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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Knicks Morning News (Thursday, Jun 21 2012)

  • [New York Times] N.B.A. Finals: 2012 N.B.A. Finals — James Lives, Learns and Just Might Win (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 05:00:41 GMT)
    After last year’s disappointment in the N.B.A. finals, LeBron James has the Miami Heat one victory away from winning a championship.

  • [New York Times] On Basketball: 2012 N.B.A. Finals — LeBron James Gives Pat Riley Another Moment to Cherish (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 05:20:07 GMT)
    With LeBron James being carried off the floor and Miami’s season seeming to hang in the balance, Pat Riley was as stunned as any Heat fan. But he has lived for such moments.

  • [New York Times] Off the Dribble: For Chalmers, Echoes of a Championship Performance (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 04:59:46 GMT)
    Mario Chalmers helped lead Kansas to an N.C.A.A. title in 2008. Tuesday night’s N.B.A. finals game was reminiscent of his college days.

  • [New York Times] James, Heat on Brink of a Title (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 07:50:25 GMT)
    The only thing that can stop LeBron James’ championship coronation is another Thunder comeback.

  • [New York Times] Self-Proclaimed ‘King James’ Poised for NBA Coronation (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 00:23:42 GMT)
    LeBron James is grateful for another chance to win his first NBA title and underline his claim as the greatest basketball player in the world.

  • [New York Post] J.R. sues Chinese team to recoup $1M in fines (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 02:48:22 -0500)
    Knicks guard J.R. Smith is disputing he missed 80 practices with his Chinese team â?? virtually all of them â?? in a lawsuit filed with FIBA to recoup the $1,078,500 withheld from his salary.
    In the complaint obtained by The Post, a four-page list of other alleged transgressions depict…

  • [New York Post] Knicks not likely on Nash’s radar (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 01:42:04 -0500)
    One confidant of Steve Nash doubts the star point guard will truly give the Knicks any consideration even if they have their $5 millon mid-level exception, despite his remarks at a promotional appearance with Walt Frazier yesterday.Frazier joked at the event, “We need you to come to New York…

  • [New York Daily News] Free agent Nash would listen if Knicks called (Thu, 21 Jun 2012 01:08:20 GMT)
    If the Knicks have plans to reunite Amar’e Stoudemire with his former Phoenix Suns teammate and pick-and-roll partner Steve Nash, the 38-year-old point guard would be all ears.

  • 40 comments on “Knicks Morning News (Thursday, Jun 21 2012)

    1. thenamestsam

      To my surprise it actually does sound like Nash is seriously interested in coming here. Assuming we lose the arbitration it comes down to him vs. Lin (I can’t see how they could have space for both) and I thinkit’s a really, really tough decision. On the one hand, ditching Lin is very much the kind of decision that has typified the failure of this organization for a number of years. It’s a quick fix move that prefers the newer flashier thing over stability. It completely ignores the long-run in favor of a laser-like focus on the immediate future.

      On the other hand, it’s Steve freaking Nash. He’s not only better than Lin right now overall, but as a past-first PG and a fantastic shooter I think he’s a better fit with the other pieces already in place than Lin is. And you can make a fine argument that this team’s window (whatever your belief in the open-ness of said window) is really the next three years. As long as Nash holds up for that period you’re expecting to remodel the team at that point anyway.

      Ultimately I think it boils down to how much closer you are to a championship with Nash than with Lin. Flags really do fly forever, and if you think he makes it much more likely that you win a championship in the next couple years, I think you have to do it. Personally, I’ve been going back and forth on this with incredible frequency and I can’t say I’ve really made up my mind. It’s a really tough spot.

    2. jon abbey

      I think it’s way more likely we end up with Lin and Jason Kidd at PG next year than Nash.

      today’s Post says that Tuesday is JR Smith’s deadline for deciding whether to pick up his option or not.

    3. ephus

      On JR Smith, while it would be great if he picked up his $2.5 million option, that decision is not the end of the story. If JR does not exercise his option, the Knicks still hold his non-Bird rights and cap hold. He can be resigned for up to $2.8 million (20% increase from last year’s $2.3 million). This game will only be over once Smith signs elsewhere or the Knicks renounce his non-Bird rights.

      The big “incentive” for Smith to resign with the Knicks is that he will gain Early Bird rights for next season — a salary of up to 105% of the league average in the first year (roughly the same as the MLE) and a contract length of between two and four years. If Smith can get the MLE (or more) elsewhere this year, he would be leaving about $2.5 million on the table to resign with the Knicks, and taking the injury risk for this season.

