Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Sunday, April 20, 2014

The Fine Print

Cutting Jeremy Tyler, which the Knicks did on Friday, will likely have zero impact on the 2013-2014 season. Tyler has bounced around on the end of NBA benches, in the D-League and abroad. He is injured. He also, as Robert astutely points out, might rejoin the team very shortly, as it is unlikely that a team will bother to pick up a marginal, injured player.

In other words, in the grand scheme of things, Friday’s roster moves — in which the Knicks kept Chris Smith in favor of several clearly superior players, including Tyler and Ike Diogu – will likely prove irrelevant.

But in some ways, this is precisely the point. Friday was just the latest in a line of examples of an ownership that clearly doesn’t sweat the small stuff, a front office that doesn’t appreciate its assets or how tiny details can make an impact.

To illustrate the point, let’s throw out a few examples:

– The Knicks bid against themselves to trade for Carmelo Anthony. I really, really don’t want to get into it. It’s obviously a trade you  do again. But, after the deal, John Hollinger wrote, “Anthony became the first player in memory to issue a trade demand and then list one team that he’d accept a trade to.” The Knicks had the clear upper hand, yet ownership, transfixed by Anthony’s star power, threw in extra pieces almost at will to a leverage-less Nuggets team. What began as a deal centered around Wilson Chandler and a smaller, second piece turned into Danilo Gallinari, Timofey Mosgov, a first-round pick (in this year’s loaded draft), two second-rounders, $6 million in cash and exchanging Raymond Felton for Chauncey Billups. The same Billups whose onerous contract required the Knicks to amnesty him for the team to sign Tyson Chandler.

The Knicks trade three players and two second-round draft picks for Marcus Camby. Camby was 38 at the time of the deal.

– The Knicks don’t attach a team option to Chris Copeland’s deal. Copeland was a 28-year-old rookie who bounced around Europe for years and had few, if any, NBA suitors. Don’t think that team option — a no-downside move that would have enabled the Knicks to keep Cope this year — would have been a dealbreaker for him.

– The Knicks trade a first-round pick and two second-round picks in the Andrea Bargnani trade. Like the trade or not, like Bargnani or not — it doesn’t take 3 draft picks to get Raptors GM Masai Ujiri to say yes.

– The Knicks cut Ike Diogu and Jeremy Tyler to keep Chris Smith.

These unnecessary add-ins, oversights and concessions are all small. But they point to a front office that has a track record of a reckless and cavalier attitude toward the tiny details. When you make enough of these decisions, one is bound to hurt, or at least a combination of these moves will. It’s just a late first-round pick. It’s just a 15th man. It’s just a backup center. It’s just a guy who’s shown a bit of flash in the preseason. Sometimes, that perspective is important. But these decisions build up, and show clearly that ownership is far too flippant about draft picks and smaller assets.

The most successful and lauded franchises expressly care about this stuff. The Spurs are a model franchise because they run a player development system explicitly designed to maximize players’ strengths and minimize their flaws. San Antonio is a small market and, thanks to prolonged success, the team has had late-round draft picks for more than a decade. But they scour the league for overlooked players and second-round picks and take any small advantage they can get.

Some — even the vast majority — of those reclamation projects and extra assets the Spurs take on don’t work out. Most 2nd round picks don’t turn into Manu Ginobili or DeJuan Blair. And most excuse-me trade thrown-ins don’t turn out to be, in the case of the Magic, Tobias Harris.

But some do. Anyone who watched second-round pick (46th overall) and twice-cut Danny Green and undrafted Gary Neal wreak havoc on the Heat in Game 3 of the NBA Finals knows this.

Perhaps most tragically, the Knicks are exactly the type of team that should benefit on the margins. New York offers the biggest market in the country and is one of the most attractive places in the league to play. Rotation players like Metta World Peace and Beno Udrih take discounts to play for the team. The Knicks should seize an advantage on the margins of a salary-cap league, not lose one.

The Knicks begin their season tomorrow, and this will likely soon be forgotten. And maybe that’s healthier — basketball is fun, the Knicks will be good, Jeremy Tyler and Ike Diogu almost certainly won’t affect this season.

But know this: The best front offices understand that every asset has some value, potential or otherwise. The small stuff matters, and catches up to you eventually. The Knicks haven’t yet figured that out.

75 comments on “The Fine Print

  1. Nick C.

    The knee jerk hamatuer psychology theory would be it is related to an owner that inherited the job and as such never had to worry about details.

