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Saturday, August 2, 2014

Knicks Morning News (Tuesday, Jun 04 2013)

  • [New York Times] Heat Top Pacers for East Title and Date With Spurs (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 07:36:38 GMT)
    LeBron James walked off the court, stopped on his way to the bench to shake David Beckham’s hand, then exchanged a few high-fives and quick hugs with teammates.    

  • [New York Times] Column: LeBron Wasn’t About to Let Game 7 Get Away (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 07:36:25 GMT)
    What, you expected something else?    

  • [New York Times] Game 7: Heat 99, Pacers 76: LeBron James and Dwyane Wade Lift Heat Over Pacers in Game 7 (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 05:30:13 GMT)
    Miami’s LeBron James and Dwyane Wade found themselves back in perfect harmony, keeping their hopes alive for a second straight championship. The Heat will play the Spurs in the finals starting Thursday.    

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Basketball: Mookie Blaylock Is Charged in Fatal Crash (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 05:13:58 GMT)
    The former N.B.A. All-Star Mookie Blaylock was charged with vehicular homicide in a head-on crash in suburban Atlanta that killed a 43-year-old woman.    

  • [New York Times] Heat, Spurs to Play for NBA Title (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 04:09:07 GMT)
    No more sitting out stars, and for the San Antonio Spurs, no more sitting around.    

  • [New York Times] Heat Off to Finals, Beat Pacers 99-76 in Game 7 (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 04:06:31 GMT)
    Their season, their legacy, their reign atop the NBA was all at stake, and the Miami Heat responded in a manner befitting defending champions — with a blowout.    

  • [New York Times] On Pro Basketball: Some Hints of a Bigger Drama Awaiting Heat (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 03:25:06 GMT)
    Even with three consecutive trips to the finals, the Heat, for a good chunk of the series with the Pacers, looked like a team clinging on, with LeBron James at the helm of an aging, fraying cast.    

  • [New York Times] Off the Dribble: A Selfless Star of Rare Skills Says Goodbye (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 01:12:43 GMT)
    Jason Kidd, who announced his retirement Monday, was a basketball savant who could dominate a game without scoring, who preferred passing to shooting and who elevated his team with his intelligence alone.    

  • [New York Times] Jason Kidd Announces Retirement From N.B.A. (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 00:53:04 GMT)
    Although Jason Kidd, 40, signed a three-year contract last summer with the Knicks, he said all along that he would reassess in the off-season.    

  • [New York Daily News] Not a Kidd anymore: At 40, Jason calls it quits (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 06:10:47 GMT)
    Jason Kidd announced his retirement Monday, just two weeks after being benched in the second half of the Knicks final playoff game against the Indiana Pacers.    

  • [New York Daily News] Lupica: Kidd would have lit up Broadway in his prime (Tue, 04 Jun 2013 04:21:31 GMT)
    The shame of it for Jason Kidd, at the end of one of the great careers any point guard has ever had in basketball, is that when he finally got to Madison Square Garden, to the kind of stage and the kind of spotlight his game always merited, he was already pushing 40.    

  • 27 comments on “Knicks Morning News (Tuesday, Jun 04 2013)

    1. d-mar

      As competitive as the Heat-Pacers series was, Miami won every game handily that they needed to – games 3,5 and 7. When they ramp up the defensive intensity, the Heat are really hard to beat, and honestly, we would have had no chance in a series against them.

      I am rooting really, really hard for the Spurs, but I think the Heat ultimately prevail (unfortunately)

    2. thenamestsam

      d-mar:
      As competitive as the Heat-Pacers series was, Miami won every game handily that they needed to – games 3,5 and 7. When they ramp up the defensive intensity, the Heat are really hard to beat, and honestly, we would have had no chance in a series against them.

      I am rooting really, really hard for the Spurs, but I think the Heat ultimately prevail (unfortunately)

      Agreed that the Heat continue to show how insanely well they can play when they need to. Including Game 2 against the Bulls they’ve now won the 4 playoff games where their backs were against the wall to a certain extent by a combined 99 points. That’s pretty mind boggling. It’s also mind boggling to see a team that consistently has effort issues in the Eastern Conference Finals. To be a lackadaisical in games at this point in the season is not something I ever remember seeing before. The Heat were enough better than Indiana that they could afford to give their 2nd best effort at times at still pull it out. If they do the same against the Spurs I don’t think they’ll be able to get away with it.

      From a matchup perspective I think it’s a fascinating series particularly because of the contrast between the Spurs and the Pacers. We just saw Miami get put to the test because their defense is vulnerable to big punishing players. Now they’ll be put to the test by the team best equipped to beat them with ball movement. As Hubert posted yesterday even with everything Indiana did so well on the defensive end Miami still posted good offensive efficiency stats. You just can’t shut down an offense with that much talent, not with Lebron at the level he’s at. I think the series will be decided at the other end.

    3. mr.JayP

      You have to question if Mia can have the effort consistently. We all know lebron brings it. But wade n bosh are question marks.

      And a few things about the spurs that to me seem interesting is 1- the spurs have size with diaw,splitter,Duncan and bonner and pretty much all of them can hit the J. 2- tony Parker 3- three point shooting.