    4. d-mar

      I think we all know unfortunately what the arbitration decision will be, but picking up Nash would be incredible for this team. With him running the show, P Jax would no longer refer to us as “clumsy”.

      On another note, I really hope OKC can push this series to six games, not just to deny the Heatles the title for one more day, but so that those awful, undeserving south Florida sports “fans” don’t get to celebrate on their home court.

    5. TelegraphedPass

      I’m also unsure about whether I would rather have Lin or Nash if forced to decide. To me, it depends on how long Nash can continue to drive into the lane and shuffle the defense. Ruru has posted some pretty compelling evidence that skilled penetrate-and-kick PGs seem to make Melo a more efficient weapon, and Lin’s driving ability may become more important to this team than Nash’s otherworldly shooting touch.

      The other important aspect of Lin’s game, his isolation scoring, could really help the team survive any injury stretches. Very few PGs seem able to contain Lin one-on-one: he’s just too big, fast, and strong. Obviously Miami has the perfect personnel to do it, but many teams would struggle to handle his ability to draw contact and finish in the paint.

      Then again, it’s Steve Nash.

      This is tough.

    6. johnlocke

      You’d rather have Lin. A defensive lineup of Nash, Stoudemire and Melo would be among the worst in the league and not fit with Woodson’s style. Nash helps Amare, but I don’t really think his game would coincide in a 1+1=3 way with Melo. Nash is a 39 yr old pt guard and Lin is 23 — while Nash is playing unbelievably and is a great shooter — it’s not a sure bet that he doesn’t a) injure his back or b) become relegated to a shooter, due to losing his first step on dribble penetration. Finally, I don’t think adding Nash and losing Lin makes us better than the Heat or Thunder. This is all an academic exercise anyway — there is NO way Dolan doesn’t resign Lin. The big keys for next season are whether Amare can get back to his career averages and Melo can have a more consistent season, if that happens and Lin has averages of 14-15 ppg and 7-8 apg, we should be in good shape.

      TelegraphedPass:
      I’m also unsure about whether I would rather have Lin or Nash if forced to decide. To me, it depends on how long Nash can continue to drive into the lane and shuffle the defense. Ruru has posted some pretty compelling evidence that skilled penetrate-and-kick PGs seem to make Melo a more efficient weapon, and Lin’s driving ability may become more important to this team than Nash’s otherworldly shooting touch.

      The other important aspect of Lin’s game, his isolation scoring, could really help the team survive any injury stretches. Very few PGs seem able to contain Lin one-on-one: he’s just too big, fast, and strong. Obviously Miami has the perfect personnel to do it, but many teams would struggle to handle his ability to draw contact and finish in the paint.

      Then again, it’s Steve Nash.

      This is tough.

    7. TelegraphedPass

      Lin needs to become a better decision maker in certain situations though. He reacts to hard hedges like Bynum reacts to double teams. Not a good thing.

    8. johnlocke

      Agreed…he was basically a rookie last year though. He has lots of room for improvement — in particular left handed penetration and finishing, shooting, decision-making in traffic and off the dribble pull-up, so he’s not always driving into the teeth of the defense…amongst others

      TelegraphedPass:
      Lin needs to become a better decision maker in certain situations though. He reacts to hard hedges like Bynum reacts to double teams. Not a good thing.

    9. JC Knickfan

      O no another Lin vs Nash discussion.

      Steve Nash has spondylolisthesis which causes muscle tightness and back pain. He does have health issues, but I think reasonable to say we could get another good year out of Nash.

      But going into 40 he touches uncharted territory at playing at same level B-ball;. Even great John Stockton stats went down at that age. So for me to choose Nash, Knicks probability winning championship next year has to significantly improve. Given Miami, OKC and even Spur will bring back same exact team, I’m pretty Vegas still put us as underdogs in 7 game series.

      Yes Lin could be flash in pan, but I would give up on him for possible one year rental.

    10. ephus

      Four reasons why the Knicks will not have Nash in place of Lin next year:

      1. Nash will get offers much higher than the MLE – which is the maximum bid the Knicks could make under any circumstances.

      2. Lin is sixteen years younger than Nash.

      3. The marketing opportunities with Lin (not just in China, but also in Chinese communities around the US) far outstrip those presented by Nash.

      4. Nash/Melo/Amar’e is difficult on defense.

      The real questions for the Knicks about Lin are:

      1. Will the Nets/Raptors make a Gilbert Arenas-rule compliant backloaded offer (5/5/13/13)? A team making that offer would need $9 million in cap space.