  2. Frank

    Great article Jonathan. I agree completely with the overall premise, if not with some of the details. I don’t blame the front office (or even Dolan) so much for the Melo trade – I’ll place the blame for that squarely on the shoulders of Melo and CAA for not sticking to their guns and taking all leverage away from the Nuggets. By even entertaining Prokhorov for a conversation, they created uncertainty — uncertainty that Melo wouldn’t completely just chase the $ and go to the Nets even if it wasn’t his preferred location. And at the end of the day, if Melo just said “Knicks or free agency, and if you choose FA, then you get nothing”, Ujiri would have traded him to the Knicks for a MUCH smaller haul, because he’s too smart just to let Melo go for nothing. It was a game of poker and everyone (including but not ONLY the Knicks FO) except Ujiri blinked.

    But the rest of the article is right on — you cannot just give assets away for nothing, even if you don’t value them as highly as others. And maybe at the end of the day that’s part of why Grunwald got the boot. Great talent evaluator, terrible negotiator. And negotiating is at least 50% of the GM job.

  3. DBQ

    Spot on sir. Couldn’t agree more

    I would even go farther back and look at ill-fated trades like McDyess for Camby, Jackson, and the 2002 7th overall pick (Nene). Doing things like giving overmatched Don Chaney a contract extension, and Allan Houston that ridiculous $100 million deal. The Layden/Isiah era set the tone for all of these subsequent mishaps.

  4. thenamestsam

    Frank:
    btw, great article on LBJ at Bleacher Report. Really worth reading.

    As an aside, has any website come as far as B/R? It used to be filled with linkbait and those annoying 50 page slideshows, and now they have real killer content written by real talent.

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1828847-lebron-james-discusses-his-place-in-evolving-nba-on-eve-of-11th-season

    Thanks for posting. Interesting stuff. Lebron has done some stupid shit in his time in the league but he really does seem like a good guy most of the time. Looking around at how so many other child star types turn out it’s pretty crazy how well adjusted he seems.

    As for B/R they really have gotten a lot better in some ways although a brief spin through the comments over there will still give you a pretty decent idea of what type of reader they’re primarily attracting.

  5. Owen

    This was a great post. It’s nice to have a decent summary of some of the recent mistakes. You are right. To win in the NBA it pays to sweat the small stuff. And the Knicks don’t as they demonstrate constantly.

  6. swiftandabundant

    Didn’t even address the biggest one of all. Lin. I see the argument for why letting Lin go was a good thing for The Knicks. But we could have also thrown a team option on to his deal that first year. Or we could have given him a reasonable contract at the start of free agency on day one instead of telling him to go get whatever deal he could (was this in the hopes that no one would really want him?) Or Woodson saying we would match whatever (why was Woodson commenting on a player’s contract situation?) Or Melo and JR making comments about his contract (again what are player’s doing talking about this. NO comment!) Everyone seemed to think that not resigning him was good after his rough start but Lin still has upside and could have been valuable for us especially if we had locked him up to a good contract right away.

  7. chrisk06811

    I think it’s crazy how the value of players changes so rapidly. Remember how thrilled we were that Landry wasn’t part of the Melo trade? Remember how Mosgov had that one good game that boosted his trade value, and he’s sucked ever since? Hindsite is really easy in bball.

    I do think the finding of Lin and Novak gave our front office a bit of an arrogance. Then we followed it with Cope…we can keep finding diamonds in the rough.

    With the picks in the Barg’s deal, I agree it looks like we gave away too much, but there’s no way we led with those picks…we must have been pushed. there must have been more to it.

  8. CN

    First time poster, here. Have been reading for about 2 years and can attribute all of my basketball knowledge to the writers and commenters on this site… thanks guys!

    I agree, I wish we had the amnesty to use on STAT, but how come I never hear anyone mention that our beloved Knicks picked up Billups’ $14.2 million option only to use the amnesty on him 6 months later!! All we had to do was buyout his contract $3.7 million. Am I crazy, or does this not rank up there on the list of boneheaded, short-sighted moves?

  9. chrisk06811

    I think we picked up chauncy so the salaries would work in the melo deal. then amnestied him to sign chandler. at that point, I don’t think we were near considering amnestying amare.

  10. Frank

    if I remember correctly we had to choose to pick up Billups’s option before any of the other moves could be made. We ended up amnestying Billups to get Tyson — and would not have had enough cap room to fit Tyson (at his current salary) even if we had just bought out Chauncey for the 3.7MM — because that 3.7MM still counts against the cap. So it was a big waste of Dolan’s $ but it still led to us being able to steal Tyson from GS.

