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Friday, September 19, 2014

Knicks Morning News (Thursday, May 24 2012)

  • [New York Daily News] Finishing touches being put on Woodson’s new deal (Thu, 24 May 2012 03:13:12 GMT)
    Mike Woodson’s new contract is now in the hands of his attorneys with an announcement from the Knicks likely to come no later than Thursday.

  • [New York Times] Game 6: Sixers 82, Celtics 75: Sixers Prevail and Force Game 7 in Boston (Thu, 24 May 2012 05:30:11 GMT)
    Philadelphia, led by Jrue Holiday, outscored the Celtics by 10 points after halftime as the Sixers won at home to force the first Game 7 between the old rivals since 1982.

  • [New York Times] N.B.A. Playoffs: N.B.A. Playoffs — Haslem and Pittman of Heat Suspended for Fouls (Thu, 24 May 2012 05:30:11 GMT)
    After committing flagrant fouls in Game 5 against the Pacers, Udonis Haslem will have to sit out Miami’s next game and Dexter Pittman will miss the next three.

  • [New York Times] Analysis: Big East Greets New Faces but Braces for Uncertainty (Thu, 24 May 2012 05:39:06 GMT)
    Big East officials hope conference members will stay together long enough to enjoy the fruits of a lucrative television contract in the fall.

  • [New York Times] 76ers Fight Off Boston to Force Game Seven (Thu, 24 May 2012 04:19:32 GMT)
    The Philadelphia 76ers ground out an 82-75 win over the Boston Celtics on Wednesday to force a deciding Game Seven in their Eastern Conference second-round playoff series.

  • [New York Times] 76ers Fight Off Celtics to Force Game Seven (Thu, 24 May 2012 03:26:08 GMT)
    The Philadelphia 76ers ground out an 82-75 win over the Boston Celtics on Wednesday to force a deciding Game Seven in their Eastern Conference second-round playoff series.

  • [New York Times] 76ers Top Celtics to Force Game 7 in East Semis (Thu, 24 May 2012 10:05:44 GMT)
    In the most unpredictable of playoff series, Rajon Rondo was the one consistent playmaker for Boston.

  • [New York Times] Police Say 16-Year-Old Shot Eight Outside NBA Game (Thu, 24 May 2012 02:49:37 GMT)
    A 16-year-old boy is in custody and suspected of opening fire after an NBA game on Monday, injuring eight people who had gathered outside an arena to watch the Oklahoma City Thunder play the Los Angeles Lakers, police said on Wednesday.

  • [New York Times] Uncertainty Shrouds Gasol’s Future With Lakers (Thu, 24 May 2012 01:25:34 GMT)
    Pau Gasol expressed uncertainty about his future with the Los Angeles Lakers after his postseason exit interview with general manager Mitch Kupchak at the team’s training facility on Wednesday.

  • [New York Times] Off the Dribble: Russell Westbrook Stays in Control (Thu, 24 May 2012 01:43:55 GMT)
    Thunder guard Russell Westbrook has cut down on the turnovers that hurt the team last season — and improved his shooting.

  • [New York Times] Off the Dribble: Thunder and Spurs Set to Battle on the Boards (Thu, 24 May 2012 01:35:24 GMT)
    There are dozens of factors that could end up deciding the Western Conference finals, but the Oklahoma City Thunder’s ability to grab offensive rebounds could help their efforts considerably against the San Antonio Spurs.

  • [New York Post] But he won’t share it with Isiah (Thu, 24 May 2012 03:47:12 -0500)
    Mike Woodson has been linked to a handful of great defensive coaches, learning in college from Indiana’s Bobby Knight, as a rookie forward from Knicks legend Red Holzman and as a defensive assistant in winning an NBA championship with Hall of Famer Larry Brown in Detroit.
    It is a…

  • 81 comments on “Knicks Morning News (Thursday, May 24 2012)

    1. Matt Smith

      So Odom wants to come to NY – might be worth the MLE if he’ll take it. I think it’s fair to say his drop in production last year came mostly from hating where he was.

      But I haven’t really thought of how he’d fit in with our current set up.

    2. Frank

      Matt Smith:
      So Odom wants to come to NY – might be worth the MLE if he’ll take it. I think it’s fair to say his drop in production last year came mostly from hating where he was.

      But I haven’t really thought of how he’d fit in with our current set up.

      If Odom has his head screwed on straight, he could be huge for us. He won’t get the MLE (not worth it after the loser year and attitude he had this year) – I can’t imagine any team taking that kind of a commitment with him given how much he quit on the Mavs this year. I think the most I would give him is the BAE or vet’s minimum because Lin is getting the MLE. Even if the NBPA wins that arbitration re: Early Bird rights, I think Steve Nash or JR get first sniff at the MLE that we will have left over.

      btw – more stuff that box score stats (even hoopdata shot locations) don’t catch. Rajon Rondo is the best shooter in the LEAGUE from just beyond the elbow. In other words, that shot that teams are giving him is a shot that Boston should WANT him to take.

      http://deadspin.com/5912397/?utm_campaign=socialflow_deadspin_twitter&utm_source=deadspin_twitter&utm_medium=socialflow

    3. Brian Cronin

      Why do you think that one specific section behind the three-point arc is so much worse than the others? Seems so odd that 40% would be the high there.

    4. Owen

      Probably gets a lot of defensive attention? Often clogged by pick and roll defenders. Further? No idea though. It is curious….

      It would be interesting to see if there is a year to year correlation in these numbers. Amazing also to see nick young’s face on such a chart.

    5. Frank

      Another great find from Kirk Goldsberry:

      http://courtvisionanalytics.com/behold-the-worst-shooters-of-2012/

      One Amare Stoudemire has the WORST shooting percentage (by zone) of the entire league from 16-23 feet on the R side of the floor (16%), and took just about 10% of all his shots from there. Just to give an idea about how much that affected his shooting percentage — if he shot just 36% from that area (which would still be well below his career % from 16-23 feet), he would have scored 847 (rather than 823) points on 655 FGA and 186 FTA, which would have equaled a TS of 57.5 (rather than 54.5). And suddenly this year wouldn’t have looked so terrible for him.

      You have to figure most teams (including our own) have this kind of data…. right?

    6. Frank

      I’ll just keep writing.

      So according to that ESPN article from the other day, MSG is one of the 10 arenas that is outfitted with Sportvu technology. So my guess is Woodson et al. have all this info and more. Would be very interesting to see the month-to-month shot charts for players as this data accumulated.

