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Thursday, April 24, 2014

Knicks Morning News (Thursday, May 31 2012)

  • [New York Times] Playoffs | Game 2: Heat 115, Celtics 111 (OT): Heat Withstand Big Night by Rondo and Lead Series, 2-0 (Thu, 31 May 2012 07:24:06 GMT)
    The Celtics’ Rajon Rondo scored 44 points to lead all players, but the Heat still got the victory behind LeBron James’s 34 points and Dwyane Wade’s 23 points.

  • [New York Times] Thunder Deny They Were Grasping at Straws by Grabbing at Splitter (Thu, 31 May 2012 05:45:21 GMT)
    The Thunder say they were merely trying to slow the Spurs by fouling the backup center Tiago Splitter repeatedly in Game 2.

  • [New York Times] Hornets Land Top Pick in N.B.A. Draft (Thu, 31 May 2012 06:25:42 GMT)
    New Orleans won the No. 1 pick in the draft lottery, and because the Nets missed out on a top-three pick, they will send their first-round selection to Portland.

  • [New York Times] Jordan Tells Ewing He Won’t Be Bobcats Head Coach (Thu, 31 May 2012 05:44:25 GMT)
    The Charlotte Bobcats, who finished 7-59 this season, will hire a coach within the next couple of weeks, but it will not be Patrick Ewing.

  • [New York Times] Hornets Win Draft Lottery, Will Pick No. 1 in NBA (Thu, 31 May 2012 08:36:00 GMT)
    After a painful wait for a new owner, the search for a new star was a breeze for the New Orleans Hornets.

  • [New York Times] Heat Overcome Rondo, Top Boston 115-111 in Game 2 (Thu, 31 May 2012 08:09:07 GMT)
    Rajon Rondo posted a stat line never before seen in NBA playoff history. He was on the court for every second of a game that finished more than three hours after it started. He scored more points in a single overtime than anyone this season.

  • [New York Times] Rondo’s One-Man Show Earns Kudos but Not Victory (Thu, 31 May 2012 06:39:18 GMT)
    Rajon Rondo delivered an extraordinary playoff performance for the Boston Celtics, racking up 44 points against the Miami Heat, but still ended up on the losing side in a heartbreaking overtime loss on Wednesday.

  • [New York Times] Rondo’s 44 Not Enough for Celtics in Game 2 (Thu, 31 May 2012 05:11:55 GMT)
    Rajon Rondo played every second for the Boston Celtics. Made just about every play. Made just about every shot, too.

  • [New York Times] Heat Edge Overtime Win as Rondo Sizzles for Boston (Thu, 31 May 2012 06:09:14 GMT)
    The Miami Heat withstood a virtuoso performance from Rajon Rondo, who tallied a career-high 44 points, to emerge with a 115-111 overtime victory over the Boston Celtics and claim a 2-0 Eastern Conference finals lead on Wednesday.

  • [New York Times] Game 2: Heat 115, Celtics 111 (OT): Heat Win Despite Rondo’s Scoring Outburst (Thu, 31 May 2012 05:02:54 GMT)
    The Celtics’ Rajon Rondo played all 53 minutes and scored 44 points, with 10 assists and eight rebounds, but the Heat still got the victory behind LeBron James’s 34 points.

  • [New York Times] Hornets Win Draft Lottery After Dismal Season (Thu, 31 May 2012 03:51:36 GMT)
    The New Orleans Hornets were awarded the top pick in next month’s National Basketball Association (NBA) draft after winning the annual lottery that favors weaker teams on Wednesday.

  • [New York Times] Flopping, Flagrants, Olympics on Stern’s Mind (Thu, 31 May 2012 01:06:28 GMT)
    David Stern wants to take a closer look at flopping and referees to be able to take a second look at all flagrant fouls.

  • [New York Times] Hornets Win Draft Lottery, Will Pick No. 1 in NBA (Thu, 31 May 2012 02:23:50 GMT)
    New owner, and now a new star player. The future suddenly looks bright for the New Orleans Hornets.

