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Friday, July 25, 2014

Mid Season Youngins Report

With 41 games in the books, I thought I’d check in on the youngins and see how they’re doing.

Wilson Chandler’s stats are quite similar to last year’s with a few worthwhile exceptions. Before the start of the season I said Chandler would have to increase either his free throw attempts or three point shooting percentage to be a successful NBA player. Unfortunately Wilson has regressed in both areas (FTA/36 2.8 to 2.2, 3p% 32.8% to 27.2%). These stats are important for his development because Chandler settled for the three pointer too often and didn’t connect often enough from downtown. Instead Chandler has reduced the number of three pointers attempted (3PA/36 4.1 to 2.6) and consequently his TS% has risen to 52.5%, good enough to be his best season. Chandler has given up chucking threes to taking the action to the hoop. NBA hotspots shows Chandler taking a high percentage of his shots from the paint (234 of 536 FG attempts). Granted he isn’t drawing contact and getting to the charity stripe, but this is a shift in the right direction for the 22 year old.

Limited to being a three point specialist in his first season, Danilo Gallinari has shown his athleticism in his sophomore campaign. Gallo has improved his free throws (2.4 to 3.5 fta/36), rebounding (4.8 to 5.5 reb/36), blocked shots (0.3 to 1.0 blk/36), personal fouls (4.2 to 2.4 pf/36) and points scored (14.9 to 16.7 pts/36). Overall he’s improved in multiple areas, which is exactly what you’d want from an underaged #6 pick.

Neither player in the Knicks draft class of 2009 has made an impact. Toney Douglas is 9th in minutes on the team and Hill is 11th, which in D’Antoni’s rotation means neither is playing consistently. At the start of the season, it seemed as if Toney Douglas would be in the rotation and Jordan Hill would be on the outside looking in. There was even rumors of Hill being sent to the D-League to see some action. But recently Hill has crept into the end of the Knicks rotation, and Douglas has seen his minutes reduced. To the eye Douglas has been quick on the defensive end, but he’s lost the play making ability that he flashed in the preseason. Meanwhile Hill has shown his athleticism on both ends of the floor, but he’s settling for long jumpers too often for a F/C. Finally Marcus Landry has been limited strictly to garbage time (72 minutes played on the year).

Of the five, Danilo Gallinari is the only one that’s given the inkling of becoming a future All Star. Down the stretch it’s important to see if Gallo can take a bigger role in the offense and not defer to his teammates. Chandler has improved, but he still need to produce more to be an above average NBA starter. As the season progresses we should monitor Chandler’s efficiency. For Douglas, Hill, and Landry, it’d be good for them to get significant court time, but the Knicks pursuit of a playoff spot could hamper such an opportunity.

63 comments on “Mid Season Youngins Report

  1. Mike Kurylo Post author

    Yahoo reporting the Knicks/Celts have talked about Nate Robinson. Problem is there really isn’t a good match for the teams. Eddie House? Tony Allen? Neither of them really excite me. Although a future draft pick might be a good idea considering the team’s age. Of course giving up a good player like Robinson to a divisional opponent doesn’t thrill me either.

  2. ess-dog

    Allen, House and Scalabrine for Nate and Jeffries works. Of course we’d have to immediately cut Scalabrine. I’m not sure they let vets Allen and House go, even though talent wise, it’s clearly a better deal for the Celts. And I’d hate to see Nate doing his thing against us. But Nate is most likely gone next year anyway, and doing this trade means we’d get to keep Lee.

  3. Mike Kurylo Post author

    ess-dog I’d like to see a draft pick in that mix. I’m not sure giving Nate to a division rival just to unload Jeffries for cap relief is worth it. New York could probably make that deal with a few teams around the league.

  4. Brian Cronin

    I dunno, Mike, I don’t know if Nate has enough trade value around the league that many teams would take Jeffries with Nate and give the Knicks back expirings. In fact, I don’t think that’s even what Boston is willing to do (they seem to only want Nate). I think if that deal (Nate plus Jeffries for expirings) ever becomes available, they would take it no matter who the team is.

    If the deal was just Nate, by the way, I could see him accepting a deal to Boston, as there’s a decent chance that they’d re-sign him.

  5. jaddddd1

    Why would the Cs give us Ray Allen for Nate? Jesus Shuttlesworth is already a better player. And to take Jeffries too? They already have a couple of guys who can D up but don’t provie much at the other end (Tony Allen example).