      ICYMI – here’s that article from ESPN re: the future of analytics:
      http://espn.go.com/blog/playbook/tech/post/_/id/492/492

    7. Brian Cronin

      You have to figure most teams (including our own) have this kind of data…. right?

      No doubt. But it is one thing to have the data and it is a whole other thing to convince players to change their habits based on the data.

    8. Brian Cronin

      Is that Melo chart just for this past season? If so, I dunno how helpful it is since I think we all concede that Melo had an off year on the jumper. He just couldn’t nail the 7-9 foot jumper to save his life. And I have to think that his wrist injury was at least bad enough for it to have to make you think twice about judging him based on this past season’s jumper.

      I have no explanation for why he was so poor near the basket. 53% in close? Ouch.

    9. Frank

      Brian Cronin: No doubt. But it is one thing to have the data and it is a whole other thing to convince players to change their habits based on the data.

      If anything it might give players some idea of which parts of their game they need to work on in the offseason. Amare shooting 16% from that spot is ridiculous given that he shot so much from there. And my guess is that he will be shooting more mid-long range 2s from this point forward in his career, so he better practice it!

    10. TelegraphedPass

      Frank: More great stuff from courtvisionanalytics:http://courtvisionanalytics.com/the-alignment-of-carmelo-anthony/Re: Carmelo.

      Really interesting, right? I was talkin bout that a couple threads ago.

      I’ve been pretty vocal in defense of Carmelo but this was still shocking to me. His shot selection relative to his hotspots is superior to much better offensive players like Kevin Durant.

      We typically call the long 2 the least efficient shot in basketball, but we should eventually realize that there is some room for variation based on player talents. Melo is better at converting that shot than most in the league.

      Here’s a hilarious comparison: A Melo long 2 is statistically about as good a shot as a Ricky Rubio layup.

    11. Frank

      you know, if Melo is so good from mid-range (and presumably many of those are of the contested variety), you would think he should be a lot better from 3 point range, where many fewer of them would be contested. You would think that it should just be a matter of practice – I wonder whether it was injuries this year? If he could shoot high 30s from 3 point range it would transform his game (and our team).

    12. TelegraphedPass

      Frank: you know, if Melo is so good from mid-range (and presumably many of those are of the contested variety), you would think he should be a lot better from 3 point range, where many fewer of them would be contested. You would think that it should just be a matter of practice – I wonder whether it was injuries this year? If he could shoot high 30s from 3 point range it would transform his game (and our team).

      I don’t think it’s that simple. Those shots are less contested, but they’re more difficult shots.

      And I doubt he’ll ever be a great 3 point shooter. It’s never been a dominant part of his game, and he’s prone to heat checks.

    13. Brian Cronin

      you know, if Melo is so good from mid-range (and presumably many of those are of the contested variety), you would think he should be a lot better from 3 point range, where many fewer of them would be contested. You would think that it should just be a matter of practice – I wonder whether it was injuries this year? If he could shoot high 30s from 3 point range it would transform his game (and our team).

      Yeah, I don’t get why he is not a better three point shooter. Heck, I don’t get why he doesn’t shoot the three more period. Part of his excellence in 2011 was that he shot the three ball at nearly double the rate he was shooting it in Denver. Then he regressed by nearly a three a game this season. That’s what I mean about how the data is one thing, getting the players to use it is another. You’d think every midrange player would realize the importance of the three ball by now. And yet…

    14. Nick C.

      TelegraphedPass: Really interesting, right? I was talkin bout that a couple threads ago.I’ve been pretty vocal in defense of Carmelo but this was still shocking to me. His shot selection relative to his hotspots is superior to much better offensive players like Kevin Durant. We typically call the long 2 the least efficient shot in basketball, but we should eventually realize that there is some room for variation based on player talents. Melo is better at converting that shot than most in the league.Here’s a hilarious comparison: A Melo long 2 is statistically about as good a shot as a Ricky Rubio layup.

      In a way that datea is good, but in a way, not so good. If he is already shooting the most from his most effective areas then he is at maximum efficiency in that regard. So he can’t, like say Josh Smith the one year, stop shooting threes or some other shot because he sucks at them and have his %s rise as a result. The % around the basket was shockingly low.

    15. ephus

      A big part of the issue with ‘Melo and 3 point shots is on-the-ball vs. off-the-ball. It’s really unlikely for anyone to be a good 3 point shooter off of the dribble. It’s particularly unlikely for anyone to be a good 3 point shooter on a steady diet of step back shots. But the rest of ‘Melo’s offensive game depends on him catching the ball at the elbow (or deeper).

      If Lin brings the PnR game back, it makes sense to have ‘Melo space the floor by camping outside the arc for the penetration and kick out. But, to keep ‘Melo engaged, there has to be plans for secondary action to get him involved if the initial PnR does not develop. ‘Melo camping outside the arc when the offense is not working gets coaches fired.

    16. johnlocke

      Yeh the at the rim % seems to highlight relative lack of athleticism / being in better shape. He was getting his shot blocked at the rim way too often, esp earlier in the season. Also shooting it at 30% outside the lane is just inexplicable…I guess those shots are more contested?

      Nick C.: In a way that datea is good, but in a way, not so good. If he is already shooting the most from his most effective areas then he is at maximum efficiency in that regard.So he can’t, like say Josh Smith the one year, stop shooting threes or some other shot because he sucks at them and have his %s rise as a result. The % around the basket was shockingly low.

    17. Frank

      Nick C.: In a way that datea is good, but in a way, not so good. If he is already shooting the most from his most effective areas then he is at maximum efficiency in that regard.So he can’t, like say Josh Smith the one year, stop shooting threes or some other shot because he sucks at them and have his %s rise as a result. The % around the basket was shockingly low.

      He may be shooting at the best spots on him within each “zone” (ie. he takes most of his mid-range shots from the right side), but he can still redistribute his total shots taken PER zone – ie. rather than taking an equal # of shots at the rim and from 16-23 feet (~6 per game each), he could take 7 at the rim and 5 from 16-23, or increase the # of 3 pointers taken. Obviously these things don’t occur in a vacuum and it’s easier said than done to “create” shots in different distributions, but that’s how he could still improve his overall efficiency.

      He definitely has to improve his 3 point shooting, especially if Novak and/or JR leave and we have a total dearth of shooting.

