its journalistic duty to uncover the truth. That’s some Season 5 of The Wire shit.

    25. But Hubert, there was no cover up! We knew exactly what happened, even without seeing the video. Truthfully, did anything you saw on the video differ with your understanding of what happened BEFORE you saw the video?

      I agree that the suspension was too lenient, and that the NFL exploited the opportunity to save face. But was it justifiable for them to do so based on a video just confirming what was already known. If anything, it made Ray Rice seem more honest. If the video had shown that he punched her several times or something else that differed from the story that was out there, I would call it “exposing a cover-up.” But that didn’t happen!

    26. “So I don’t get why the video changed anything after the fact. There were no revelations in the video. Why did the Ravens cut him and the Commish increase his suspension when the video didn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know?”

      Z-Man –

      Here’s what I think happened. When Rice was negotiating the 2 game suspension with the league he likely gave a very soft version of what happened. His wife, Janay, also made some statements both to the prosecutors and the NFL that she played a part in it. I think, based off this information, the league went with two games.

      The video, in my eyes, shouldn’t change anything, but I think the league didn’t think that’s what exactly happened in the elevator.

      Putting all that aside, the true problem with the NFL playing moral compass and trying to set social standards is that the victims are put into a terrible position. They now have to testify outside of court against their spouse in the public spotlight, and such testimony will guarantee fiscal harm to his/her family. The NFL should create a privacy policy and find ways to handle this with one goal in mind – protecting the victim. It’s the only thing that matters here.

    27. @Z-Man

      You really don’t think there was a cover up here? This is the NFL we’re talking about, an organization that wields a lot of power. I find it very hard to believe that Goodell or nobody in the league office was able to see the video until yesterday, yet TMZ was able to unearth this video. If anything I would think it possible they didn’t exert themselves in attempting to get a copy of the video, understanding the kind of impact a visual would have on an issue that was already turning into a PR nightmare for them.

      The coverup here wasn’t about hiding what happened in the elevator, but trying to brush it under the rug as quickly as possible while limiting exposure of the event to people. Noted NFL mouthpiece Peter King, a few months ago himself stated that he had a source that told him people in the league office had certainly seen the video from inside the elevator. Lo and behold yesterday when the tape released and the NFL was busy doing damage control, King retracted the statement from his “impeccable” source because the league office told him they hadn’t seen the tape which was apparently good enough for him.

      I do agree with you however that the punishment doled out by the NFL after the video came out is absurd since it was common knowledge what happened in the elevator even before that. This again shows how arbitrary Goodell’s power is and how dangerous that can be, although in this scenario I think the more recent punishment is far more in line with the incident than the 2-game suspension initially handed to Rice.

      His wife, Janay, also made some statements both to the prosecutors and the NFL that she played a part in it. I think, based off this information, the league went with two games.

      The dumbest thing the NFL did was interview Janay and Ray together. Seems highly inappropriate given the incident at hand.

    28. lp, but there was already a video of him dragging his unconscious wife out of the elevator and it was understood how she became unconscious. What would be the point of lying about the video from the elevator? If there was proof that Goodell is lying and that he saw the video and purposely covered the video up, he’d be in WAY more hot water than he is now.

    29. But Hubert, there was no cover up! We knew exactly what happened, even without seeing the video. Truthfully, did anything you saw on the video differ with your understanding of what happened BEFORE you saw the video?

      Me? No. But don’t forget the NFL used its lackeys in the media (most notably Chris Mortensen & Peter King, among many others) to tell us that the entire video showed things that mitigated what Rice did. They said he was attacked in the elevator (which, by the very loosest definition of the word “attack”, he technically was before he cold clocked his wife). They thought, if we didn’t see it, that their bullshit explanation might hold water with some people. That some people might think she provoked him, or that she deserved it. Or that they wouldn’t care.

      Now they can’t hide behind that bullshit, so they’ve been forced to change course.

    30. How many people who are indignant that Ray Rice wasn’t punished more severely originally were big Jason Kidd fans when he was with the Knicks? In case you forgot, he beat his wife, too. Or thought that it would be great if the Knicks somehow acquired Lance Stephenson? He only smashed his pregnant girlfriend’s face into a stair. The fact that there is no video of these events doesn’t mean that they didn’t happen or that they were any less heinous than the Ray Rice incident.

    31. You’re right, johnno. The NBA, under Stern, had an absysmal record with regards to punishing domestic violence. Someone, at the time of Rice’s initial suspension, did a pretty good write up about them being worse than the NFL. (Tried to google it, but it wasn’t on the first two pages so I gave up!)

    32. Seriously fuck Floyd Mayweather

      I remember that some interview Mayweather did before some big sporting event to promote his next fight. It wasn’t the superbowl, may have been NCAA finals or something. Anyway, the studio hosts ask if it was hard for Mayweather to stay in shape and stay focused after spending time in jail, like his arrest was almost an accident. I sit there thinking to myself “He beat up his fiance! Maybe he should feel like shit.” and Floyd goes on to talk about the struggles he had during the whole process. FFS.