  • [New York Post] Stern wants ‘sparks’ in Knicks-Nets rivalry (Thu, 31 May 2012 04:24:33 -0500)
    It will be, in the eyes of NBA commissioner David Stern, the perfect blend of competition, hatred, geography and, hopefully, TV ratings.
    It will be a real rivalry, the Brooklyn Nets versus the New York Knicks.
    “I am hoping, for more sparks, a few verbal, some build up,â? Stern said…

  • [New York Post] Lucky Hornets win Davis sweepstakes (Thu, 31 May 2012 01:05:12 -0500)
    Shortly after New Orleans general manager Dell Demps handed off the souvenir ping pong balls that made the Hornets the big prize winner for Kentucky’s Anthony Davis in the NBA Draft Lottery, he was approached by Brooklyn Nets counterpart Billy King.”So, you want to trade the pick?â? King…

  • [New York Daily News] BobcatsALL scratch Ewing from head coaching job (Thu, 31 May 2012 02:15:59 GMT)
    Patrick Ewing may be part of Michael Jordan’s inner circle but he won’t be coaching Jordan’s team. And that might not be such a bad thing.

  • 26 comments on “Knicks Morning News (Thursday, May 31 2012)

    1. johnlocke

      After that horrible non-call on Rondo — why doesn’t the NBA mimic the NFL and give coaches 2 challenges.

      In order to challenge, you’d have to call a timeout, before the other team shoots the basketball. If you’re right, you regain the timeout and if the player was fouled on a shot, gets to shoot the FTs. If you’re wrong you lose a timeout (maybe 2 timeouts).

      Maybe this isn’t the best idea, but clear missed calls in crucial situations starts to harm the credibility of the game. This should be right up there with the anti-flopping movement

    2. thenamestsam

      Wow, what a game last night. Rondo was insane. The scoring was obviously a ton of randomness going his way, but playing 53 minutes and making every big play for your team is one of the more impressive things I’ve ever seen. As much as I hate Boston in general and that team specifically, I do respect how freaking tough they are. It seems like they make every single game and series a little tougher on their opponent than it should be. After they played such a great first half, had the huge lead and then watched it get entirely washed away in the third quarter, the resilience to keep coming was amazing.

      And props are due to Miami as well. They showed a lot of spirit last night. Every time they needed a bucket they got one, and even with Rondo going off they probably should have won in regulation if not for a few bad plays in the last minute. Lebron has been relentlessly criticized in the past for being too passive when his shot isn’t going down, but he attacked the basket over and over last night and got to the line enough to salvage a terrible shooting night. As I’ve said before, it’s huge for Miami to keep this series relatively short given how much they’ve been playing their big guns. Last night was a big step towards that. They should get the job done in 5 now.

    3. thenamestsam

      johnlocke:
      After that horrible non-call on Rondo — why doesn’t the NBA mimic the NFL and give coaches 2 challenges.

      In order to challenge, you’d have to call a timeout, before the other team shoots the basketball. If you’re right, you regain the timeout and if the player was fouled on a shot, gets to shoot the FTs. If you’re wrong you lose a timeout (maybe 2 timeouts).

      Maybe this isn’t the best idea, but clear missed calls in crucial situations starts to harm the credibility of the game.This should be right up there with the anti-flopping movement

      Honestly, I don’t think challenges can work in the NBA. They’re natural in the NFL or MLB, where there’s a break between every play and so it’s easy to continue the game from the point where the missed call was made. But in a game that flows like the NBA it messes all kinds of things up. Last night for example imagine that Wade had actually missed Rondo’s face. The Heat threw the ball out in transition and got an easy dunk. If Rivers throws his challenge flag, now the game is stopped, the refs go over to look at the monitor and determine that Rondo wasn’t fouled. Now what happens? Do you magically restart the game with the Heat running the break? Or do you start from a dead ball? If it’s a dead ball then you’re allowing the opposing coach to break up other teams fast breaks using their challenges. That’s a pretty serious issue. So maybe instead you have to wait until the next dead ball to challenge. Suppose that’s 3 minutes after the foul. Now what happens? If the challenge is successful you just pretend the game wasn’t happening the last three minutes and rewind to that spot?