    18. Frank

      johnlocke:
      Yeh the at the rim % seems to highlight relative lack of athleticism / being in better shape.He was getting his shot blocked at the rim way too often, esp earlier in the season. Also shooting it at 30% outside the lane is just inexplicable…I guess those shots are more contested?

      would be interesting to see his PPP at the rim as opposed to pure FG%. He seems to volleyball it a lot there on his O-rebounds (I remember at least a few occasions during which he tipped the ball 3 or 4 times before getting it to go in), which decreases his FG% but wouldn’t change his PPP since O-rebounds don’t count as extra possessions.

    19. TelegraphedPass

      johnlocke: Yeh the at the rim % seems to highlight relative lack of athleticism / being in better shape. He was getting his shot blocked at the rim way too often, esp earlier in the season. Also shooting it at 30% outside the lane is just inexplicable…I guess those shots are more contested?

      Most people suck at that shot. Goldberry himself said that spot is pretty much reserved for Chris Bosh and Tim Duncan, since those two are the only guys who consistently year-after-year shoot a solid volume from that spot and nail them.

    20. johnlocke

      http://courtvisionanalytics.com/breaking-down-chris-paul/

      People don’t realize how good of a shooter Chris Paul is. Look at Chris Paul’s shot % at every area of the floor….insane. He only shoots below 40% from 2 areas on the floor (collectively less than 10% of the shots he takes). Damn.

      By the way this data supports the idea that Melo is a great mid-range scorer, but definitely not the most versatile scorer in the NBA…he can score from a lot of places but his efficiency has dramatic shifts based on where he’s shooting from. He shoots below 40% from 9 of 17 areas on the floor. Crazy.

    21. TelegraphedPass

      johnlocke: http://courtvisionanalytics.com/breaking-down-chris-paul/People don’t realize how good of a shooter Chris Paul is. Look at Chris Paul’s shot % at every area of the floor….insane. He only shoots below 40% from 2 areas on the floor (collectively less than 10% of the shots he takes). Damn. By the way this data supports the idea that Melo is a great mid-range scorer, but definitely not the most versatile scorer in the NBA…he can score from a lot of places but his efficiency has dramatic shifts based on where he’s shooting from. He shoots below 40% from 9 of 17 areas on the floor. Crazy.

      Not exactly the point though. The reason people call him a great scorer is cuz of his versatility, not his dominance from all parts of the floor. He’s a great threat from the post, in isolation, off the dribble, spotting up, in transition, and pretty much any situation you can imagine.

    22. johnlocke

      Yeh I guess versatility is overrated. People were bashing Lebron and Durant for not having a post game, so they’re less versatile but far more efficient. I’d take greater efficiency over versatility, for similar usage players, every day of the week. Most of the best wing players in the NBA can score in isolation, off the dribble, spotting up and in transition – although some post up better than others — but what matters to me is the expected production rate from the end result – shooting.

      TelegraphedPass: Not exactly the point though. The reason people call him a great scorer is cuz of his versatility, not his dominance from all parts of the floor. He’s a great threat from the post, in isolation, off the dribble, spotting up, in transition, and pretty much any situation you can imagine.

    23. TelegraphedPass

      johnlocke: Yeh I guess versatility is overrated. People were bashing Lebron and Durant for not having a post game, so they’re less versatile but far more efficient. I’d take greater efficiency over versatility, for similar usage players, every day of the week. Most of the best wing players in the NBA can score in isolation, off the dribble, spotting up and in transition – although some post up better than others — but what matters to me is the expected production rate from the end result – shooting.

      Agreed. The versatility does help add variance to the offense, but I’d rather have someone excellent at something more specific in a vacuum.

    24. Owen

      Yes, the “great threat” argument. Never understood it. There are a lot of players in the nba who are considered greater threats than others despite the fact they are far less efficient on similar usage. Usually that distinction boils down I think to making higher degree of difficulty shots more frequently, which is a bad thing, in that you should avoid such shots if at all if possible, but which looks like a great thing to the casual fan, since you are salvaging possessions which seemed lost, and you are watching it on sports center.

      To me, all this granular data is great but I wonder how effectively people will be able to use it. We shall see….

      TelegraphedPass: Not exactly the point though. The reason people call him a great scorer is cuz of his versatility, not his dominance from all parts of the floor. He’s a great threat from the post, in isolation, off the dribble, spotting up, in transition, and pretty much any situation you can imagine.

    25. TelegraphedPass

      Owen: Yes, the “great threat” argument. Never understood it. There are a lot of players in the nba who are considered greater threats than others despite the fact they are far less efficient on similar usage. Usually that distinction boils down I think to making higher degree of difficulty shots more frequently, which is a bad thing, in that you should avoid such shots if at all if possible, but which looks like a great thing to the casual fan, since you are salvaging possessions which seemed lost, and you are watching it on sports center.To me, all this granular data is great but I wonder how effectively people will be able to use it. We shall see….

      Not sure what you’re saying here, Owen. Statistics support Melo typically being strong in all those areas. Not just “flashy” but efficient. It has little to do with degree of difficulty. I think you’re overreacting a bit here, and generalizing.

    26. thenamestsam

      I think versatility may be overrated at times, but if you’re only good at one specific thing you better be really freaking good at that thing, because if you’re not versatile it becomes a lot easier for defenses to take away the thing you do well. Look at what the Heat did to Novak. He might be the least versatile offensive player I’ve ever seen. He can only shoot standing still jumpers. He can’t cut. He can’t dribble. he can’t post. He can’t shoot on the move. He does exactly one thing, but he does it very well. The problem is that a well-coached team can really overplay that one thing, like the Heat did, and unless you have at least some versatility, you have no counter. If Novak had even the slightest threat of driving, or even driving two steps and pulling up for a jumper, the Heat couldn’t have closed out on him the way they did, but as it was, they made it impossible for him to use his one skill.

      So I think it’s true that at some point versatility ceases to have much value. There is a lot of diminishing marginal returns there at some value. But it does have real value, especially when you’re comparing low versatility players to medium versatility players.

    27. ruruland

      Owen:
      Yes, the “great threat” argument. Never understood it. There are a lot of players in the nba who are considered greater threats than others despite the fact they are far less efficient on similar usage. Usually that distinction boils down I think to making higher degree of difficulty shots more frequently, which is a bad thing, in that you should avoid such shots if at all if possible, but which looks like a great thing to the casual fan, since you are salvaging possessions which seemed lost, and you are watching it on sports center.

      To me, all this granular data is great but I wonder how effectively people will be able to use it. We shall see….

      This is quite funny.