      2. If Lin gets that big offer, do the Knicks match?

      3. If Lin does not get the big offer from another team this off-season, does he take a huge gamble by signing his qualifiying offer, so that he will be an unrestricted free agent after next year? By foregoing about $4 million in 2012-13, Lin would open the door to a maximum offer the following year. The breakeven on this gambit is if Lin believes he would get at least $9 million/year on the open market after next season. In this world, the Knicks would have no cap space to resign Lin after next year, since they would only hold Early Bird rights.

      4. All of these questions are moot if the arbitrator grants the Knicks Early Bird rights to Lin now.

    11. thenamestsam

      Interesting note on the Lin marketing angle: JonesOnTheNBA was tweeting this morning that Lin was having some issues in his camp last year which led to him changing agents this offseason. Supposedly it was very hard to work with his camp last year which is why for as much as we’ve all talked about Lin being this marketing dynamo we haven’t really seen it take place yet. For a guy who was THE story of the sports world for a few weeks there his exposure has really fallen off a cliff since then.

      I’d link but twitter is fritzing yet again.

    12. Frank

      I think it’s a great sign that his new agent also reps guys like Shane Battier, Tim Duncan, and Grant Hill — I think these guys should also be known as guys who have said (and have actually backed it up!) they will take less money for the right situation. Battier took the mini-MLE to join Miami, and probably could’ve gotten more elsewhere. Duncan has already said he’s never leaving San Antonio, which likely means he will sign for much less than the max. And Grant Hill may have left money on the table signing with Phoenix 2 seasons ago.

      It’s also a good sign that Lin has chosen to align himself with a group like this – that temperamentally, he identifies himself with this group of players. I’m not sure we needed another CAA power player-type of guy.

    13. JC Knickfan

      Lin vs Nash is just debate at point. I would laugh if someone actually think Dolan would let GM drop Lin for Nash.

      Knicks already stated they match any offer. If team really want Lin, they would offer 1 year deal try get him sign offer sheet. Plus team get another year to see if he is the really deal. With Knicks cap out that team could steal in following year if they have cap room.

      Our GM I’m sure understand this has to get Lin to sign 2 year deal or 3 year deal with 3rd year as a player option.

    14. thenamestsam

      Okay, twitters working. Here’s what he said verbatim:

      “SMH. Lin switched agents. Lin could have had ridiculous endorsement deals, but too many hands in the cookie jar at a critical time. Ask anyone involved with Lin or trying to sign deals with Lin during “Linsanity” what a mess that was. Everyone wanted to be the boss. Let’s say Lin never plays close to as good again. He had the entire sports world talking about him and came out of it with a Volvo deal? I know for a fact, tons of great offers from global brands were on the table. None of them got done because of too many hands in the jar.”

    15. ephus

      I am not certain that Lin bringing in Jim Tanner of Williams & Connolly is good for the Knicks’ prospects to keep Lin. I fear that — if Lin does not get the big back-loaded offer this off-season — Tanner will advise Lin to sign his qualifying offer and become an unrestricted free agent after next season. As I noted above, the Knicks will not have the cap room to sign Lin to anything above the league average salary. If Lin performs at Linsanity levels, he get offers far above $5 million/year.

      If I were in the Knicks front office, I would get a two-year MLE offer in front of Lin as soon as the arbitrator’s decision comes down. If necessary, I would sweeten the offer with a player-option for a third year.

    16. JC Knickfan

      Question best answer by ephus.

      Come July 1st, Toronto make 1 year $5million to Lin and Knicks try counter with 2 year deal $10 million. As RFA Lin has right sign any offer sheet and he sign the Toronto deal? Knicks have 3 day to match it. But in those 3 days are the Knicks still allow to negotiate a 2 year deal or they stuck to confines of Toronto offer sheet?

    17. JC Knickfan

      ephus:
      I am not certain that Lin bringing in Jim Tanner of Williams & Connolly is good for the Knicks’ prospects to keep Lin.I fear that — if Lin does not get the big back-loaded offer this off-season — Tanner will advise Lin to sign his qualifying offer and become an unrestricted free agent after next season.As I noted above, the Knicks will not have the cap room to sign Lin to anything above the league average salary.If Lin performs at Linsanity levels, he get offers far above $5 million/year.