      I don’t think it’s a big deal. The flopping thing is an epidemic. Missed calls are, and always have been, part of the game. This one just happened to be really obvious, and at a critical moment. Two days from now, it’s…

    4. TelegraphedPass

      johnlocke: After that horrible non-call on Rondo — why doesn’t the NBA mimic the NFL and give coaches 2 challenges. In order to challenge, you’d have to call a timeout, before the other team shoots the basketball. If you’re right, you regain the timeout and if the player was fouled on a shot, gets to shoot the FTs. If you’re wrong you lose a timeout (maybe 2 timeouts). Maybe this isn’t the best idea, but clear missed calls in crucial situations starts to harm the credibility of the game. This should be right up there with the anti-flopping movement

      Honestly, I couldn’t agree less. That non-call wasn’t horrible. People are talking about it like Rondo took a forearm shiver at the rim. It honestly wasn’t that clear of a foul. It took multiple camera angles for US to even see he got hit. Yeah, it sucks that calls are missed sometimes but it will happen. In a game where Garnett was putting hands on LeBron like E. Honda, people rooting against Miami are really reaching to act like that play was egregious.

    5. johnlocke

      True, all good points. They do add and subtract points at the end of quarters or during time outs or even during halftime based on video review, but dealing with missed calls is tough, b/c there are just more calls in basketball than many other sports. They’re already addressing some kinds of missed calls (shots after the buzzer, three pointers with foot on the lline)…which are also due to referee error. Just b/c it’s difficult, doesn’t mean it couldn’t be addressed with real-time technology — we are in the 21st century.

      thenamestsam: Honestly, I don’t think challenges can work in the NBA. They’re natural in the NFL or MLB, where there’s a break between every play and so it’s easy to continue the game from the point where the missed call was made. But in a game that flows like the NBA it messes all kinds of things up. Last night for example imagine that Wade had actually missed Rondo’s face. T

    6. johnlocke

      It was a clear foul, he got hit in the face by Wade and it affected the outcome of the game. What if that had happened in Game 7 of the finals? What if it was Carmelo. The “missed calls” are a part of the game is a completely different argument, from referees should be allowed to use their judgement. If you think that call was up to the referees’ judgment, then I disagree.

      TelegraphedPass: Honestly, I couldn’t agree less. That non-call wasn’t horrible. People are talking about it like Rondo took a forearm shiver at the rim. It honestly wasn’t that clear of a foul. It took multiple camera angles for US to even see he got hit. Yeah, it sucks that calls are missed sometimes but it will happen. In a game where Garnett was putting hands on LeBron like E. Honda, people rooting against Miami are really reaching to act like that play was egregious.

    7. thenamestsam

      johnlocke:
      True, all good points. They do add and subtract points at the end of quarters or during time outs or even during halftime based on video review, but dealing with missed calls is tough, b/c there are just more calls in basketball than many other sports. They’re already addressing some kinds of missed calls (shots after the buzzer, three pointers with foot on the lline)…which are also due to referee error.Just b/c it’s difficult, doesn’t mean it couldn’t be addressed with real-time technology — we are in the 21st century.

      Well I think the situations they’re already using it in are the ones that avoid the problems I’m talking about. Changing whether a basket counts or not, or whether it counts as two or three doesn’t affect the flow of the game. Changing something where play went on to something where play is stopped is a completely different animal. It’s not a matter of technology unless the technology can make the call essentially instantly. I can’t see anything else working.

      @7 I agree that it was a clear foul, but I do think people are acting like it was a bit more egregious than it was. For one, the shot was already out of his hand. He was missing that layup regardless. Secondly, he did barely get him. There are some angles where it doesn’t even look like he touched him.

      Of course it affected the outcome of the game. Every call, made or missed by the refs affects the outcome. They missed a blatant foul by Rondo on James on the possession immediately preceding the Rondo one. That one also affected the outcome of the game. This one is just getting a ton of play because they showed a lot of replays of it. Missed calls are a part of the game. If it had happened in Game 7 of the finals I guarantee we could easily look back and find a missed call the other way sometime in the previous 3 minutes of game time. These things even out.

    8. TelegraphedPass

      johnlocke: It was a clear foul, he got hit in the face by Wade and it affected the outcome of the game. What if that had happened in Game 7 of the finals? What if it was Carmelo. The “missed calls” are a part of the game is a completely different argument, from referees should be allowed to use their judgement. If you think that call was up to the referees’ judgment, then I disagree.