    28. johnlocke

      Yes, agreed with all that. However, my note was regarding players with “similar usage rates” which usually eliminates catch-and-shoot players and my larger point was regarding being efficient from many places on the floor being more important than the ability to ‘threaten the defense’ based on versatility. Novak is efficient from the 3 pt line and is low usage, he doesn’t fit the criteria, regarding my post above.

      thenamestsam:
      I think versatility may be overrated at times, but if you’re only good at one specific thing you better be really freaking good at that thing, because if you’re not versatile it becomes a lot easier for defenses to take away the thing you do well. Look at what the Heat did to Novak. He might be the least versatile offensive player I’ve ever seen. He can only shoot standing still jumpers. He can’t cut. He can’t dribble. he can’t post. He can’t shoot on the move. He does exactly one thing, but he does it very well. The problem is that a well-coached team can really overplay that one thing, like the Heat did, and unless you have at least some versatility, you have no counter. If Novak had even the slightest threat of driving, or even driving two steps and pulling up for a jumper, the Heat couldn’t have closed out on him the way they did, but as it was, they made it impossible for him to use his one skill.

      So I think it’s true that at some point versatility ceases to have much value. There is a lot of diminishing marginal returns there at some value. But it does have real value, especially when you’re comparing low versatility players to medium versatility players.

    29. TelegraphedPass

      johnlocke: Yes, agreed with all that. However, my note was regarding players with “similar usage rates” which usually eliminates catch-and-shoot players and my larger point was regarding being efficient from many places on the floor being more important than the ability to ‘threaten the defense’ based on versatility. Novak is efficient from the 3 pt line and is low usage, he doesn’t fit the criteria, regarding my post above.

      What evidence do you have, though, that being more effective from greater range on the floor is more valuable than being more effective in more situations? If someone is a skilled post player from the 3 spot, like Carmelo, and efficient there, isn’t that just as valuable as being a good shooter from the left elbow?

    30. ruruland

      johnlocke:
      http://courtvisionanalytics.com/breaking-down-chris-paul/

      People don’t realize how good of a shooter Chris Paul is. Look at Chris Paul’s shot % at every area of the floor….insane. He only shoots below 40% from 2 areas on the floor (collectively less than 10% of the shots he takes). Damn.

      By the way this data supports the idea that Melo is a great mid-range scorer, but definitely not the most versatile scorer in the NBA…he can score from a lot of places but his efficiency has dramatic shifts based on where he’s shooting from.He shoots below 40% from 9 of 17 areas on the floor.Crazy.

      Remember, that is this year’s sample. He had the worst offensive year of his career this year (the 19-20 year old Melo had not developed).

      Those won’t be the numbers next year, I can absolutely guarantee that.

    31. thenamestsam

      Anyway to bring this back to more tangible, less theoretical basketball, I think Odom is an interesting player and one I definitely think the Knicks should pursue if he’s really interested in coming here. It’s hard to say exactly how he would fit into the Knicks scheme offensively since I think that scheme is pretty undefined right now, but one of Odom’s biggest strengths is his versatility, and I like the fact that he could provide some floor spacing and passing from the 4 position. Having said that, I wouldn’t offer him any more than the BAE. He was terrible this year and he has a lot to prove.

    32. TelegraphedPass

      thenamestsam: Anyway to bring this back to more tangible, less theoretical basketball, I think Odom is an interesting player and one I definitely think the Knicks should pursue if he’s really interested in coming here. It’s hard to say exactly how he would fit into the Knicks scheme offensively since I think that scheme is pretty undefined right now, but one of Odom’s biggest strengths is his versatility, and I like the fact that he could provide some floor spacing and passing from the 4 position. Having said that, I wouldn’t offer him any more than the BAE. He was terrible this year and he has a lot to prove.

      Would you rather have Odom or JR Smith? If we were so lucky as to be able to choose between the two Sixth Men.

    33. ruruland

      Brian Cronin: Yeah, I don’t get why he is not a better three point shooter. Heck, I don’t get why he doesn’t shoot the three more period. Part of his excellence in 2011 was that he shot the three ball at nearly double the rate he was shooting it in Denver. Then he regressed by nearly a three a game this season. That’s what I mean about how the data is one thing, getting the players to use it is another. You’d think every midrange player would realize the importance of the three ball by now. And yet…

      Melo has worked extremely hard on his 3pt shot, really since Iverson came along and he had to sort of space the floor a little bit more to get catches.

      He jumped from .268 to .354 his fifth year.

      Since then he’s been .371, .316, .378 and .335.

      Last five years: .351 (343/975)

      With the work he’s done though the last couple of years I’d expect him to go into the .375-.400 range with a pg.

    34. thenamestsam

      TelegraphedPass: Would you rather have Odom or JR Smith? If we were so lucky as to be able to choose between the two Sixth Men.

      Tough choice, but I think Odom. Lin and Shump are going to be the starters moving forwards, and I still think it’s fairly likely that either Toney or Fields will rediscover their shot and turn into a serviceable guard off the bench. I think the more urgent need for depth is in the front court. I’m worried about Amare’s health and quality going forward, and off the bench we have Jorts I guess, and he showed flashes this year, but I’m not sold on him as anything more than a 12th man type going forward.

      It depends what else they do this offseason though obviously. They have to find some 3 pt shooting somewhere, so unless they can get some for the minimum it may be critical to spend the BAE on someone who can shoot the 3.

    35. Owen

      “The problem is that a well-coached team can really overplay that one thing, like the Heat did, and unless you have at least some versatility, you have no counter.”

      Novak was bad. But it’s interesting no one gives him any credit for drawing the defense. The Heat clearly were focused on denying Novak whenever he was in the game. Which presumably should have opened things up for everyone else. Except it didn’t or they couldn’t take advantage.

      I don’t know, people are very selective about who they credit with those kinds of less tangible impacts. Role players rarely get that bump.

      “Not sure what you’re saying here, Owen. Statistics support Melo typically being strong in all those areas. Not just “flashy” but efficient. It has little to do with degree of difficulty. I think you’re overreacting a bit here, and generalizing.”

      They don’t actually support that. And I stand by my statement. I think Melo gets a lot of credit for being a great scorer because he makes a lot of very difficult shots. But the reality is that he isn’t an elite offensive option overall like a Lebron, Durant, or Love. He just isn’t efficient enough. Which I have said umpteen times I know.

      Every great scorer does it a different way, but I think it’s not that hard to understand why Melo falls short. He doesn’t shoot the three well. He doesn’t shoot above 85% from the line. And he isn’t athletic and skilled enough in transition to generate easy buckets for himself. That’s the low hanging fruit in the NBA.