      If I were in the Knicks front office, I would get a two-year MLE offer in front of Lin as soon as the arbitrator’s decision comes down.If necessary, I would sweeten the offer with a player-option for a third year.

      Linsanity-level play (25 ppg 9 app?) mean Melo get traded and build around Lin. Unless Amare or Melo get hurt there not going to be enough shot for Lin have Linsanity type # over season average.

      Question is even at 15 ppg and 7 app he get more then MLE. Knicks are screw if he sign 1 year deal.

    18. ephus

      JC,

      The short answer is that an offer sheet to a restricted free agent must be for at least two years, so the problem you identify cannot occur. Here is Larry Coon’s explanation:

      When a restricted free agent wants to sign with another team, the player and team sign an offer sheet, the principal terms of which the original team is given three days to match. The offer sheet must be for at least two seasons (not including option years). If the player’s prior team also submitted a maximum qualifying offer, then the offer sheet must be for at least three seasons (not including option years). If the player’s original team exercises its right of first refusal within three days, the player is then under contract to his original team, at the principal terms of the offer sheet. If the player’s original team does not exercise its right of first refusal within three days (or provides written notice that it is declining its right of first refusal), the offer sheet becomes an official contract with the new team.

      http://www.cbafaq.com/salarycap.htm#Q43

      Lin has two points of leverage with the Knicks. (1) The possibility that a team with cap space (Nets/Raptors/?) will sign him to a backloaded offer sheet for $36 million over 4 years; and (2) the possiblity that Lin will accept the $1 million qualifying offer and become an unrestricted free agent after next season. By announcing that they will match any offer to Lin, the Knicks are reducing the likelihood that a team will make the big offer, because that team will have to keep $9 million in cap space clear for the three days that the Knicks have to match. It would be a big disadvantage to have that much money tied up during the feeding frenzy on July 11 -14.

    19. Frank

      ephus: If I were in the Knicks front office, I would get a two-year MLE offer in front of Lin as soon as the arbitrator’s decision comes down. If necessary, I would sweeten the offer with a player-option for a third year.

      I’m not sure that I would go this far although I understand why you would want to do that – but by doing this, you are basically setting the market for a guy who may not get any offers. I know it seems ridiculous, but David Lee got ZERO offers when he was an RFA. How often do restricted FAs actually leave? Not very often.

      It is entirely possible that Deron Williams resigns with the Nets, meaning that their interest in Lin would disappear. That would leave Toronto – a team that sucks, and that needs a LOT more than Jeremy Lin to become even passable as a team. Their best player right now is arguably Calderon, who plays the same position as Lin (and who might be better than Lin when it’s all said and done). Toronto’s also in Canada by the way — and while I like Canadians, it’s hard to imagine a California boy who by all accounts is not super money-hungry (or else he would’ve started endorsing everything under the sun during Linsanity) would go to Toronto, where he would inevitably disappoint on a bad team.

      The other thing is that this CBA really punishes bad contracts. There may be some teams that are really interested in his marketability, but that marketability is contingent on him being successful also – and if they screw themselves with his contract and can’t make the team good, then they’ll be stuck in cap hell.

      I think the Knicks stay silent and wait for the offers to come. The offers will come regardless of when the Knicks make their first offer, since there is no incentive for Lin to sign before all the teams show their cards.

    20. Frank

      That being said — if the Knicks get him just with a two year MLE-type offer + a player option for year 3 — I’d be happy. I think that is fair value for both sides, and J-Lin would definitely be protected against loss of skill with basically $15-16MM in guaranteed money.

      I will not be nearly as happy if they end up having to match some ridiculous offer just thrown out there — which is what we might see if Deron leaves and Prokhorov has no one else to spend money on. He’s already shown he likes to mess with the Knicks just for kicks.

    21. ephus

      My idea would be to offer Lin the full MLE (with a possible 3rd year window) in return for Lin agreeing not to meet with other teams. You take the possiblity of the big back-loaded offer off of the table, but guarantee Lin enough money to make it worthwhile.

    22. Frank

      ephus:
      My idea would be to offer Lin the full MLE (with a possible 3rd year window) in return for Lin agreeing not to meet with other teams.You take the possiblity of the big back-loaded offer off of the table, but guarantee Lin enough money to make it worthwhile.