      If it was Carmelo, he wouldn’t get the call like what happened all year. It was a foul, but if Rondo didn’t throw his head back and take long to get up we might not even have noticed it. It wasn’t a hard foul by any means, so why are we acting like the refs swallowed their whistles on a right hook?

      It took me a couple replays to see the foul. It wasn’t that ridiculous. It was a missed foul, but come on. Those happen all game long for both teams. There is no reasonable way to correct the issue.

    9. formido

      I love Lebron. I was rooting for Miami to win the title last year to shut all the haters up, and I’m rooting for him this year too. But, Lebron has had TONS of good games in the 4th quarter. He’s had plenty of “clutch” games. That’s not why he’s criticized. He’s criticized for getting passive in championship deciding games. In loser-out games. If he makes it through this whole playoffs, including next series, without standing around on offense and defense during important 4th quarters, THEN he can shrug off the criticism.

      We’re talking about the greatest athlete who’s every played the game. He can point to last night as vindication if he only wants to be considered good. But if he wants to be compared to Jordan, as lots of onlookers want to do, he has to do it every time. There can’t be long stretches of critical 4th quarters where you don’t even know he’s on the court, other than for the fact that the commentators are specifically noting that he’s just standing around looking lost.

      I think I saw every Chicago playoff game during Jordan’s championship years. He (rarely) had bad games. But he never disappeared at crucial moments. He always made plays, good or bad. Lebron has a long way to go prove he’s rehabilitated his demeanor.

      thenamestsam: Lebron has been relentlessly criticized in the past for being too passive when his shot isn’t going down, but he attacked the basket over and over last night and got to the line enough to salvage a terrible shooting night.

    10. formido

      Of, course, part of the problem is that, in season-deciding games, if he’s been stymied a bit on drives, he doesn’t have a turn-around or pull-up move that he believes in. His team wants him to shoot, but the pressure’s too high and he doesn’t have that go to shot in his repertoire. He doesn’t have the killer instinct that says “we are going to win and I want everyone to know that we won solely because of me”. That’s why he’s the best team basketball player but the flipside is it’s a flaw in these situations.

      This is something that always bothered me with Nash, too. He’d lead a team right up to the brink, but at the ends of games, when his teammates were floundering, he’d let them flounder them right off the edge, when you really just wanted him to take his best-shot-in-the-league and put it up! No matter how good you think your team offense is, good defensive teams can ramp up the energy and shut it down for a few brief critical minutes. It would happen every time with the Suns.

    11. thenamestsam

      formido:
      I love Lebron. I was rooting for Miami to win the title last year to shut all the haters up, and I’m rooting for him this year too. But, Lebron has had TONS of good games in the 4th quarter. He’s had plenty of “clutch” games. That’s not why he’s criticized. He’s criticized for getting passive in championship deciding games. In loser-out games. If he makes it through this whole playoffs, including next series, without standing around on offense and defense during important 4th quarters, THEN he can shrug off the criticism.

      We’re talking about the greatest athlete who’s every played the game. He can point to last night as vindication if he only wants to be considered good. But if he wants to be compared to Jordan, as lots of onlookers want to do, he has to do it every time. There can’t be long stretches of critical 4th quarters where you don’t even know he’s on the court, other than for the fact that the commentators are specifically noting that he’s just standing around looking lost.

      I think I saw every Chicago playoff game during Jordan’s championship years. He (rarely) had bad games. But he never disappeared at crucial moments. He always made plays, good or bad. Lebron has a long way to go prove he’s rehabilitated his demeanor.

      Wasn’t trying to say at all that last night was some kind of complete vindication for Lebron. That would obviously be ridiculous and I don’t think you can honestly say that I even suggested it. Just giving credit where credit is due. He had a horrible night shooting last night, even on layups and dunks. But he salvaged a pretty good performance by having the mentality to get to the line repeatedly. Obviously to answer his critics he needs to do it again and again, and in even bigger spots than that, but last night was a good step. That’s all.

    12. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      You know, Nowitzki was a choke artist for his whole career until he dominated the league’s best teams last year. So cut the whole “LeBron chokes” schtick out. It’s post facto bullshit framed and constructed by the media. He’s the best player in the NBA and there isn’t much of a competition.