      He also doesn’t consistently scrap inside because, as good as he can be there, I don’t think he can take the punishment day in and day out.

      Which is why his default is mid range shooting, which he is ok at, but which overall is a tough way to make a living in the NBA….

    36. johnlocke

      True, hoping so too.

      ruruland: Remember, that is this year’s sample. He had the worst offensive year of his career this year (the 19-20 year old Melo had not developed).

      Those won’t be the numbers next year, I can absolutely guarantee that.

    37. johnlocke

      I’m not sure I understand your question.
      The point is that if you are a better shooter from more areas than someone else, unless there efficiency is off the charts in the area in which they’re strong (mid-range shooting for Melo) you won’t be as effective…that’s just straightforward logic

      TelegraphedPass: What evidence do you have, though, that being more effective from greater range on the floor is more valuable than being more effective in more situations? If someone is a skilled post player from the 3 spot, like Carmelo, and efficient there, isn’t that just as valuable as being a good shooter from the left elbow?

    38. TelegraphedPass

      johnlocke: I’m not sure I understand your question.The point is that if you are a better shooter from more areas than someone else, unless there efficiency is off the charts in the area in which they’re strong (mid-range shooting for Melo) you won’t be as effective…that’s just straightforward logic

      I suppose what I’m saying is better explained through example.

      Dwight Howard, by most accounts an excellent offensive option, can’t really score outside of the paint (duh, right?). He generates over 50% of his looks in the post. His PPP in the post of .88 is inferior to scoring in the post (.94), spotting up (.91), and as the PnR ball handler (.97).

      These splits aren’t shown particularly well through shot charts, but it shows that Melo is efficient even in a down year in many different situations. If his poor iso scoring (.85) was closer to his iso scoring of previous seasons (between .9 and 1), then he would likely have been a more efficient scorer than Dwight.

      I guess my point is that shot charts don’t tell the whole story on player efficiency, especially because players don’t need to score from every location on the floor well to be good scorers. I like to look at situational splits too, among other things.

    39. ruruland

      Owen:
      If Danilo Gallinari is a “great” 3pt shooter as you’ve said many times on this board, Melo is good.

      In fact, .351 (over the last 5 years) is above league average and median.

      Let me ask you this, Owen, how do you think Melo used to get 60% assisted baskets and 40-43% of his shot attempts in the first 10 seconds of the clock, 60-70% assisted?

      it’s true he is not as dynamic as Wade or Lebron in transition, or Durant for that matter (at times he is amazing in that area), but he when he played with point guards (not the plodding Chauncey Billups) he was quite explosive in that area of the game.

      Quite dynamic, as well, with his inside out-moves, strength, ability to get early post-ups even when a defender was back — plus he can play the trailer.

      James Worthy or Shawn Marion certainly wouldn’t have been amazing transition players if they had Toney Douglas or Mike Bibby trying to push the ball.

      Melo has the ability to get himself transition baskets as a ball-handler on occasion, but he was once a lethal weapon running the wing on fast-paced teams. That WILL happen again with Lin.

    40. Frank

      @40 – I think we saw in a couple of the Miami games that Melo can get out in transition very well when he wants to. And he’s very very effective – if you look at Synergy stats, Melo and Durant basically have the same PPP (1.3) on transition possessions. BUT– Durant had more than DOUBLE (~270 vs. ~130) the number of transition possessions as Melo did. Some of that maybe is the fact that OKC runs more (then had about 200 more transition possessions than we did even though we had basically the same pace – 93.2 vs 93 – and that we forced a lot more turnovers than OKC did). Some of the difference is maybe a PG thing. But I would also wager that Melo just doesn’t run out as much or as hard as KD or LBJ/Wade do. I’m not sure if that’s just him not being told to run out, or whether he’s tired and doesn’t run hard all the time. Maybe that’s what Woodson meant when he said he had to come out in better shape.

    41. ruruland

      Well, only 42 % of Melo’s baskets in the first 10 seconds were assisted. For Durant it’s 54%. I would wager that there’s an even higher discrepancy between pure transition baskets and #of assisted baskets.

      The vast majority of transition baskets for both guys will be assisted or close to assisted (come at 3 dribbles instead of two).

      When Lin was playing Melo was running. The Knicks played at a fast pace but were an absolutely brutal transition team…

    42. TelegraphedPass

      Carmelo Anthony and Tyson Chandler were named to the All-NBA Third team. Whether or not you agree that they deserved the honors, let’s still send congratulations over the high honor!

    43. Owen

      Wow. I just read that the Steinbrenner’s saved an estimated 500 million because George died in 2010 when the estate tax had lapsed. Pretty amazing actually. Kind of ironic too given all the tax breaks that went into building Yankee stadium….

      There is a difference between being good in transition with the ball, like Lebron, and running the break alongside a great point guard. Anyone is capable of doing the latter. Few forwards can do the former.

      Look, I will be happier than you Ruru if Melo comes out and posts a career high in efficiency next year. It will make the year a lot more fun than I am currently expecting it to be.

    44. thenamestsam

      TelegraphedPass:
      Carmelo Anthony and Tyson Chandler were named to the All-NBA Third team. Whether or not you agree that they deserved the honors, let’s still send congratulations over the high honor!

      Yup. Very happy for both guys. Melo’s selection is pretty generous in my mind. More reflective of his reputation and the way he played at the end of the season than of his overall body of work, but the other guys in contention for the spot in my mind (Pierce, Deng, Igoudala) have flaws too, so I can’t quibble too much . And besides it’s always better when it’s your guy getting the undeserved honor than someone else. Forward especially seems a little shallow this year. Griffin didn’t feel worth of 2nd team to me either but I can’t come up with someone who deserved it over him.

    45. thenamestsam

      Just looked at the overall list and realized I left Aldridge, Smith and KG off my list of deserving guys. I thought Smith had a great year. He deserved to be in there over Melo, as did KG in my opinion for his effect on the defensive end (although he’s really a center now, not a forward).

    46. ephus

      Frank: But I would also wager that Melo just doesn’t run out as much or as hard as KD or LBJ/Wade do. I’m not sure if that’s just him not being told to run out, or whether he’s tired and doesn’t run hard all the time. Maybe that’s what Woodson meant when he said he had to come out in better shape.

      This. +1.

      If Carmelo can get 2 extra transition attempts at the rim per game — keeping all else constant — it will make up for a multitude of sins.

