Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Content Tagged "Mike Sweetney"

Knicks 35 Bulls 117

Random Notes & Thoughts: * I’ve come up with a new game to play during Knick games, I call it the Jared Jeffries game. Anytime an announcer says Jeffries stats, add the words “a career high” after it. It works well when they say things like “Jeffries has 5 points on the night” or “That’s Jeffries 3rd rebound.” It helps take the pain away when Jeffries misses from inside the paint. * The Knicks normally have been good in third quarters, which had us guessing what Isiah does at halftimes. So far the most prevalent notion is “live cock fights.” …continue reading

Diagnosing Patient Frye: What Ails Our Sophomore Slumper?

Healthy, Wealthy, and Young: The Birth of A New Era Standing 6?11?, being only 23 years-old, and with a promising rookie campaign under his belt, Channing Frye seemed destined to finally fill the gaping productivity hole at the Knicks? power forward position. The Knicks haven?t employed a tall, talented four since the glory days of Charles Oakley. Having suffered through a platoon of the short (Anthony Mason, Larry Johnson), the short and useless (Othella Harrington, Clarence Weatherspoon, Malik Rose, Maurice Taylor), and the short but perennially out of shape (Mike Sweetney), Knicks fans envisioned a bright future of crisp pick-and-rolls, …continue reading

Michael Sweetney: Big Mike’s Numbers and the Analysts Who Love Them

The foundation of the statistical analysis revolution in sports is the fact that subjective impressions are not sufficient measures of a player performance. Objective measurements, usually in the form of statistics, are needed to properly determine value. Using too much subjective impression will either overvalue or undervalue a player. By the basis of their objectivity, statistical analysts (statheads) are supposed to be immune to the rank subjective posturing that afflicts most general managers and sports writers. That statheads are impartial observers is itself a hypothesis, which like all scientific hypotheses must be tested against the evidence. For that end, let …continue reading