      Also, if you don’t think a person — no, THREE people — standing within 20 feet can’t see this foul, you, too, are blind.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzW38LAJsII

    13. thenamestsam

      The Honorable Cock Jowles:
      You know, Nowitzki was a choke artist for his whole career until he dominated the league’s best teams last year. So cut the whole “LeBron chokes” schtick out. It’s post facto bullshit framed and constructed by the media. He’s the best player in the NBA and there isn’t much of a competition.

      Also, if you don’t think a person — no, THREE people — standing within 20 feet can’t see this foul, you, too, are blind.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzW38LAJsII

      A little confusing with your double negatives, but you think they saw it and decided not to call it?

      When I watch that video I can easily see how at full speed from 20 feet away you could miss it. First of all, watching the video you know exactly what you’re looking for. You’re watching his face. The refs aren’t. They’re watching his entire body, looking for contact on the lower body, on the arm, on his chest. And not only that, but they’re not just watching Rondo. They’re watching 10 guys. Probably mostly focused on Rondo, but still. Secondly, from some of those angles it legitimately looks like he misses him. The 2nd angle, for example, from behind Rondo it looks like he pulls his arm away just before making contact. The reason: The contact was incredibly quick. His hand is pulled away super quickly. For a ref looking at a bunch of different things it’s a tough call. Finally, when you make an unexpected play it makes the refs job much harder. Rondo shifts his body in such an odd manner and takes the layup from such an unexpected angle that it makes the whole play very unusual. Consequently, it’s not a normal block attempt. Wade’s hand, his body position, the motion he makes. All of it is non-standard. That makes it much tougher to process in real-time.

    14. d-mar

      I think what raised everyone’s eyebrows a little was that last possession for Miami, where LeBron has Rondo guarding him and ends up shooting a brick fallaway at the buzzer. Not saying you can judge his entire game by that play, but he has to come up with a better shot than that or at least drive it to the hole to try and draw a foul.

      I guess you could say it’s a good sign that he even took the last shot, as opposed to giving the ball up to Wade as he has done in the past.

    15. d-mar

      BTW, I have zero sympathy for any Celtic crying about the non-call on Rondo, they’ve been getting the benefit of the whistle for years (see Paul Pierce’s exaggerated falls on touch fouls, KG’s blatantly illegal screens,etc. etc.)

    16. TelegraphedPass

      d-mar: I think what raised everyone’s eyebrows a little was that last possession for Miami, where LeBron has Rondo guarding him and ends up shooting a brick fallaway at the buzzer. Not saying you can judge his entire game by that play, but he has to come up with a better shot than that or at least drive it to the hole to try and draw a foul.I guess you could say it’s a good sign that he even took the last shot, as opposed to giving the ball up to Wade as he has done in the past.

      There is no victory for LeBron James. Remember the All-Star game, where he tried to make the right play, turned it over and cost the East the victory? Except he was single-handedly the ONLY reason the East was in the game late in the first place?

      Remember him passing to UD for a wide open jumper close to the end of the season, only for Udonis to miss and his psyche to be called into question for the trillionth time?

      In clutch situations, it isn’t enough for LeBron to simply take shots. The narrative is established already. Despite the facts, LeBron will be seen as not clutch unless he leads his team to at least 3 titles. Kobe can continue to shoot under 35% in crunchtime because his rep is solid. LBJ has no such luxury.

    17. thenamestsam

      d-mar:
      I think what raised everyone’s eyebrows a little was that last possession for Miami, where LeBron has Rondo guarding him and ends up shooting a brick fallaway at the buzzer. Not saying you can judge his entire game by that play, but he has to come up with a better shot than that or at least drive it to the hole to try and draw a foul.

      I guess you could say it’s a good sign that he even took the last shot, as opposed to giving the ball up to Wade as he has done in the past.

      Everyone likes to say this, but I think it’s a silly criticism. When was the last time you saw someone get a layup to win a playoff game on the last shot? It just doesn’t really happen, and it doesn’t happen for a reason.