  6. ess-dog

    Even though he’s improving and younger than Nate (and likeable), it seems to make more sense to part with Wilson over Nate just based on the numbers. Nate’s always had a better eFG and PER. I know Nate has “issues” but I can’t help but think he’s a better asset than Chandler.

  7. Brian Cronin

    I’d trade Chandler in a heartbeat if it meant clearing Jeffries off of the cap.

    I’d rather make Hill the sweetener instead of Chandler, but either guy I think is fungible in the right deal (i.e. Jeffries being moved).

    As far as trade value of the Knick “sweetners” (guys you could package to get a team to take Jeffries’ 2010 salary) goes, I’d rank them:

    Gallo
    HUGE GAP
    Chandler
    Hill
    GAP
    Nate

  8. Nick C.

    w/o Nate is there a guard on the roster that it could be argued is league average (unless or even if you include Chandler as a guard)?

    To get to the topic at hand it is good to see Chandler is receptive to learning, since Coach D has said more than once in so many words they talk to him about shot selection.

  9. jaddddd1

    ess-dog, my mistake.

    ESPNs Chad Ford and Bill Simmons seem to think we need to trade Gallo to clear off Jeffries and/or Curry. They don’t seem to realize that both Mike D and Donnie love Gallo and it’ll never happen. Hill/Chandler/Douglas are much more likely to be included in a trade as “sweeteners.”

  10. Brian Cronin

    Yeah, that was another one of the bits from that chat that irritated me. Ford seemed to understand that the Knicks were not going to trade Gallo – he just didn’t do a very good job correcting Simmons.

    If I were to include Douglas on the “sweeteners” list, I’d have him as a “huge gap” beneath Nate. I don’t think he has much trade value at all.

  11. Z

    “I don’t know if Nate has enough trade value around the league that many teams would take Jeffries with Nate and give the Knicks back expirings.”

    Is Kenny Thomas still available?

    “I’d trade Chandler in a heartbeat if it meant clearing Jeffries off of the cap.”

    Agreed. But before we get hung up on sweetening deals for Jeffries, our other albatross is making some interesting statements:

    In yesterday’s Post Berman wrote: “Curry is expected to seek a buyout this summer” adding that “Curry said after his recent demotion that if he didn’t get back playing, they should part ways in the off season.”

    Presumably Berman is paraphrasing a direct quote from Curry. If so, why the heck is Curry talking about a buyout before an option year? If he wants to part ways, he can just opt out, as the contract allows. If he exercises his option, why the heck would the Knicks then buy him out? They would HAVE to hold onto his contract until February 2011 or they would be completely negligent.

    Seems to me that if Berman’s reporting is correct (great big IF) and Curry really is talking “buyout” already, then the Knicks may be able to work out a severance agreement after THIS trade deadline, assuming Curry is willing to accept a $5.5 million buyout of his $11 million salary next season. The buyout language in the CBA is difficult to navigate, but it appears options can be bought out at 50% of their value(*). I know that’s why Jerome James lasted as long as he did, but Eddy seems pretty desperate to get out of NY (and his short run cash-flow issues are well documented).

    Could Curry prematurely talking buyout possibly shed light on this cryptic statement of Walsh’s from last July: “I have a little leeway that will leave me in good position for next year,” Walsh told the Associated Press. “I know what it is, but do not talk much about it.”

    Just thinking out loud…

    (* the Salary Cap FAQ states: “when a contract contains an option year, a buyout amount for the option year can be written into the contract. The buyout amount may be up to 50% of the salary for the option year, and is payable with the exercise of an ETO or the non-exercise of an option.”)

  12. mase

    nate and jj= no playoffs.

    dumb question, who can we sign with that cap room, i dont see Lebron leaving Ohio?

    dum question #2: how can curry extendend his contract if he hasnt played in 2 seasons and is now undergoing knee surgery ?

  13. Brian Cronin

    Yeah, Z, you are correct in noting that the Knicks can buy out Curry’s next year at 50%. So sure, the Knicks do have the flexibility to cut $5.5 million off next year’s cap. If they traded Jeffries and got that $5.5 million relief, then wow, that’d be an extra $12.5 million.

    Perhaps I should put up a post explaining Curry’s contract and the Knicks’ options with him.

  14. jaddddd1

    Doesn’t Curry’s full contract, even with a buyout, stay on the cap no matter what? That’s why teams like the Mavs who had Dampier for a bagillion dollar contract couldn’t just buy him out and cut his number off the cap, and that’s why we kept Marbury until the last minute last year. If so, there’s no reason to buy out Curry before the trade deadline next year, because his contract is an asset as an expiring next year, just like Marbury’s was last year.