    33. Going on CNBC’s Street Signs today between 2 – 3 to discuss why I think Roger Goodell will not survive the Ray Rice fiasco. My points, in advance:

      1. Either Goodell is lying when he says no one from the NFL front office saw the in-elevator video until this week, in which case he should be fired OR Goodell went ahead an imposed discipline on Ray Rice knowing that the in-elevator video was out there, likely to surface and did not take the simple steps necessary to obtain the video, in which case he should be fired for failing to “Protect The Shield”.

      2. I am very skeptical of Goodell’s claim that no one from the NFL front office saw the in-elevator video until this week. During the last week of July, immediately after Goodell suspended Rice for two games, Peter King and others reported that
      A. the NFL front office had seen the video,
      B. it was extremely brutal (others reported the precise sequence of events),
      C. King himself had not seen the video.
      The NFL did not deny the story at the time. Even if King (and others) got it wrong – which I doubt – I cannot imagine that Goodell’s minions (if not Goodell) then ignored the story and did not attempt to obtain the video. If Goodell is lying (or if an NFL contractor, rather than employee, saw the video), he will be exposed and fired.

      3. If Goodell really did not see the video, he should be fired for incompetence. Asking for the video from the prosecutor’s office was guaranteed to fail, because the DA is governed by Grand Jury secrecy. But Ray Rice had an absolute right to the video in his criminal case and Goodell could have demanded that Rice turn it over as part of the investigation. Going to the DA is like going to a priest and asking what was said in confessional. You get the information from the penitent. Goodell has, literally, a platoon of former AUSAs and FBI agents at the NFL front office who would have explained this.

    34. lp, but there was already a video of him dragging his unconscious wife out of the elevator and it was understood how she became unconscious. What would be the point of lying about the video from the elevator? If there was proof that Goodell is lying and that he saw the video and purposely covered the video up, he’d be in WAY more hot water than he is now.

      I think the point in lying about the video from the elevator was so that people might think the bullshit excuse that his wife provoked him or was attacking him. Now that the video has been released there is no way that theory has any credibility.

      Why would ESPN or NFL lackeys like Peter King criticize Goodell or the NFL to the fullest extent? Don’t bite the hand that feeds you, especially when that hand is worth well into the billions in revenue and profit year after year.

      When has the press taken the NFL to task for treating players like dispensable property to be discarded once it is no longer in vogue? Haven’t the press basically turned a blind eye to the obvious and rampant use of PED’s and HGH in the NFL very similar to how they once did the same in baseball? Or how about these same people failing to really take on the fact that for years and years the NFL lied to players about the dangers of the game and were more than happy to shove painkillers down their throat so they could get back on the field ASAP.

      I’m sorry but there is no way I’ll believe that fucking TMZ could get their hands on this tape, but the NFL who was investigating the matter and is incredibly powerful and well connected couldn’t get the tape.

    35. Terry O’Neil, the Prez of NOW, nailed it in these comments:

      “The NFL has lost its way. It doesn’t have a Ray Rice problem; it has a violence against women problem,” O’Neill said in a statement. “… The only workable solution is for Roger Goodell to resign, and for his successor to appoint an independent investigator with full authority to gather factual data about domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking within the NFL community, and to recommend real and lasting reforms.”\

      The key here is that the DV work and discipline done by the NFL should be confidential and independent from the NFL itself. Only way to even attempt to protect the victims. Never should a beaten spouse have to decide the employment fate of his or her abusing spouse. We should be able to figure out what happened without directly speaking to the victim.

    36. From today’s NY Times:

      Take another case on the same football team: In 2012, Candace Williams, the girlfriend of another Ravens player, Terrell Suggs, filed a protective order against him claiming that he had punched her and dragged her alongside a car he was driving. Previously, she had accused him of pouring bleach on her and her son, and breaking her nose.

      A few weeks later they wed. “Last night I married my best friend and the love of my life,” Mr. Suggs posted on Facebook.

      This whole thing has been so badly handled by everyone involved, and only made worse by how ineptly domestic violence has been handled up to this point by the NFL (and other sports). Lance Stephenson pushing his girlfriend down the stairs then going down to smash her head on the bottom step? No problem, no suspension, no nothing. The list is endless.

    37. What do we do with all these fellows? I’m not trying to defend them. Should they all be banished, put through the criminal justice system? What happens to their child support payments (which I am sure a fair percentage have) when they are no longer employed and presumably employable? Do we start extending this into other lines of work? I saw circulating on Facebook some guy was ousted as a CEO of some food services vendor in the NY metropolitan area b/c a video showed him kicking a dog and yanking it’s leash so that it was off the ground. At any rate I anxiously await Jason Kidd’s forced resignation …

    38. The only workable solution is for Roger Goodell to resign

      He made $44 million last year. He’s not resigning.

      He’s also making the other owners richer every day, so they’re not going to ask him to resign.

      And his players’ union has about as much power as a class of kindergarteners, so they can’t force him to resign.

      Roger Gooddell is here to stay, and no one will be talking about this in a few weeks. Then we’ll probably get an uptick in October when the league laughably starts to wear pink in order to promote women’s health. Then it will go away until there is video of the next guy hitting his wife.