      Go back to the tape and look at that play again. As, Lebron looks to drive both Allen and KG are right on the edge of the lane, and Dooling is helping way off of Chalmers to Lebrons left if he tries to cross over. There’s no lane to drive there. If he drives all the way to the basket he’s going to be trying to finish over three players who are in position. He’s not going to get a call there. If he drives further than where he did to pull up, Allen is going to double him and he’s either going to get a more difficult jumper with a second guy on him, or kick to Battier in the corner for a 3. If he does that, he A. Gets killed again for passing, and B. Is a Battier 3 really a better look than the jumper he got? There’s just no way to get any better look than what he got without getting doubled which means either passing it or taking a shot while doubled, which is more difficult. If you want Lebron to shoot, I can’t see where he could get a better look than what he got.

    18. johnlocke

      The only other sport that may be tougher to referee than basketball, could be soccer so completely understand missing calls is ‘normal’. Would be interesting to know how the NBA has innovated in this area over the last 30 years beyond video tape review of flagrant 2s, close three point shots and shots at the buzzer.

      d-mar:
      BTW, I have zero sympathy for any Celtic crying about the non-call on Rondo, they’ve been getting the benefit of the whistle for years (see Paul Pierce’s exaggerated falls on touch fouls, KG’s blatantly illegal screens,etc. etc.)

    19. d-mar

      thenamestsam: Everyone likes to say this, but I think it’s a silly criticism. When was the last time you saw someone get a layup to win a playoff game on the last shot? It just doesn’t really happen, and it doesn’t happen for a reason.

      Go back to the tape and look at that play again. As, Lebron looks to drive both Allen and KG are right on the edge of the lane, and Dooling is helping way off of Chalmers to Lebrons left if he tries to cross over. There’s no lane to drive there. If he drives all the way to the basket he’s going to be trying to finish over three players who are in position. He’s not going to get a call there. If he drives further than where he did to pull up, Allen is going to double him and he’s either going to get a more difficult jumper with a second guy on him, or kick to Battier in the corner for a 3. If he does that, he A. Gets killed again for passing, and B. Is a Battier 3 really a better look than the jumper he got? There’s just no way to get any better look than what he got without getting doubled which means either passing it or taking a shot while doubled, which is more difficult. If you want Lebron to shoot, I can’t see where he could get a better look than what he got.

      I still think he has to force the issue. If he gets triple teamed as he drives, so be it, make something happen. But I do think it’s absolutely unfair to criticize LeBron if he passes to an open shooter who misses, Jordan did that countless times with Paxson and Kerr, and they happened to make the shots.

    20. thenamestsam

      d-mar: I still think he has to force the issue. If he gets triple teamed as he drives, so be it, make something happen. But I do think it’s absolutely unfair to criticize LeBron if he passes to an open shooter who misses, Jordan did that countless times with Paxson and Kerr, and they happened to make the shots.

      Oh, I agree. I’d much rather see Lebron make the right basketball play, and I don’t care who shoots as long as you get the best shot. But that attitude is rare, and a lot of the people criticizing Lebron’s shot choice are the same people who would criticize him if he passed the ball. To me that’s a contradiction.

      Best play available in my opinion was to back down Rondo, wait for Dooling to double, which he would have, and kick to Chalmers, who was hot, for an open wing 3. But I think Lebron actually got a good shot there. He makes that what 40% maybe? You’re not going to get a better look than that in that situation very often. Didn’t go in, but it was a fine look.

    21. jon abbey

      refs last night: I don’t know why no one is talking about how a big part of the disparity was because Boston seemed to have a team-wide philosophy from the start to foul and make Miami shoot FTs instead of easy baskets. I thought it was a pretty fairly reffed game, but I was rooting for Miami.

      LeBron: again, I don’t see why people are so confused about this.

      is he the best player in the league? most certainly.

      is he a “choke artist”? no, that’s maybe the dumbest and most overused term in sports (example: the Yankees did not choke in 2004, they lost four straight games to a superior team who shouldn’t have been down 3-0 to begin with).

      does he have problems over the last few seasons delivering in tight, end-of-game situations? pretty obviously, yes. whether that’s because of a flaw in his game or because he expends SO MUCH energy on both ends all game long or because of mental issues a la A-Rod circa 2007 or so, who knows, but there’s certainly an issue there.

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