10 Greatest Knick All-Star Moments: #8

As you may know, on Sunday February 20th Amar’e Stoudemire will become the first Knick to start in the NBA All-Star Game since Patrick Ewing did so in 1992. In honor of this momentous occasion, I decided to take a look back at the ten greatest moments in Knicks All-Star history, including a couple great moments from the larger All-Star Weekend. Some of these come from the recent past, while others date back to a time before I, and perhaps some of you, were alive. What all these moments have in common is that they show that Knicks players know how to step up for the Midseason Classic.

8. Nate Robinson’s First Dunk Contest Victory (2006)

This, the first of Nate Robinson’s three Dunk Contest victories, was rather controversial. If you will remember, Andre Iguodala delivered two dunks with perfect scores of 50 in the first two rounds. The five-foot-nine Robinson memorably forced a “Dunk Off” tiebreaker by matching Iguodala’s perfect score in Round 2 after receiving a vertical bounce from and leaping over little-guy predecessor Spud Webb. In the Dunk-Off, Iguodala easily completed a between-the-legs reverse with plenty of hang time, to the tune of a 46 from the judges. Robinson, after 16 failed attempts, finally completed a wacky circus jam that started with him jumping up at the three-point line, juggling the ball between both legs, one at a time, and while still in midair, tossing the ball of the backboard and catching it to deliver a strong one-hander. His 47 points were enough to best Iguodala, a fact which at least 207 people are still very upset about. Robinson would go on to win two more Dunk Contests, becoming the first ever three-time champion.

10 Greatest Knick All-Star Moments: #9

As you may know, on Sunday February 20th Amar’e Stoudemire will become the first Knick to start in the NBA All-Star Game since Patrick Ewing did so in 1992. In honor of this momentous occasion, I decided to take a look back at the ten greatest moments in Knicks All-Star history, including a couple great moments from the larger All-Star Weekend. Some of these come from the recent past, while others date back to a time before I, and perhaps some of you, were alive. What all these moments have in common is that they show that Knicks players know how to step up for the Midseason Classic.

9. Patrick Ewing Throws a Block Party (1990)

In an All-Star Game filled with legends–Jordan, Isiah, Bird, Barkley, Magic, and Hakeem, just to name a few–Ewing managed to stand out as a defensive presence for the East, racking up five assertive blocks to go along with his 12 points and ten rebounds. Although Olajuwon would go on to taste greater glory when the Rockets defeated the Knicks in the 1994 Finals, for this one marvelous evening, Patrick made it known that he–not Hakeem or David Robinson–was the most dominant big man on the court. Check out a very no-nonsense rejection of Robinson at 7:18 in the above video, which features plenty of other amazing plays from a very entertaining game.

10 Greatest Knick All-Star Moments: #10

As you may know, on Sunday February 20th Amar’e Stoudemire will become the first Knick to start in the NBA All-Star Game since Patrick Ewing did so in 1992. In honor of this momentous occasion, I decided to take a look back at the ten greatest moments in Knicks All-Star history, including a couple great moments from the larger All-Star Weekend. Some of these come from the recent past, while others date back to a time before I, and perhaps some of you, were alive. What all these moments have in common is that they show that Knicks players know how to step up for the Midseason Classic.

10. Richie Guerin Serves as Wilt’s Lieutenant (1962)

Although his East teammate Wilt Chamberlain stole the show in the 1962 game by scoring 42 points and grabbing 24 rebounds, Knicks guard Richie Guerin had an impressive showing as the squad’s second fiddle, dropping 23 points on 10-for-17 shooting in 27 minutes. This was the fifth of six All-Star appearances for Guerin, a Bronx native and fan favorite, and though he and Chamberlain made for an impressive duo, they couldn’t match a powerful West team led by Oscar Robertson, Bob Pettit, and Elgin Baylor. The East fell 150-130.