    47. nicos

      Owen:

      Novak was bad. But it’s interesting no one gives him any credit for drawing the defense. The Heat clearly were focused on denying Novak whenever he was in the game. Which presumably should have opened things up for everyone else. Except it didn’t or they couldn’t take advantage.

      The problem was that they did cheat off of him and drop into the lane but were super quick to recover. Novak got plenty of catches but always had a guy sprinting straight at him. If he could have taken one or two dribbles and hit an 18 footer they might have really had to stay home on him which would have made a huge difference for the Knicks offense.

    48. TelegraphedPass

      thenamestsam: Just looked at the overall list and realized I left Aldridge, Smith and KG off my list of deserving guys. I thought Smith had a great year. He deserved to be in there over Melo, as did KG in my opinion for his effect on the defensive end (although he’s really a center now, not a forward).

      Disagree on J-Smoove. He was a less efficient offensive player, and not quite superior enough defensively to make up for it. Aldridge was completely overlooked due to the utter collapse of the Blazers, but he was superb this season. I hate Garnett, so I won’t publicly agree on that one.

    49. ruruland

      Owen:

      There is a difference between being good in transition with the ball, like Lebron, and running the break alongside a great point guard. Anyone is capable of doing the latter. Few forwards can do the former.

      Look, I will be happier than you Ruru if Melo comes out and posts a career high in efficiency next year. It will make the year a lot more fun than I am currently expecting it to be.

      Anyone? James Worthy? Shawn Marion?

      I think Gallo is solid in transition, and it actually has a great deal to do with his efficiency (can you verify, Frank?) is he an anyone to you?

      Look, we’re not talking about GREAT point guards, we’re talking about guys who can occasionally push the ball ahead with their passing or dribbling — the great Anthony Carter excelled at this. Andre Miller has been the best pass-ahead guy in the NBA for years.

    50. ruruland

      nicos: The problem was that they did cheat off of him and drop into the lane but were super quick to recover.Novak got plenty of catches but always had a guy sprinting straight at him.If he could have taken one or two dribbles and hit an 18 footer they might have really had to stay home on him which would have made a huge difference for the Knicks offense.

      Owen is actually correct on this though, shocking i know. Had the Knicks had more ability to penetrate, they would not have been able to help off Novak, and the could have helped those kinds of plays Now, the funny thing is that you can literally defend Novak with any kind of player — that doesn’t help your offense at all. He can be defended by the opponent’s worst defender at all times because he is probably the most limited 3pt shooter in the NBA, maybe ever.

      But he’ll never be a guy you can help off, which is good for spacing, not good when he has the ball in his hands.

    51. nicos

      ruruland: Melo has worked extremely hard on his 3pt shot, really since Iverson came along and he had to sort of space the floor a little bit more to get catches.

      He jumped from .268 to .354 his fifth year.

      Since then he’s been .371, .316, .378 and .335.

      Last five years: .351 (343/975)

      With the work he’s done though the last couple of years I’d expect him to go into the .375-.400 range with a pg.

      The problem is he’s really streaky out there- at least the last two years. He shot a mediocre .333 for Denver last year before shooting a great .424 for the Knicks. This year through March he was an awful .294 but salvaged his numbers somewhat by shooting an amazing .460 in April. And that had nothing to do with a penetrating point guard as he did much better with Davis- who doesn’t penetrate and kick all that much anymore- than he did with Lin. Clearly the potential is there for a 40% season- he just needs to be more consistent.

    52. ruruland

      Owen:

      Look, I will be happier than you Ruru if Melo comes out and posts a career high in efficiency next year.

      Right, you could hardly contain your joy when Melo was posting 600 TS and carrying teams to wins in April.

      I have this odd feeling that if Melo posts a great year you’re going to be talking about his aggregate career numbers a lot more, how he’s bound to regress blah blah.

    53. ruruland

      nicos: The problem is he’s really streaky out there- at least the last two years.He shot a mediocre .333 for Denver last year before shooting a great .424 for the Knicks.This year through March he was an awful .294 but salvaged his numbers somewhat by shooting an amazing .460 in April. And that had nothing to do with a penetrating point guard as he did much better with Davis- who doesn’t penetrate and kick all that much anymore- than he did with Lin.Clearly the potential is there for a 40% season- he just needs to be more consistent.

      I agree. There is no real correlation between his 3pt shooting and assisted basket rates over the last 5 years — he has simply been erratic. I just happen to think that there’s a longer term trend that I think should start to consistently push him into the .370s or above area, simply because he’s spent so much time shooting those shots over the years — hundreds of hours.

      He’s actually changed his form and balance on those shots a lot– the result of a lot of hard work (he used to fade or finish to the sides). Staying on balance is the biggest key to his consistency.

    54. TelegraphedPass

      ruruland: He’s actually changed his form and balance on those shots a lot– the result of a lot of hard work (he used to fade or finish to the sides). Staying on balance is the biggest key to his consistency.

      I remember Carmelo has always had a natural fade on his jumpshot (partly why he’s such a tough guard from midrange) but I felt like it has seriously lessened over the years. Probably a good thing; I know LeBron came into the league with the same type of issue with his shot.

      Melo still shoots off-balance more than he probably should (I remember even in the playoffs he knocked down a couple jumpers while doing what seemed to be a split in the air) but hopefully he can continue to streamline his base. His upper-body form is phenomenal.

    55. ruruland

      TelegraphedPass: I remember Carmelo has always had a natural fade on his jumpshot (partly why he’s such a tough guard from midrange) but I felt like it has seriously lessened over the years. Probably a good thing; I know LeBron came into the league with the same type of issue with his shot.

      Melo still shoots off-balance more than he probably should (I remember even in the playoffs he knocked down a couple jumpers while doing what seemed to be a split in the air) but hopefully he can continue to streamline his base. His upper-body form is phenomenal.

      yep. Lebron was really bad, probably worse.

    56. nicos

      ruruland: Owen is actually correct on this though, shocking i know. Had the Knicks had more ability to penetrate, they would not have been able to help off Novak, and the could have helped those kinds of plays Now, the funny thing is that you can literally defend Novak with any kind of player — that doesn’t help your offense at all. He can be defended by the opponent’s worst defender at all times because he is probably the most limited 3pt shooter in the NBA, maybe ever.

      But he’ll never be a guy you can help off, which is good for spacing, not good when he has the ball in his hands.

