Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Sunday, April 20, 2014

“We’ll Always Have Linsanity” A Reading at the Housing Works, June 19 at 7 p.m.

Meet the authors of We’ll Always Have Linsanity in a reading at the Housing Works on Wednesday, June 19, at 7 p.m., hosted by Deadspin founder Will Leitch. Listen to their take on the infamous season of Linsanity, ask them questions about the past season, and get them on record about their predictions for next season. Most importantly, share a moment with fellow Knicks fans in the aftermath of their most successful season in more than a decade, yet one that left many Knicks fans disappointed–as usual.

Housing Works is located 126 Crosby Street in Manhattan. It is one of downtown New York’s most vital cultural institutions, presenting an eclectic mix of events — from readings and concerts to comedy nights and storytelling competitions – featuring many of today’s most exciting artists. The bookstore is staffed almost entirely by volunteers and 100 percent of its profits go to Housing Works, Inc., which provides housing, healthcare, job training, and advocacy for New Yorkers living with HIV/AIDS. As an independent cultural center, it offers patrons a unique opportunity to join the fight against AIDS and homelessness simply by buying or donating books; eating at our cafe; coming to concerts, readings, and special events; or volunteering on our staff.

We’ll Always Have Linsanity: Strange Takes from the Knicks’ Strangest Season is a collection from writers working in a variety of outlets. Hunter S. Thompson once said, “When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro,” and the New York Knicks are one weird team, so these bloggers use zombies, psychiatrist couches, personal narratives, and almost every medium they can to understand the psyche of the Knick fan.

We’ll Always Have Linsanity collects these responses in a book that’s neither a memoir nor a history nor a yearbook, but a document that recounts what happened on the court and what happened in the mind of the fan. Reminiscent of Frederick Exley’s A Fan Notes, We’ll Always Have Linsanity argues that to really understand a team you must understand those who watch. And those watching the Knicks were strange indeed.

The book is the first from 99, a press devoted to bringing short, compelling books to readers.