      Agreed – although I think the Knicks have to hold out a little bit of hope that they can get Lin to sign to a smaller #, like the mini-MLE number — mostly because of the clause that says if they use more than $3M of the MLE then they have a $74M hard cap which will be hard to get around – from Coon:
      “…any team that uses its Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception cannot go above the apron for the remainder of that season. In other words, once a team uses its Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception, the apron effectively becomes a hard cap for the remainder of that season..”
      “However, if a team uses its Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception but does not exceed the constraints of the Taxpayer Mid-Level exception (e.g., in 2011-12 they use the Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception to sign a player for $3 million or less), then the team is allowed to later exceed the apron. If they do so, the team is considered to have used the Taxpayer Mid-Level exception rather than the Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception.”

      The best thing for the KNicks would be for Lin to sign a 2 year deal starting at $3MM with a 3rd year player option, in order to maintain flexibility throughout the season. Obviously that’s not necessarily the best thing for Lin’s wallet – but if no one offers Lin a contract because the Knicks would match anything, then he may be forced to take it (or play for the qualifying offer, which- I agree- would be a highly risky proposition for both sides).

    23. ephus

      I have hard time imagining Lin agreeing to the mini-MLE figure. There are a lot of teams, not just Nets/Raptors, who will have the cap space to make at least the MLE offer and a need at PG. For example, New Orleans, Dallas and Indiana will each have a lot of cap space and a need.

    24. ruruland

      TelegraphedPass:
      Ruru has posted some pretty compelling evidence that skilled penetrate-and-kick PGs seem to make Melo a more efficient weapon, and Lin’s driving ability may become more important to this team than Nash’s otherworldly shooting touch.

      Obviously if Nash is willing to sign for nickels on the dollar you do it. Not going into that discussion until it becomes a more realistic scenario.

      Anyway, this current team with shooting can be great.

      Got my Synergy subscription. Started breaking stuff down the last few days.

      When Lin played with the other starters we saw four kinds of shot attempts go way up—-cuts, transition, pick and roll, off screen. The percentage of shots Melo got in those categories shot up dramatically, and he was very effective in the first 3— but his spot up shooting and isolation was so horrendous it didn’t really matter.

      We saw this go down: isolation.

      That’s despite Lin being a very good isolation player.

    25. Brian Cronin

      But if the Knicks make it clear that they will match any offer, then what is the harm in Toronto offering Lin $9 million just to saddle the Knicks with Lin’s salary and the luxury tax implications therein? The “problem” with Lee was that no team had the cap room to make him an offer that was greater than what the Knicks would have gladly matched, which was essentially anything short of a MAX salary (as Lee was clearly very tradeable at $13 million, and he likely would not have gotten $13 million during his RFA offseason). Here, teams could realistically screw the Knicks over with a big offer sheet. They couldn’t with Lee, so they did not bother.

    26. ruruland

      Lin helps the Amar’e problem A LOT.

      The last three years he’s been a below average isolation player, though he was 46th in 2009. The problem in New York has been that far too many of his shots have come in isolation.

      2009 Phoenix: 14.7% plays in isolation
      2010 New York: 32.3% plays in isolation
      2011 New York: 19.7% plays in isolation (ranked 180th in the league)

      Isolations are easily the least effective play for Stat.

      Cuts and pick and roll plays have also dropped between 10-15 percent the last two years.

      However, he’ still an elite roll man, coming in at 13th in the league last year. And his ppp on cuts is historically above average to great.

      With Lin, you’re going to see his isolations go down, his pnr roll man, spot-ups, transition and cuts go up….. Even if Chandler is still the primary roll man, I think Woodson is clever enough, now that he has a very good pnr pg, to use Amar’e in these actions a lot more.

    27. ephus

      Brian Cronin:
      But if the Knicks make it clear that they will match any offer, then what is the harm in Toronto offering Lin $9 million just to saddle the Knicks with Lin’s salary and the luxury tax implications therein? The “problem” with Lee was that no team had the cap room to make him an offer that was greater than what the Knicks would have gladly matched, which was essentially anything short of a MAX salary (as Lee was clearly very tradeable at $13 million, and he likely would not have gotten $13 million during his RFA offseason). Here, teams could realistically screw the Knicks over with a big offer sheet. They couldn’t with Lee, so they did not bother.

      The only downside is that the Knicks will wait the full three days before matching, which will tie up $9 million in salary cap for Toronto (or whoever makes the offer). One of the changes in this CBA was to reduce the number of days that a team has to match, precisely because teams were not willing to make offers to RFAs and be shut out of the market for 7 days while a team decided whether to match. I do not know whether the 7 day rule played any part in David Lee not getting offers as a RFA.