      Oh, I agree that if the Knicks could have gotten more penetration they would have had to stay at home on Novak- my point was that as it was, they didn’t stay at home him enough to really spread the floor because they recovered so well. Did they stay closer to him on the perimeter than they did to Fields? Sure, but not enough keep guys from dropping down to bother Melo on the catch or to flash in and disrupt the pnr. Of course the Heat are one of the few teams that have multiple perimeter defenders who can make those kind of close outs- if the Knicks had been playing anyone else in the East besides maybe Philly, Novak would have gotten a lot more shots up.

    57. Frank

      ruruland: I think Gallo is solid in transition, and it actually has a great deal to do with his efficiency (can you verify, Frank?) is he an anyone to you?

      Actually Gallo was pretty horrible this year in transition with a PPP of only 1.01. He was especially horrible from 3 point range – 21% on 38 shots. He was better in 10-11 with Denver (1.19 PPP but the sample size was small at only 54 possessions) and with us (1.21 PPP on 118 possessions).

      btw – I just realized the problem with my saying that Melo didn’t run out as much as Durant etc. Melo missed a whole bunch of games this year whereas Durant basically didn’t miss any, and we’re talking in totals here, not poss/game or other normalized stat. So overall the numbers still probably say that Durant scores a lot more in transition, but it’s not quite as dramatic a difference as at first glance.

    58. ruruland

      Frank: Actually Gallo was pretty horrible this year in transition with a PPP of only 1.01.He was especially horrible from 3 point range – 21% on 38 shots. He was better in 10-11 with Denver (1.19 PPP but the sample size was small at only 54 possessions) and with us (1.21 PPP on 118 possessions).

      btw – I just realized the problem with my saying that Melo didn’t run out as much as Durant etc. Melo missed a whole bunch of games this year whereas Durant basically didn’t miss any, and we’re talking in totals here, not poss/game or other normalized stat.So overall the numbers still probably say that Durant scores a lot more in transition, but it’s not quite as dramatic a difference as at first glance.

      Interesting. how many attempts did he have overal? ANy way you could post his numbers from different shot categories from the last few years (just let me know if I’m being a pest here).

      it seems like he gets a ton of transition basket opportunities in relation to his total shots. the 3 point transition shot should be much better for him.

    59. ruruland

      nicos: Oh, I agree that if the Knicks could have gotten more penetration they would have had to stay at home on Novak- my point was that as it was, they didn’t stay at home him enough to really spread the floor because they recovered so well.Did they stay closer to him on the perimeter than they did to Fields? Sure, but not enough keep guys from dropping down to bother Melo on the catch or to flash in and disrupt the pnr.Of course the Heat are one of the few teams that have multiple perimeter defenders who can make those kind of close outs- if the Knicks had been playing anyone else in the East besides maybe Philly, Novak would have gotten a lot more shots up.

      Yeah, but that’s true when Novak was in the corner. they tried to put him in the opposite wing — so the effect really wasn’t there anyway. .

    60. Frank

      ruruland: Interesting. how many attempts did he have overal? ANy way you could post his numbers from different shot categories from the last few years (just let me know if I’m being a pest here).

      18% (134 transition out of 743 total) of his possessions were in transition which seems like a lot (his 3rd highest % after iso and spot-up, in that order). In comparison, Durant only had 13.8% transition. Lebron also had 18.8% in transition. LBJ shot 74% (!!!!) from the floor in transition.

    61. thenamestsam

      TelegraphedPass: Disagree on J-Smoove. He was a less efficient offensive player, and not quite superior enough defensively to make up for it. Aldridge was completely overlooked due to the utter collapse of the Blazers, but he was superb this season. I hate Garnett, so I won’t publicly agree on that one.

      Hate Garnett too, but his consistency in terms of bringing it every night was laudable in a season where so many other guys (Melo included) were so inconsistent. To me Smith’s defense is enough to make up the difference on offense, but I don’t think it’s one-sided or anything like that. If it’s close I generally prefer to see it go to a guy who had the best season of his career than someone who underachieved somewhat, but it’s again a minor quibble and I’m happy for Melo.

    62. ruruland

      Frank: 18% (134 transition out of 743 total) of his possessions were in transition which seems like a lot (his 3rd highest % after iso and spot-up, in that order).In comparison, Durant only had 13.8% transition. Lebron also had 18.8% in transition. LBJ shot 74% (!!!!) from the floor in transition.

      great stuff Frank.
      Damn, 18%, that was sort of my hunch. He wasn’t getting those leak-out looks in the playoffs which is part of why he struggled so much.

      it looks like Melo was around 12%, is that right?

    63. ruruland

      Oh, maybe I’m wrong, what percent of Melo’s possessions came in transition? Looks like it might be under 10 percent.

    64. ruruland

      thenamestsam: Hate Garnett too, but his consistency in terms of bringing it every night was laudable in a season where so many other guys (Melo included) were so inconsistent. To me Smith’s defense is enough to make up the difference on offense, but I don’t think it’s one-sided or anything like that. If it’s close I generally prefer to see itgo to a guy who had the best season of his career than someone who underachieved somewhat, but it’s again a minor quibble and I’m happy for Melo.

      I think Melo would even say that Smith was better this year– really underrated passer who sometimes looks like Lamar Odom.

    65. ruruland

      Smith is a guy who get absolutely punished by advanced stats for his inefficient shooting. But again, much of that is the product of how their offense works — it works better when he can space the floor some and he has to shoot jumpers for opponents to respect his playmaking.

      if he played on a team with more playmakign where that wasn’t his role, his efficiency would skyrocket. He’s never played with a decent penetrating point guard or running and passing pg.

      No way is Smith a league average player as indicated by his career .102 Ws/48.

    66. Owen

      Look, if Future Melo were to come out next year and put up a .220 ws48 and post a top 10 Win Share total in the NBA do you think I wouldn’t give him his due? Do you think I wouldn’t be ecstatic?

      The Knicks would be contenders and my faith in advanced stats would be confirmed. Win win.

      That’s the kind of egg I would love to have on my face.

      Honestly, it would be truly amazing if he were nestled next to Paul, Durant and Lebron in the end of season rankings next year rather than Thaddeus Young.

      The difference between you and me is that I hope it happens. while you on the other hand are sure it will happen. Or sure that if it doesn’t happen, it’s because of some rip in the fabric of the universe.

      ruruland: Right, you could hardly contain your joy when Melo was posting 600 TS and carrying teams to wins in April.

      I have this odd feeling that if Melo posts a great year you’re going to be talking about his aggregate career numbers a lot more, how he’s bound to regress blah blah.