  15. TheRant

    If Boston will elect a Republican, will they also give us Garnett and Rondo for Curry and Nate? What if we say please?

  16. Kevin McElroy

    Biggest issue with a nate trade seems to be that he’s a base-year compensation player which, for the uninitiated, means that he counts for a shade over two million coming off the Knicks cap while counting for his full 4 million dollar salary going onto boston’s cap…so there’s no way to match him one for one, as a player int he 2 million dollar range would not be enough for the celtics to give up to be allowed to take nate, and a player in the 4 million dollar range would be too high for the Knicks to accept for nate under the cap. This leaves two options:

    1) Include nate as part of a larger trade (since you can make trades with a 25% difference in payroll, adding more money makes the 2 million dollar gap between his base number and his current salary less of a big deal — thats why essdog’s Jeffries trade works)

    2) Get a third team that has cap room involved to take two million dollars in salary from the celtics so that the celtics give up the same cap number that they receive while only giving the knicks the 2 million to match what comes off their cap for nate. The list of teams with that much cap room is very short: basically Memphis and (maybe) Portland.

    Although this all seems more interesting as a thought experiment on cap-ology than as a reality, as it doesn’t look like the Celtics are going to meet the Knicks asking price. Oh well, if we’re not gonna get money off of the cap I’d obviously much rather watch Nate than Eddie House for the rest of the year.

  17. nicos

    In fairness to Wil, he’s really had two different seasons- October/November where he was terribly inefficient and December/January where he’s been pretty good by whatever metric you want to use. Which is the real Wil? I’d like to think his recent play (Toronto and OKC games notwithstanding) is sustainable at least enough so that I’d be hesitant to use him solely as a chip to unload Jeffries’ salary (I’d at least want a draft pick included or something of real use this season to make that kind of deal).

    On Curry: If I’m understanding this correctly we can buy him out after the season and he’ll only count for 5.5 mil on our 2010/11 cap. Does that 5.5 mil of immediate cap room in the summer outweigh his value as 11 mil in expiring money that can be packaged with someone like Chandler (another reason why I’m reluctant to dump him now) to pick up a quality player who’s not on the free agent market?

  18. Jafa

    Nicos, great question. If you look at it from the lens of getting LBJ:

    If you get immediate cap relief of 5.5 Mil, would that be enough to sign LBJ and another max FA? What about just LBJ and another quality teammate (good chance quality players that are not max players would be willing to join LBJ in NY)?

    If you hold onto Curry and now have an $11 Mil expiring contract to float, most teams would probably wait until closer to the trade deadline to talk to you since Curry has no value as a player (nobody wants to shoulder the load of paying that salary until they have to). Would LBJ buy into that, carrying the team for 4 months before you can get him quality help? How would that team be different from what he had in Cleveland?

    Thats how I analyze that question.

  19. Brian Cronin

    Doesn’t Curry’s full contract, even with a buyout, stay on the cap no matter what? That’s why teams like the Mavs who had Dampier for a bagillion dollar contract couldn’t just buy him out and cut his number off the cap, and that’s why we kept Marbury until the last minute last year. If so, there’s no reason to buy out Curry before the trade deadline next year, because his contract is an asset as an expiring next year, just like Marbury’s was last year.

    When you’re in the last year of the player’s contract, with just the one option year left (like Curry), you can buy out the option year with only 50% of the option year counting against your cap.

    Dampier is a weird case because his option year is based on performance (if he plays 2100 minutes, the last year of the contract vests), so I presume it is not treated the same way as a player option like Curry.

    And Marbury’s contract was guaranteed, not a player option.

  20. Brian Cronin

    On Curry: If I’m understanding this correctly we can buy him out after the season and he’ll only count for 5.5 mil on our 2010/11 cap. Does that 5.5 mil of immediate cap room in the summer outweigh his value as 11 mil in expiring money that can be packaged with someone like Chandler (another reason why I’m reluctant to dump him now) to pick up a quality player who’s not on the free agent market?

    Correct, although I’m a bit iffy on the timing. I think it might have to be done this season for the Knicks to be able to buy out the option year at 50%. But that’s likely when it would happen anyways – as soon as the trade deadline passes.

    As for whether you’d prefer to have $5.5 million off the cap for this summer or an $11 million expiring contract next summer, well, that’s why Donnie Walsh is paid the big bucks, to determine which is better for the Knicks.

