Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Content Tagged "Dean Oliver"

Gnate and Nate?

My writing this week hasn’t been shedding Isiah Thomas’ latest move in a positive light. However one day after the draft would be a foolish time to continue to rain on the Knicks. Just one day after the draft Channing Frye is a future All Star, Nate Robinson is the backup PG that is better than half the starters in the league, and David Lee is going walk right in & fill Kurt Thomas’ shoes. In fact despite railing on the deal just a few days ago, I was pretty excited when I heard that the Kurt Thomas trade was …continue reading

This Is Not a Stats Primer

Recently I’ve noticed an influx of new readers to my little corner of the blogosphere. To my new audience I say “Hi mom & dad, sorry for changing your browser start-up page.” Since the basketball stat community is new on the scene, a lot of the numbers I use here are still unknown to the general public. Unless you’ve been here for a while, or you’re already an insider on the APBRmetric scene, you might not be comfortable with all the terms on KB.Net. This is where you expect me to do a whole big write-up on the stats I …continue reading

Steve Nash for MVP? (Part II)

[This is Part II of a two-part column by KnickerBlogger Head West Coast Analyst Kevin Pelton analyzing Steve Nash's season and MVP chances. Please read Part I if you haven't already by scrolling down or clicking here. Kevin serves as the Sonics and Storm beat writer for SUPERSONICS.COM and storm.wnba.com. He formerly wrote the APBRmetric "Page 23" column for Hoopsworld.com.] I left off Monday by drawing the conclusion that Steve Nash’s 2004-05 season is statistically very similar to John Stockton’s prime years. Based on that, it may be illuminating to look at Stockton’s MVP performance. The short-shorted one peaked in …continue reading

John Hollinger to Join ESPN!

If they keep this up, ESPN is going to have to change their name to ESPMN. The “M” would stand for Moneyball, for the controversial book that chronicled the stat-centric Oakland Athletics front office. Today Moneyball is synonymous with any type of sports statistical analysis. For years Rob Neyer has been the main attraction of ESPN’s statistical writers. The former Bill James assistant is sabermetrics’ most popular author, bringing objective analysis of baseball to a main stream audience on a regular basis. Already having baseball’s best number-crunching author, ESPN is building a Moneyball monopoly by signing Neyer’s basketball’s equivalent. It …continue reading