    67. ruruland

      Owen:
      Look, if Future Melo were to come out next year and put up a .220 ws48 and post a top 10 Win Share total in the NBA do you think I wouldn’t give him his due? Do you think I wouldn’t be ecstatic?

      The Knicks would be contenders and my faith in advanced stats would be confirmed. Win win.

      That’s the kind of egg I would love to have on my face.

      Honestly, it would be truly amazing if he were nestled next to Paul, Durant and Lebron in the end of season rankings next year rather than Thaddeus Young.

      The difference between you and me is that I hope it happens. while You on the other hand are sure it will happen. Or sure that if it does happen, it’s because of some rip in the fabric of the universe.

      haha, I liked that last line.

      Look, what is the WS/48 that would satisfy you as a fan?

    68. ess-dog

      Frank: 18% (134 transition out of 743 total) of his possessions were in transition which seems like a lot (his 3rd highest % after iso and spot-up, in that order).In comparison, Durant only had 13.8% transition. Lebron also had 18.8% in transition. LBJ shot 74% (!!!!) from the floor in transition.

      This is why Walsh wanted to marry LBJ and D’Antoni. I still think that would’ve been tremendous to watch.

    69. Owen

      If he were to put up a .200 ws.48 I would be happy and if he put up a .225 I would be incoherently delighted. That’s the standard generally for a top 10 season every year.

      How about we say 15 win shares? It’s been done 119 times in NBA history, including by Zelmo Beatty.

      That would be fantastic….

    70. formido

      I predict Carmelo won’t have a top 10 WinShares, but the Knicks will still be contenders and Melo will be a big part of the reason why.

    71. bobneptune

      Owen:
      If he were to put up a .200 ws.48 I would be happy and if he put up a .225 I would be incoherently delighted. That’s the standard generally for a top 10 season every year.

      How about we say 15 win shares? It’s been done 119 times in NBA history, including by Zelmo Beatty.

      That would be fantastic….

      zelmo beatty……

      I went to the university of utah in the early 70′s and the utah stars flew commercial at the time. I changed planes in indianapolis one day and i walk to my seat which is right in front of zelmo beatty, willie wise and ron boone sitting 3 abreast in coach. about the funniest thing i ever saw.

      The stars had the last few rows in the back of the plane booked for the flight back to salt lake.

      they had a really good team back then but had trouble getting past indiana with mel daniels, george mc ginnis and roger brown.

      My oh my how times have changed

    72. Owen

      Yeah, name to conjure with. Great story…

      bobneptune: zelmo beatty……

      I went to the university of utah in the early 70?s and the utah stars flew commercial at the time. I changed planes in indianapolis one day and i walk to my seat which is right in front of zelmo beatty, willie wise and ron boone sitting 3 abreast in coach. about the funniest thing i ever saw.

      The stars had the last few rows in the back of the plane booked for the flight back to salt lake.

      they had a really good team back then but had trouble getting past indiana with mel daniels, george mc ginnis and roger brown.

      My oh my how times have changed

    73. hoolahoop

      bobneptune: zelmo beatty……

      I went to the university of utah in the early 70?s and the utah stars flew commercial at the time. I changed planes in indianapolis one day and i walk to my seat which is right in front of zelmo beatty, willie wise and ron boone sitting 3 abreast in coach. about the funniest thing i ever saw.

      The stars had the last few rows in the back of the plane booked for the flight back to salt lake.


      My oh my how times have changed

      J. Lin, as an NBA player sent down to the D-league, was given first class seats on the chartered plane (which he often gave away to teammates).

    74. hoolahoop

      Matt Smith:
      So Odom wants to come to NY – might be worth the MLE if he’ll take it. I think it’s fair to say his drop in production last year came mostly from hating where he was.

      But I haven’t really thought of how he’d fit in with our current set up.

      Since when do the knicks consider how players will fit in with each other?

    75. hoolahoop

      Owen: Yes, the “great threat” argument. Never understood it. There are a lot of players in the nba who are considered greater threats than others despite the fact they are far less efficient on similar usage. Usually that distinction boils down I think to making higher degree of difficulty shots more frequently, which is a bad thing, in that you should avoid such shots if at all if possible, but which looks like a great thing to the casual fan, since you are salvaging possessions which seemed lost, and you are watching it on sports center.

      Great point, but I’d go further. Even die hard fans don’t get it.

    76. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      hoolahoop: Since when do the knicks consider how players will fit in with each other?

      If they did, they wouldn’t have gotten Carmelo, because he needs a great point guard to be effective. But he’s also a “shot creator,” so he doesn’t need anyone else to make the tough shots. But he needs good teammates to be All-NBA good. But he makes everyone around him better because sometimes he takes difficult shots. But he takes difficult shots because his teammates aren’t as good as him. But his teammates aren’t as good as him because they don’t exploit his talents effectively. But he can’t exploit his talents effectively for them except when he does, which is inherent in his game.

    77. hoolahoop

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: If they did, they wouldn’t have gotten Carmelo, because he needs a great point guard to be effective. But he’s also a “shot creator,” so he doesn’t need anyone else to make the tough shots. But he needs good teammates to be All-NBA good. But he makes everyone around him better because sometimes he takes difficult shots. But he takes difficult shots because his teammates aren’t as good as him. But his teammates aren’t as good as him because they don’t exploit his talents effectively. But he can’t exploit his talents effectively for them except when he does, which is inherent in his game.

      that’s great. one of the best laughs I got in this forum.

    78. Will the Thrill

      This is great. Funny stuff, and even though it is tongue-in-cheek, it is mostly true.

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: If they did, they wouldn’t have gotten Carmelo, because he needs a great point guard to be effective. But he’s also a “shot creator,” so he doesn’t need anyone else to make the tough shots. But he needs good teammates to be All-NBA good. But he makes everyone around him better because sometimes he takes difficult shots. But he takes difficult shots because his teammates aren’t as good as him. But his teammates aren’t as good as him because they don’t exploit his talents effectively. But he can’t exploit his talents effectively for them except when he does, which is inherent in his game.

    79. StatsTeacher

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: If they did, they wouldn’t have gotten Carmelo, because he needs a great point guard to be effective. But he’s also a “shot creator,” so he doesn’t need anyone else to make the tough shots. But he needs good teammates to be All-NBA good. But he makes everyone around him better because sometimes he takes difficult shots. But he takes difficult shots because his teammates aren’t as good as him. But his teammates aren’t as good as him because they don’t exploit his talents effectively. But he can’t exploit his talents effectively for them except when he does, which is inherent in his game.

      sadly, this is hilarious and true. . . . . . . . . . .

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