    And there was no way we were amnestying Amare after the year he had in 2010-11, even if he hurt his back in the playoffs doing a stupid dunk in warmups. Any suggestion that we could/should have done that is revisionist at best. And not that I care one bit about Dolan’s $, but amnestying (ie. giving away) $80+MM (as opposed to $14MM or whatever Chauncey made that year) is a big stretch even for a billionaire owner.

  11. Frank

    Twitter is saying that Melo is saying that he’s going to be the starting PF tomorrow night. My guess is that means either we are going back to the Felton/Prigioni/Shump/Melo/TC lineup, or that MWP is starting in place of Bargnani. In either scenario that makes me feel MUCH better about this year — in that Woodson is not going to box himself into lineups and players that aren’t really playing to potential. The great thing about this team is that there is so much depth (and no all-time greats among the secondary players like Kidd was that are hard to bench) that you wouldn’t be taking a step back at all benching just about anyone not named Melo or Tyson.

  12. Frank

    Well, Woody apparently just said that Iman will start at SG. So it feels pretty certain we’re talking Ray/Iman/Artest/Melo/Chandler. Love it.

  13. lavor postell

    Frank:
    Well, Woody apparently just said that Iman will start at SG. So it feels pretty certain we’re talking Ray/Iman/Artest/Melo/Chandler. Love it.

    I love this as our starting lineup with some combination of JR, STAT/Bargs, Prigs, Udrih and K-Mart coming off the bench. That to me is the best way to mix and match the various parts we have at our disposal.

  14. Brian Cronin

    Yeah, it took him an odd route, but the end result was great. The lineup I was most hoping for, Felton/Shump/Artest/Melo/Chandler.

  15. d-mar

    I like that lineup too, the only issue I see is having Bargs and STAT on the court together as twin matadors.

    Just finished listening to Francesa rave about the Nets and trash the Knicks. It’ll make it that much sweeter if we can win the Atlantic (although he will categorically deny that he ever said the Nets were a better team)

  16. DRed

    d-mar:
    I like that lineup too, the only issue I see is having Bargs and STAT on the court together as twin matadors.

    Just finished listening to Francesa rave about the Nets and trash the Knicks. It’ll make it that much sweeter if we can win the Atlantic (although he will categorically deny that he ever said the Nets were a better team)

    but think of the comedy potential of that duo.

  17. massive

    I don’t like the idea of Melo at the 4 on defense. I hate it. That means people are going to beat him up and he’s going to get injured…again.

    Does anyone think that Artest can bring the intangibles that Kidd did? I think he’s just as savvy of a defender (with more athleticism and ability to stay in front of people) and has a chance to be just as effective from 3 (he just has to shoot open 3s), except I think he’ll keep it up for 82 games because he’s 5-6 years younger. Dare I say MWP will be a better player for us this year than Kidd was last year? I know, blasphemous. For one, there is “positional adjustment” so his contributions on the glass won’t be as noted in his stats. But I think Shump and Metta will be better than any 2-3 combo we had last year.

  18. er

    massive:
    I don’t like the idea of Melo at the 4 on defense. I hate it. That means people are going to beat him up and he’s going to get injured…again.

    i actually think Ron Ron will be guarding the bigger players

  19. lavor postell

    massive:
    I don’t like the idea of Melo at the 4 on defense. I hate it. That means people are going to beat him up and he’s going to get injured…again.

    Does anyone think that Artest can bring the intangibles that Kidd did? I think he’s just as savvy of a defender (with more athleticism and ability to stay in front of people) and has a chance to be just as effective from 3 (he just has to shoot open 3s), except I think he’ll keep it up for 82 games because he’s 5-6 years younger. Dare I say MWP will be a better player for us this year than Kidd was last year? I know, blasphemous. For one, there is “positional adjustment” so his contributions on the glass won’t be as noted in his stats. But I think Shump and Metta will be better than any 2-3 combo we had last year.

    The added benefit of MWP in the starting lineup is that he can allow Melo to defend the 3 at times and also share responsibilities with Shumpert in defending the opposing team’s primary wing scorer and/or ball handler. If he can hit a 34% clip from three I think we’ll be fine in terms of spacing the floor for Melo.

  20. Frank

    massive: I don’t like the idea of Melo at the 4 on defense. I hate it. That means people are going to beat him up and he’s going to get injured…again.