  21. Z

    My reading of the salary cap FAQ is basically that Curry can opt out at the end of this year and be paid $5.5 million for it. I’m not sure why the $5.5 million would count against next years cap, since a buyout is only applied to the cap for the length of the original contract, which theoretically expires the moment Curry opts out.

    This is all highly conceptual, since it is so rare that a player would ever opt out of a contract when he isn’t likely to sign a second contract for more money, but Eddy Curry seems like such a rare case that such a scenario seems remotely possible. (It is all moot, though, if Curry decides to opt in and ride the Knicks’ stationary bikes for a year, a la Jerome James. He’ll be paid the full $11 mil, and not settle for 50%– the price of his freedom).

  22. Brian Cronin

    The $5.5 million is only if the Knicks buy out Curry, not if opts out.

    If he opts out, he doesn’t get anything.

    The 50% thing is only because the Collective Bargaining Agreement has a specific rule for situations like this one.

    An interesting question is – would the NBA even let Curry opt out? It would make such little sense for him to do it that if he did do it, you would have to think that the NBA would presume something fishy was going on, right?

  23. Z

    “An interesting question is – would the NBA even let Curry opt out? It would make such little sense for him to do it that if he did do it, you would have to think that the NBA would presume something fishy was going on, right?”

    Maybe it’s been his life long dream to play in Europe and he simply can’t wait another year!

    Seriously, though, player options are for players to get out of situations they don’t like. He’s already floating the idea of divorce, citing irreconcilable differences with the Knicks. I can’t see how the league can force him to stay in a situation that he truly wants out of. (That’s the Player’s Union’s job!).

  24. Brian Cronin

    More David Lee jerseys sold last year than Kevin Durant.

    Hilarious.

    Lee was #13 overall, by the way.

  25. tastycakes

    New York is home to a few more people than Oklahoma City. :)

    God, I hate these 3 day breaks between games. Bring on the Lakers!

    Enjoying the Australian Open though.

  26. Brian Cronin

    So I’m thinking the Knicks are not going to be catching the Bobcats any time soon.

    Also, the timing on these other teams playing the shorthanded Celtics sure is irritating!

  27. d-mar

    “So I’m thinking the Knicks are not going to be catching the Bobcats any time soon”

    .Yeah, but the Bulls keep losing out West, and who knows, the Heat could start to free fall.

    The Brandon Jennings hype machine seems to have come to a grinding halt. Maybe it’s because of games like last night (5-21) and the fact that his shooting has dropped to 38%.

  28. J Weezy

    i feel like brandon jennings would sit less minutes on the knicks than the he is on the bucks due to his low shooting percentage and the fact the Coach D is known for suddenly taking ppl in/out of the rotation

  29. Ted Nelson

    Excellent article on the young guys, Mike. It’s natural to be too high on your own team’s prospects, but I really like that group. It’s good to see that Hill is getting some minutes that he’s hopefully earned through hard work.

    Hadn’t heard of the 50% buyout thing… Seems like a no-brainer. I really don’t think Curry will opt out.

    No idea if they’re interested–haven’t even followed the rumors–but the Celtics are one team that might be able to use Jeffries. Seems like you either need a capped out contender that can hide his weaknesses or an underachieving team that wants to improve defensively. Another route could be to bring back one or more non-expiring contracts for Jeffries that you could then move for expiring(s).

  30. BigBlueAL

    Great, the Lakers lost tonight with Lebron outplaying Kobe down the stretch. That means Kobe is going to be fuckin pissed off tomorrow night vs the Knicks. Could be another 61 for Kobe in MSG….

  31. Manh George

    How can anyone discuss Chandler’s season without noting that:

    1) He played much of last year with 2 bone spurs in his ankle;

    2) He had surgery right after the season and missed the entire summer;

    3) He didn’t get his legs back until December; and

    4) Even then, he was still hurting to a degree from the surgery. He had a cortisone shot around late December.

    So, OF COURSE his stats were crap the first two months. Of course the Chandler you see now is closer to his true potential, and of course, as a 22 year old, he will continue to improve. I’m betting tyhat he even develops a 3-point shot eventually; he has a shooting touch, being the best FT shooter on the team. He’s a lot more valuable as a team resource or in a trade than most here seem to be giving him credit for being, because full-season stats don’t measure his potentail as a healthy, in-condition athlete.

    Btw, Hill now appears to be a semi-permanent part of the rotation. There is enough of the season left to get a better handle on his potential.