      The spurs are another team that’s really disciplined. Should be interesting to watch. Pops pretty much has all the films he needs because of this series.

    4. Frank

      Not sure that all the credit should go to Miami for that miserable showing by Indy yesterday. Sure, Miami’s defense was part of it, but that was one of the worst displays of ball security I’ve ever seen. Indy played nervous and had no composure at all.

      I’m really not totally sure what to make of Indiana now — their entire postseason was based on officials giving them the benefit of the doubt on “up and down” contests of drives inside the restricted area. Not only did Hibbert get a ton of no-calls on drives he obviously was not up/down only in contesting, he rarely got a blocking foul called on him in those instances. During the regular season, it sure seemed like most situations like that yielded a defensive blocking call. His ability to not only contest shots successfully but also to stay on the floor without foul trouble changed the NYK and MIA series.

    5. Frank

      IMHO, if I’m the Pacers (and I would hate this if I were the Knicks), I consider offering part of my MLE to Prigioni. For the price, I think he might be the best fit for them — tough, hard-nosed, good defensively both on and off the ball, and plays with composure. They win this series against Miami if Prigs is on their team playing 15 min/game instead of freaking DJ Augustin.

      Crazy to think a vet’s minimum guy could have been the difference. But during the regular season, Augustin was a net -12p/100poss when he was on the floor and George Hill was off. And during the Heat series, he was a -38p/100poss when on the floor and Hill off. Obviously some of that has to do with the fact that he plays with the 2nd unit – but even when he was playing with PG and Hibbert, he was a -42/100poss. (when Hill/PG/Hibbert were on the floor together, Indy was a +17/100poss).

    6. KnickfaninNJ

      Frank, your point is not crazy at all. You could make a case already that Anderson was a vet minimum pickup that swung the series to Miami. Prigioni could do the same for the Pacers. I very much hope his family likes living in NY and doesn’t want to move.

    7. yellowboy90

      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/04/sports/basketball/jason-kidd-announces-retirement-from-nba.html?_r=1&

      “As part of his decision, Kidd has agreed to forgo the final two years of his contract, which means his $3.09 million salary will be removed from the Knicks’ cap figure. However, the Knicks will still be far over the cap and almost certainly over the luxury-tax threshold, barring a major payroll reduction. That means they will be subject to a ban on acquiring players via sign-and-trade deals.”

      DO you think Beck really knows if Jason left the money on the table?

    8. nyk8806

      yellowboy90: DO you think Beck really knows if Jason left the money on the table?

      I’m sure some money moved to a swiss bank account and/or TJ Kidd shows up to training camp in a few years. Who cares as long as Dolan doesn’t get caught.

    9. Hubert

      d-mar:
      When they ramp up the defensive intensity, the Heat are really hard to beat, and honestly, we would have had no chance in a series against them.

      I’m not so sure. Indiana was turnover prone all year. They played to their level in game 7.

      I think we could have withstood Miami’s defensive intensity better than Indiana.

      I don’t think we could have limited Chris Bosh and Ray Allen as well as they did, nor could we have relegated Shane Battier to a DNP-CD. (Wade kind of limited himself, I think that would have occurred if we played them, too.)

      Ultimately, Miami most likely would have prevailed. But I think we also could have forced a 7th game (assuming a healthy Melo & Chandler), and I think we would’ve at least shown up.

    10. Hubert

      Frank:

      I’m really not totally sure what to make of Indiana now — their entire postseason was based on officials giving them the benefit of the doubt on “up and down” contests of drives inside the restricted area.Not only did Hibbert get a ton of no-calls on drives he obviously was not up/down only in contesting, he rarely got a blocking foul called on him in those instances.During the regular season, it sure seemed like most situations like that yielded a defensive blocking call.His ability to not only contest shots successfully but also to stay on the floor without foul trouble changed the NYK and MIA series.

      Not enough is being made of this. They re-wrote the rulebook for Roy Hibbert this spring. Is this going to become the new normal in the league? Just a bunch of guys committing blocking fouls and taking whacks at players heads but getting away with it because they jumped straight up? It was a load of horse shit.

    11. Hubert

      There should have been a movement on twitter by now. #RoyHibbertRules.

      I just called you a bitch but I jumped straight up so no repercussions.

      I just sucker punched you but I jumped straight up so you can’t be mad.

      I stole your money but I jumped straight up so it’s mine.

      I used an offensive homophobic term in a press conference but I jumped straight up so y’all motherf’ers need to chill.

    12. thenamestsam

      Hubert: Not enough is being made of this.They re-wrote the rulebook for Roy Hibbert this spring.Is this going to become the new normal in the league?Just a bunch of guys committing blocking fouls and taking whacks at players heads but getting away with it because they jumped straight up?It was a load of horse shit.

      I thought it was weird that nobody in the media really seemed to be talking about this. In both the Knicks series and the Heat series (can’t say I watched a single minute of the Hawks series) he was allowed to defend players in the restricted area, while moving side to side, not only making contact with players lower bodies but also frequently hitting their arms. But apparently as long as his arms were raised straight in the air and he jumped this was not a defensive foul. I’ve never seen another NBA player officiated in this manner.