    I don’t think there will be much difference between 3s and 4s in this defense. For the less offensively inclined 4s, you’ll see Melo guarding them. I think you’ll see MWP guarding the Boozers, Wests, etc. of the world. And my guess is that Melo won’t be playing against Garnett since KG likes to rip his arms out of his sockets. Basically we’ll be trying to hide/rest Melo on whoever is less threatening regardless of SF or PF destination.

    d-mar: I like that lineup too, the only issue I see is having Bargs and STAT on the court together as twin matadors.

    But just think how great they would be on offense if this were, like, 2009.

  21. Frank

    whoa WTF just happened here? I’d say it looks cool except the (Quote) buttons fall outside the comment boxes.

  22. JK47

    It’s nice to have a physical defender like Artest around so we can be the ones dishing out the punishment for once instead of always being on the receiving end. He’s a bit of a deterrent. If you want to hit Melo with a cheap shot, you can bet Artest is gonna be looking to return that cheap shot. That’s the kind of player he is and that’s the kind of player I loved on the 90′s Knicks.

  23. Mike Kurylo

    Sorry. I’m supposed to warn the crew before heading to warp speed.

    Figure the old girl needed a facelift. I tried to get the Assassin’s Creed background and decoration that Poasting & Toasting has, but opted for a plain white background instead. ;-)

  24. DRed

    Giving up an established, proven winner of a site design for a flashy, inefficient new toy like this is the kind of short sighted move I’ve come to expect from this website’s glory hunting administration. Clearly Mike K has no idea how to properly value the position of the quote button and doesn’t understand how it’s location contributes to website wins.

  25. Mike Kurylo

    DRed:
    Giving up an established, proven winner of a site design for a flashy, inefficient new toy like this is the kind of short sighted move I’ve come to expect from this website’s glory hunting administration.Clearly Mike K has no idea how to properly value the position of the quote button and doesn’t understand how it’s location contributes to website wins.

    Consider the basketball team that the followers of this site support, I figured this is exactly the kind of move that would resonate with y’all. Don’t make me spend a week writing articles about how Mike Sweetney would statistically be the perfect fit for this team.

  26. alsep73

    I hope this doesn’t turn out to be the Lee Nailon of redesigns: flashy and superficially impressive, but doing nothing to actually make the site better.

  27. DRed

    Mike Kurylo: Consider the basketball team that the followers of this site support, I figured this is exactly the kind of move that would resonate with y’all. Don’t make me spend a week writing articles about how Mike Sweetney would statistically be the perfect fit for this team.

    He’s only 31! There’s got to be something left in the tank.

  28. thenamestsam

    Looks pretty good. I like the new front page look and the look of the article itself especially. The comments I’m more hesitant about. I’m finding the grey line that runs down just to the the right side of the comment boxes quite distracting, ditto the hard black line around alternating comments.

  29. Mike Kurylo

    alsep73:
    I hope this doesn’t turn out to be the Lee Nailon of redesigns: flashy and superficially impressive, but doing nothing to actually make the site better.

    I’ll take Lee Nailon over Eddy Curry – bloated, slow, and by the end hated by all.

  30. Mike Kurylo

    thenamestsam:
    Looks pretty good. I like the new front page look and the look of the article itself especially. The comments I’m more hesitant about. I’m finding the grey line that runs down just to the the right side of the comment boxes quite distracting, ditto the hard black line around alternating comments.

    That grey line can’t really go away. I can fill the heck out of the right side with adverts if you wish. ;-)

    I went through more revisions on the comments than anything else. There were really bad out of the box.

    As for Lee Nailon, I did a bunch of stuff on the backend. One was deleting about 200,000 spam users. Another was disabling about half a dozen plugins (which slowed the site down). There’s also supposed to be a way to edit your own comments, but that doesn’t seem to be working properly at the moment. (worked in dev…)

  31. KnickfaninNJ

    marxster:
    Anyone finding this font difficult to read?

    Yes, I am and was about to post the same. It’s weird, the font is actually much bigger on my screen, but much harder to read than the old one. So far, the new look is very hard to deal with for me. It does look more modern, but that’s stylistic, not functional

  32. marxster

    KnickfaninNJ: Yes, I am and was about to post the same.It’s weird, the font is actually much bigger on my screen, but much harder to read than the old one. So far, the new look is very hard to deal with for me. It does look more modern, but that’s stylistic, not functional

    Glad it’s not just me.