  32. Mulligan

    Can we go back to the idea of buying out Curry’s contract after he opts in? If that saves 5.5 mil, that means we just need to trim another 1.5 mi from somewhere right? That’s pretty awesome since it gives us a little flexibility with trading Jeffries, since it means we could take back a combination of a small expiring contract and maybe a smaller (1-4ish per year) contract that continues into 2010. That’s awesome right? I mean, that’s way more flexibility. This is blowing my mind!

  33. Brian Cronin

    It would involve Curry walking away from $5.5 million, though, which is a major sticking point.

    Since they could settle for anything over 50%, as well, you’d have to think that he would push for more money, and less cap relief for the Knicks.

  34. Mulligan

    Oh, somehow I interpreted it to mean that even if they bought him out for the full amount, only half of it would count against the cap. That’s what blew my mind.

    If it’s just that they’re allowed to buy him out for 50% of his last year, that’s not as exciting.

  35. jaddddd1

    If Curry is in fact bought out, can the Knicks even use that money this summer? Or does it not come off the cap til after the 10-11 season?

  36. Brian Cronin

    Oh, somehow I interpreted it to mean that even if they bought him out for the full amount, only half of it would count against the cap. That’s what blew my mind.

    If it’s just that they’re allowed to buy him out for 50% of his last year, that’s not as exciting.

    It really comes down to how much Curry really wants to move on. If he is serious about it, then losing $5.5 million is not insanely unreasonable.

    But yeah, odds are he would ask for more, so it’s not as exciting.

    And jaddddd1, the money would be available right away (well, depending on when they did it, but presumably it would be before the season ended).

  37. Brian Cronin

    I asked Chad Ford for his take on it on his twitter, but the space limits made my question kind of lame, really (I made it sound like Curry was willing to agree to $5.5 million).

  38. DS

    Re: The All-Star Game; Does DLee make it??

    I def. think Granger, Bosh, Gerald Wallace, Joe Johnson, and at least 1-2 other guys from the Celtics, Cavs, or Hawks get in ahead of Lee. Jamison may have a good case. Perhaps Derrick Rose (if Rondo doesn’t get in) just for the sake of having 1 true PG on the entire roster.

    AI and KG who were named as ASG starters yesterday prob. would not have been selected as reserves. That means two guys who have better numbers than them will be taking 2 of the 7 reserve spots. Is there still a requirement to pick 1 reserve who is listed at center???

    Re: Curry. If you were his agent, would you let him agree to a buyout for much less than his current contract?

  39. david

    As each opponent provides an opportunity to propose a trade that won’t get accepted, how about Nate and Jeffries for Morrison and Fischer (who we agree to cut and give back). Alternative, less good for us version, Nate and Jeffries for Morrison and Sasha V.

    Why do the Lakers do it? Their 3-headed monster at the point has proved to be an ugly monster indeed — worst PG PER in the league or close to it. Robinson would likely accept this deal (Playing with the Lakers and winning championship would not only be fun, but it would likely inflate his 2010 salary as much having Bird Rights with the Knicks) and he would be a step-up for them — he can hit the three to space the floor for Kobe and Gasol and can create his own shot for a second unit that needs that (Odom is really the only shot-maker they have on the bench). Maybe Jeffries works out for them too, as a spot defensive player…

    Why do we do it? Salary Cap space. Why else we would make a trade? Also, maybe Morrison or Sasha V. (if he’s included, we only save $1.5 off next year’s cap) can find a role in D’Antoni’s offense. Maybe Morrison can be a Tim Thomas like player, who can play okay center for D’Antoni when he can’t play any position well for anyone else. (That’s a stretch — it’s just about the cap space.)

  40. Z

    “If it’s just that they’re allowed to buy him out for 50% of his last year, that’s not as exciting.”

    That is why the Berman paraphrase, if true, is interesting. Apparently, Curry is already talking about a buyout, which I think is probably unprecedented for a player who still needs to exercise an option. If he’s so unhappy that he wants a divorce, he can have one, for free, this summer. All he needs to do is opt out. But since he is entitled (somehow) to $11 million of Dolan’s money next year, simply opting out is financial idiocy. But an agreement can be made, sometime between February 18th and June 31st, to end the contract, paying him half of what he would otherwise make riding the stationary bike next year.

    If Curry exercises his option, there is NO WAY the Knicks then buy him out over the summer, which, according to the Berman paraphrase, seems to be what Big Eddy is hoping for. So, if Curry really wants to part ways with the Knicks, maybe he’d settle for $5.5 million in free money, keeping in mind his financial troubles have been written about in the Tribune.