      My two major issues: One, if he had fallen over backwards those plays would have been obvious blocks because he was in the restricted area AND not set. But somehow because he blocks them more by jumping in the air instead of falling backwards it is no longer a blocking foul. I’d love for someone to explain that to me. And two, it seemed that officials got so sucked into the issue of verticality which was constantly being harped on that they started completely ignoring lower body contact so they could focus entirely on whether a guy is vertical. Hell, even the infamous Melo block had a lot of lower body contact that went uncalled but that was far from the most egregious one. Hibbert was leaping into guys with his whole body and getting away with it because his arms were straight up. Very strange.

    13. Hubert

      Not only did they not talk about it, but they started talking about jumping straight up as if it was a thing that always existed and they expected us not to wonder why this was the first time it was ever happening.

      “Yeah, he kinda thumped Carmelo in the head there, but look at how vertical his jump was.”

    14. Hubert

      thenamestsam: Hibbert was leaping into guys with his whole body and getting away with it because his arms were straight up. Very strange.

      This is the real crux of it all. He was hip checking everyone who came in the lane but he got the refs to just look at his arms! It was like a magician using misdirection. I mean, I guess credit to him, but how the hell did it work????

      One thing we were all wrong about, though: we all thought we were getting the shaft and that he’d never get away with that stuff against LeBron. But he did.

    15. nyk8806

      Hubert: how the hell did it work????

      “These aren’t the fouls you’re looking for.” The farce is strong with this one.

      I’m more surprised Spoelstra or other players haven’t complained about it more. It will be interesting to see if the Spurs try to emulate Roy Hibbert Rules to some extent and see if it works.

    16. Nick C.

      How do you whack someone if you “jump straight up with your arms vetrtical”? I don’t follow.

    17. Hubert

      There were several instances in his series against us, particularly in game 1 vs Melo, where he initially went straight up and then moved his arms forward at the last minute to hit Melo in the head. Check out the 4Q of game 1, after Melo picked up his 5th foul on what needed to be called a block on Hibbert but they called it an offensive foul on Melo because Roy “jumped straight up” in the restricted area.

    18. Hubert

      Actually…

      2. Guarding an Opponent
      In all guarding situations, a player is entitled to any spot on the court he desires, provided
      he legally gets to that spot first and without contact with an opponent. If a defensive or
      offensive player has established a position on the floor and his opponent initiates contact
      that results in the dislodging of the opponent, a foul should be called IMMEDIATELY.
      A player may continue to move after gaining a guarding position in the path of an opponent
      provided he is not moving directly or obliquely toward his opponent when contact
      occurs. A player is never permitted to move into the path of an opponent after the opponent
      has jumped into the air.

      A player who extends a hand, forearm, shoulder, hip or leg into the path of an opponent
      and thereby causes contact is not considered to have a legal position in the path of an opponent.
      A player is entitled to a vertical position even to the extent of holding his arms above
      his shoulders, as in post play or when double-teaming in pressing tactics.
      Any player who conforms to the above is absolved from responsibility for any contact
      by an opponent which may dislodge or tend to dislodge such player from the position which he has attained and is maintaining legally.
      If contact occurs, the official must decide whether
      the contact is incidental or a foul has been committed.

    19. Hubert

      The restricted area simply absolves the offensive player from a charge, it doesn’t automatically make the impeding party guilty of a block:

      An offensive foul should not be called for charging if the contact is with a secondary defensive player who has established a defensive position within a designated “restricted
      area” near the basket for the purpose of drawing an offensive foul. The offensive player must
      take a path directly to the rim. The “restricted area” for this purpose is the area bounded by
      an arc with a 4-foot radius measured from the center of the basket ring.
      EXCEPTION: Any player may be legally positioned within the “restricted area” if the
      offensive player receives the ball within the Lower Defensive Box

    20. chrisk06811

      Quick word association. I’m gonna type a word, you respond with the first word that comes to mind…..

      SHUMP

    21. max fisher-cohen

      I give Vogel a ton of credit for the way Hibbert was officiated. Every TV interview just about he says the same things: “I told my guys to go straight up and down; don’t foul; don’t put them on the line”. Whether or not officials see these interviews (and I’m sure they do), it puts the question to the media/commentators of how bigs should be officiated so that if officials called fouls on Hibbert, they would undoubtedly turn it into uproar.

    22. ruruland

      Hubert:
      The restricted area simply absolves the offensive player from a charge, it doesn’t automatically make the impeding party guilty of a block:

      An offensive foul should not be called for charging if the contact is with a secondary defensive player who has established a defensive position within a designated “restricted
      area” near the basket for the purpose of drawing an offensive foul. The offensive player must
      take a path directly to the rim. The “restricted area” for this purpose is the area bounded by
      an arc with a 4-foot radius measured from the center of the basket ring.
      EXCEPTION: Any player may be legally positioned within the “restricted area” if the
      offensive player receives the ball within the Lower Defensive Box

      Great job, Hubert.

      I don’t think I need to mention how this would specifically apply to some of the Knicks.

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