  33. Brian Cronin

    For what it’s worth, though, I think the Copeland move was more than defensible. Player options automatically vest if you cut them and therefore affect the cap, so if you want to have room to cut a guy to sign someone else (something we knew that the Knicks definitely were going to do at some point during the season as players like K-Mart were going to become available later on) then you need to have guys that you can cut without incident. Copeland seemed to be that guy. As it turned out, Kurt Thomas and Sheed were those two guys, but we didn’t know that at the time, so I think it was fair enough not to give Copeland a second-year option.

    Prigs, though, should have gotten a second-year option as he was more of a proven commodity. However, again, in that instance Prigs actually specifically refused the Knicks’ attempts to get him to take a second-year option.

  34. Mike Kurylo

    KnickfaninNJ: Yes, I am and was about to post the same.It’s weird, the font is actually much bigger on my screen, but much harder to read than the old one. So far, the new look is very hard to deal with for me. It does look more modern, but that’s stylistic, not functional

    Are the comments better now?

  35. KnickfaninNJ

    Mike Kurylo: Are the comments better now?

    Actually yes, but I can’t tell what you did. (I’m curious, what did you do?) Now the readability may be close to the old readability; I’m not totally sure but it’s definitely better. The font still seems slightly bigger and the line spacing also, so I get the visual impression of less content on a page view, but I don’t know if I am seeing that right.

  36. Mike Kurylo

    KnickfaninNJ: Actually yes, but I can’t tell what you did. (I’m curious, what did you do?)Now the readability may be close to the old readability; I’m not totally sure but it’s definitely better. The font still seems slightly bigger and the line spacing also, so I get the visual impression of less content on a page view, but I don’t know if I am seeing that right.

    Changed the font.

  37. thenamestsam

    New font is definitely much better. Also think there may be too much blank space in each comment box which is contributing to the feeling of few comments per page. Is there anyway to put the picture, comment #, name and timestamp on a single horizontal line? And shrink some of the autospacing between comments? There’s a ton of white space at the moment.

  38. thenamestsam

    Oh and many thanks for attempting to include an edit button. Once that’s working it’ll be a big improvement.

  39. Mike Kurylo

    thenamestsam: New font is definitely much better. Also think there may be too much blank space in each comment box which is contributing to the feeling of few comments per page. Is there anyway to put the picture, comment #, name and timestamp on a single horizontal line? And shrink some of the autospacing between comments? There’s a ton of white space at the moment.

    The auto spacing is due to the quote button. The plugin that does that sticks it in. I actually made it less (believe it or not). Will work on it more. Making a list…

  40. ephus

    Brian Cronin: For what it’s worth, though, I think the Copeland move was more than defensible. Player options automatically vest if you cut them and therefore affect the cap, so if you want to have room to cut a guy to sign someone else (something we knew that the Knicks definitely were going to do at some point during the season as players like K-Mart were going to become available later on) then you need to have guys that you can cut without incident. Copeland seemed to be that guy. As it turned out, Kurt Thomas and Sheed were those two guys, but we didn’t know that at the time, so I think it was fair enough not to give Copeland a second-year option.

    Brian – I think that you go 180 degrees in the wrong direction here. The article is suggesting that Copeland’s contract should have had a team option for a second year, not a player option. It’s my understanding that while a player option year counts against the salary cap if the player is cut, a team option (a non-guaranteed year) does not. http://www.cbafaq.com/salarycap.htm#Q65

  41. marxster

    Hey Mike,

    Since you’re in troubleshooting mode, the site loads very slowly for me, not sure if everyone else has that issue.

  42. Kevin Udwary

    DRed:
    Giving up an established, proven winner of a site design for a flashy, inefficient new toy like this is the kind of short sighted move I’ve come to expect from this website’s glory hunting administration.Clearly Mike K has no idea how to properly value the position of the quote button and doesn’t understand how it’s location contributes to website wins.

    But the CPP (Comments Per Post) of this new design are off the charts so far! Sure, the usage is still low, but high efficiency of comments on low usage is still beneficial!

  43. Brian Cronin

    Brian – I think that you go 180 degrees in the wrong direction here. The article is suggesting that Copeland’s contract should have had a team option for a second year, not a player option. It’s my understanding that while a player option year counts against the salary cap if the player is cut, a team option (a non-guaranteed year) does not. http://www.cbafaq.com/salarycap.htm#Q65

    Oh, team options don’t vest? Then yeah, that was moronic of the Knicks. But if team options don’t vest, then why in the world would any team not sign players to one year deals with team options for a second year? If there is no possible downside and only upside, then why wouldn’t every team do it with end of the roster players? There must be some reason why every deal isn’t that, no?