      Seriously, this is a league where a guy allegedly suffering from brain trauma caused by playing football dragged the mother of his child to practice, shot her in the head in front of his coaches, then shot himself, and the band played on.

      Expect nothing.

    39. He didn’t drag her to practice. He murdered her in their home and then drove to the practice facility and shot himself in front of his coaches. Romeo Crennel and Scott Pioli watched it happen and still work for a league that condones the head trauma that produces a significantly-greater chance of committing these acts of violence. Nothing is expected.

    40. Nice appearance Ephus. I have to say that the more things come out here the more it just seems like Goodell isn’t very sharp (which seems impossible for somebody who has climbed the ladder at what seems to be an extremely cynical and, frankly, nefarious organization). I agree with you that I do think this is likely going to end up costing him his job, and it’s just so, so self-inflicted. At every turn he has brought this down on himself and made things worse when frankly it was, from his perspective, a minor issue (not to downplay the truly horrible shit Rice did, I’m just saying if when the Rice thing first leaked you had suggested this had the potential to bring down Goodell everyone would have laughed in your face). I haven’t been able to come up with any understanding of his actions throughout this process that makes rational sense to me. Just a disaster.

    41. Link to my appearance on CNBC earlier today (before the revelation that the NFL received the in-elevator video in April) predicted that Goodell would (and should) be fired.

      http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000309578

      Ephus, I can’t help but notice that at no point during that segment did you mention the prestigious community here at Knickerblogger. Next time you’re on TV, I’d really appreciate a shout out like this…

      “…and to quote Kahnzy on Knickerblogger, blah blah blah…”

      Please and thank you.

      Also, I agree wholeheartedly with you. If Goodell still has his job in two weeks, I’ll be stunned.

    42. Also, what that non-Knickerbloggerian was saying made sense, only I think that it’ll be because of the brand that the owners will get rid of him. Whether mainstream media is picking this up for ratings or to draw attention to domestic violence doesn’t matter; it’s out there and it’s big news. I can’t imagine the owners are overly pleased at this.

    43. I have to say that the more things come out here the more it just seems like Goodell isn’t very sharp (which seems impossible for somebody who has climbed the ladder at what seems to be an extremely cynical and, frankly, nefarious organization)

      Over the years, I have heard from multiple people who have worked inside NFL headquarters that Goodell was viewed as an inferior candidate to Pasch, but that Goodell’s outside supporters (friends of his father – Sen. Charles Goodell – Rockefeller Republican) put their thumbs on the scale. In the last couple of days, there are a bunch of people going around 399 Park saying under their breathe “That’s what you get for nepotism.”

    44. Seriously, ephus, next time you need to start with “As DRed from Knickerblogger says about high efficiency medium volume scorers . . .” But nice work otherwise. Goodell earning 44 million a year to be this ham handed is pretty amazing. I could seriously do a much better job for 8 million a year.

    45. ephus,

      Nice bit. It’s clear that you and the gentleman to your right have very different backgrounds. I bet a marketing consultant thinks something like, “Just give it a couple weeks, don’t do anything. Just wait it out.” That sounds like a hard job.

      Also, can you get me on the panel next time? I’d like to be introduced as R____ _______, Sr. Strategic Consultant at His Own Mom’s Basement.

    46. My dream panel would include THCJ (under whatever nom de plume he is using that day) and Ruruland. It would have the same easy flow as the Akroyd – Curtain debates on early SNL.

      Thanks to all for the kind words.

    47. “Ferry is the one who really needs to be fired”

      I suspect it won’t happen for a while, for a few reasons. For starters, as reported by Woj this whole thing is little moar than a power play. Atlanta’s minority owners could care less if Ferry is a racist (see their total indifference upon reading Levenson’s letter), their whole deal is that they despise Ferry but never had the majority shares needed to boot him. This was just the smoking gun they needed to get Ferry to hang himself.

      As for Levenson, at the end of the day the Atlanta Hawks consistently rank at the bottom of the league’s profits/losses. Last year they finished third behind only the Nets and Washington in losses. Even after revenue sharing they still came out $13 million in the hole. The point is I think Levenson could give two craps about being “forced” to sell the team because selling has been the goal for awhile now. So for a guy who just wants off the ride, why bother going thru the whole process of firing/searching/hiring a guy when you plan on cashing out all your chips in a few months anyway. And the guy who just hired might be immediately let go at that.

      Once the sale happens, is when I suspect we’ll see all the various parties make their power grab and when Ferry quietly gets the boot.

    48. If Danny Ferry survives (and I think the jury is still out), it will be because:

      1. he is second-generation NBA aristocracy – Bob Ferry was a player and Washington’s GM;
      2. he has built upon that base with his own ties throughout the league from Duke, his years as a player and later GM;
      3. he is a non-threatening, intelligent white guy.

      Part of the story here is white skin privilege. Ferry has been thought of as one of the good guys for so long around the league that people would rather twist themselves into logical pretzels to excuse his actions then change their paradigm about him.

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