    And the cryptic quotes of Walsh from last summer (“I have a little leeway that will leave me in good position for next year…I know what it is, but do not talk much about it”) make it seem that he and Curry’s agent may have discussed some sort of arrangement should Curry not find a new work environment by the deadline.

  41. DS

    But why the hell would Curry agree to walk away for anything less than 8 or 9 million/yr? Have we seen any evidence that he cares that much about getting minutes? He has to know that won’t just be handed a rotation spot on any team. Does he think he can get 3 or 4 million a year elsewhere?

  42. Z

    “Have we seen any evidence that he cares that much about getting minutes?”

    There was this quote:

    “It’s frustrating, because I worked so hard to get back and to be ready to go and now it’s just like go every game trying to figure out if I’m going to play or not, sitting over there waiting to see what’s going to happen,” Curry said. “It’s tough to deal with, especially at this stage of my career, at this age. I ain’t that old, but I’ve been here for a while.” (December 26th)

    Of course he’s injured, now, so minutes aren’t really a factor in his unhappiness until he recovers, but since his injury he HAS been talking about a buyout, so, who knows what is really going on in the head of Eddy Curry.

    When it comes to walking away from $5.5 or even $11 million, though, keep in mind stories like these that surfaced right around the time of Walsh’s “good position for next year” quote:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/07/02/eddy-curry-sues-former-ma_n_224764.html

  43. Z

    “I asked Chad Ford for his take on it on his twitter, but the space limits made my question kind of lame, really (I made it sound like Curry was willing to agree to $5.5 million)”

    Brian– this piece paints the picture of Curry’s buyout options:

    http://offthedribble.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/12/27/if-curry-wants-out-knicks-can-make-it-happen/

    The piece outlines all the possible scenarios without judging whether Curry would actually agree to any of them. The author does add this statement, though, in the comments section, which is basically the point I’ve been trying to make here (and one Curry may not quite comprehend as he talks “buyout”):

    “Keep this thought in mind as the season progresses — if Curry DOES make a big stink later on about wanting out, it’s entirely within his power to make it happen. The only thing stopping him would be his wish to have the money AND the greener pastures. It’ll be one or the other, and he’s going to have to live with his choice.”

  44. Z

    I just realized that Larry Coon, who writes the NY Times blog linked above, is the man responsible for the indispensable “Salary Cap FAQ”– the Bible for all laymen trying to understand the NBA CBA. (So one can be sure the technical aspects of the Curry buyout are correct, even if the psychological conclusions aren’t…)

  45. DS

    Z – I assume you agree that the Curry situation would not be addressed before Jeffries is traded. It would clear more cap space and would be more feasible to trade JJ than to shave $5.5 million off of Curry’s by getting him to agree to void half of the money he is owed.

  46. Brian Cronin

    Wow, I had no idea that Larry Coon was the guy behind the FAQ! Then yeah, anything he says regarding salary cap is basically gospel to me.

  47. BigBlueAL

    With the defensive “strategy” the Knicks are using the Lakers will score 140 pts w/o Kobe scoring 30 pts.

  48. Jeff

    Seems like Bynum has traveled at least once or twice and then went over the back on Lee on that rebound to get the Lakers three more points just now.

  49. Z

    “seems like Bynum has traveled at least once or twice and then went over the back on Lee on that rebound to get the Lakers three more points just now.”

    Agree.

    I wonder what is going to tire Lee out faster– playing his ass off or complaining to the refs…

  50. ess-dog

    I’m starting to think we need to keep all these kids. Hill, Nate, Lee, Gallo, Chandler… add Lebron to that mix and I like this team a lot.
    There’s no way we can keep Nate and Lee and add Lebron without moving Jeffries, right?

  51. tastycakes

    I think you add LeBron to this team and keep Lee, Lee becomes as revered as Dave DeBusschere.

    Funny how we can play near-perfect basketball against this team and be tied at the half. The Lakers can’t shoot that rate from downtown, so I just hope the Knick energy stays up. Great half!

  52. Z

    Urban, Rock, and Crow = the new Crosby, Stills, and Nash?

    (Sorry, the Haiti telethon takes precedence over the Knicks Halftime show…)

  53. Droidz1979

    I would love to keep Hill, Gallo, Chandler and Douglas myself..not sure about Nate though, since if we could get a real and decent point guard instead of him and Duhon then i would take that in a heartbeat. Its his size and lack of consistency that i am not sold into.

    Love the way the Knicks are playing by the way, hope they could sustain it and give the Lakers an upset.

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