  44. mokers

    As somebody who has spent a lot of time designing websites, I know the backend stuff is about zero fun with less than zero recognition. Thanks for the hard work.

    Spacing still seems a little off for the main article text. Hard to read in my browser (chrome). Comment text is much easier to read.

    (my first edit!) – Also for the byline, how about Knicks, Humor, Sound Statistical Analysis? Putting Knicks last to me sounds like that is an afterthought of the blog.

  45. Frank

    hi – seconding the too much white space. also the comments are not centered (vertically) in the comment box which feels unbalanced. and the (quote) button is still outside the comment box, at least on my browser (newest Safari). And the avatars, comment numbers, and date are indented – not sure if that was meant to be that way.

    but yes – while I liked the old website, I appreciate all the hard work that goes into switching it up.

  46. ephus

    Brian Cronin: But if team options don’t vest, then why in the world would any team not sign players to one year deals with team options for a second year? If there is no possible downside and only upside, then why wouldn’t every team do it with end of the roster players? There must be some reason why every deal isn’t that, no?

    Yes. The only good reason for a team not to include a second year at the team’s option (or a second non-guaranteed year at the minimum) is that the player has enough bargaining power to resist that demand. I do not think that Copeland was in that category last year.

  47. dtrickey

    A few points:

    First: Love the new look. Amazing what a lick of paint can do.

    Second: I think the point might have been raised earlier, but hindsight really is 20/20. The point about the team option is valid as a “just in case he’s awseome and captivates the hearts and minds of Knicks fans” fallback, however see point 3.

    Third: I get the point of “every piece is important” that the article raises (can’t really fault too much with what it submits), however fact is that even though they are end of the bench journeymen, bench warmers are pro-basketballers, so given an opportunity I think you would find a lot would produce respectable numbers given the right opportunity. I think it’s important to find guys in those 13th, 14th and 15th man spots that can produce and that are going to fit a need, but how many players did we see in summer camp nearly make the cut simply on the fact that they filled a need? Savy scouting and research is important finding these guys (and I generally think we have done well getting end of the bench guys the last few years), but I think sometimes we get a little hung up on the benchwarmers, when they are really a dime a dozen. Maybe we are just suckers for a journeyman making it big in the apple?

  48. mokers

    Re, the article. I think it is well-written, but it still takes some things for granted without explaining your reasoning. For as smart as Ujiri is, his teams have never left the first round. The most important decision for OKC’s sustained success was made when the Trailblazers picked Greg Oden. I’m not trying to defend the way the Knicks are doing things, but I do think proximity to the Knicks is clouding what we think of as paying attention to the small things and their importance in overall success.

    As I have said before, even with all the dumb moves going on in the back office, the product on the court is so much more enjoyable than even 5 years ago. The only wholesale change in philosophy is going to come when there is an ownership change. While MSG network is still making money, I don’t see that happening. So while it doesn’t seem like much of a goal, I am happy with a front office that may not be genius but is at least getting less dumb each year, however incrementally. In order to evaluate that, you must base things on results and the results on the court really aren’t that terrible. If the knicks go on to win 39 games, I will change my evaluation, but if the knicks go on to win 50 games again, I would hope some of the people here would change theirs as well.

  49. Jack Bauer

    Great points, agree on all. That list of overpaying on past trades was very painful to relive. I was hoping that Mills was hired for a good reason, but obviously not – business as usual in DolanWorld. I am a lifelong Knicks fan, but the degree of difficulty of staying behind the team is being raised to never before seen heights.

  50. jackitup

    We win 54 if we stay healthy, or at least get injured at the same rate as the rest of the division. Life is so much better without Lin, gallinari, and d’antoni — all over-rated by knick fans who just wanted to believe in a post-zeke apacolypse world….

    Predictions:

    Nets are bound to have more injury issues than Knicks. Detroit will be nettlesome for our guys. Pacers go backwards for a streak…. Haim nicks gets traded to the 49ers….oops, wrong squad….

  51. Z-man

    Owen:
    What happened to Jon? He decide to go full time at occupy msg?

    Banned for going over the top in criticizing the authors here.

  52. Keniman Shumpwalker

    DRed…you beat me to it. That’s EXACTLY what I was going to say. It really is amazing that he was considered lottery talent, at the time. And, while we were the ones to pull the trigger, we weren’t alone in thinking that there was a productive NBA basketball player in there, one worthy of a high-1st round pick. He’s like the homeless man’s DeJuan Blair.

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