    28. Brian Cronin

      With Toronto, though, I don’t know that they necessarily even spend the money if not on Lin, since they need young, impactful guys and there really aren’t any out there that would sign with Toronto. Which is why I could see them still doing it. If they get Lin, great. If they don’t, then they screw the Knicks over. If Lin goes to Toronto, well, I am sure he will manage to find a way to sleep at night with his pillowcases filled with millions.

    29. ephus

      Toronto is going to have to spend some additional money, if only to get to the minimum payroll. They are currently $5 million below for 2012-13, but will reach that threshold if they make the qualifying offer to J. Bayless.

    30. JC Knickfan

      Thanks answer question ephus.

      Based CBA, I have hard time seeing any team, but going for max back loaded offer right now. Otherwise, they just playing into Knicks hands if do 2 year offer. Toronto/Net owners must be seeing $$$ when they make Lin offer. I really can’t think another player in FA market right now that w/ $9 million offer would still provide positive cash flow to their bottom line. Can any of you think another player that could provide that kind revenue to Net or Toronto? Please sign players should be excluded.

    31. ephus

      If the Nets are having trouble selling out of season tickets (which it appears they are), I could definitely see them making a max offer to Lin, even if they resign Deron Williams.

    32. Frank

      I just really don’t see Toronto being a place Lin will go almost no matter what the offer. There’s very little talent on that team, and they will never be a free agent draw no matter what. Teams that are not in desirable locations and with few assets have to either improve through the draft slowly or overpay for mediocre players. The only other way to do it is to use cap space to make trades that are financially beneficial for the other team, but in this day and age when players can just get amnestied, i don’t really see that as a viable solution to get someone of impact. And the other thing is- improving via trade takes lots of time. Time to set up trades, negotiate, ponder other offers, etc. and there isnt time for that in the brginning of the FA period. Lin has smart people backing him right now and they will not let him get trapped in a long term bad situation.

      Lin has to really WANT to go to Toronto in order to even sign that offer sheet, because you know what? There are lots of good PGs on the market, including certain HoFer that lives in NYC in the offseason and might take a MLE deal that would be left over if Lin goes to Toronto, and the Knicks just might not match a crazy offer. And then he’s stuck playing in another country with Bargnani and Amir Johnson rather than Tyson Chandler, Amare, and Melo.

      The only team that makes me nervous is NJ- if they strike out with DWill they are certain to come after Lin. And they will have tons of cap space, a new arena, and the urban rep of Brooklyn as a draw for other FAs.

      I think ephus’s prediction is the most likely thing. Lin resigns with us for MLE x 2 years with a 3rd year player option. And then we have to hope JR and NOvak take below market deals, and that a decent backup PG decides to come for the minimum.

    33. JC Knickfan

      Frank

      No young player has ever walk away signing huge contract. If Toronto only team that pony up and give max offer which I believe is around 36 million. I will wager he does not walk away from that. Also look situation – he has not made ton money, this provides instant financial stability against injuries and I think agent f-up on not getting more Christian friendly endorsement. Seriously – just Volvo deal?

      I would bet Dolan still matches that offer.

    34. 2FOR18

      Just a quick word on Toronto. I think some are selling it short, as it’s a beautiful, diverse, thriving city with plenty to do. It’s certainly more desirable than some NBA cities here. It’s like a smaller, cleaner version of NY. And based on what Lin did with Amare and melo out, I wouldn’t write off the Raptors so fast if he was made a godfather offer and went there.

    35. Frank

      I’m not selling Toronto short from my personal point of view. I’m just saying that the last time any coveted free agent ever considered Toronto was….never.

      I hear all the talk about no young player ever having turned down this kind of money. I really just don’t see him leaving for Toronto.

    36. ephus

      Frank: I’m not selling Toronto short from my personal point of view. I’m just saying that the last time any coveted free agent ever considered Toronto was….never.

      I take Toronto as a more serious threat, because the cultural issues that push many other free agents away cut differently for Lin. Toronto’s population is more than 12% Chinese, with big immigration from Hong Kong. When Lin hit the big late 3 against the Raptors, at least 20% of the crowd went nuts for him.

      If the Raptors offer Lin a max contract, I think he signs it, hoping that the Knicks match but ready to move to the Great White North.

    37. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      I’d rather live in Toronto than NYC. Cleaner, cheaper, and safer. Plus, NBA players don’t spend much time at home during the winter months. Why would he care that it’s frigid as hell in the winter? Summertime in Montreal and Toronto is like Chicago: sunny, clear, and sun-dressy. Plus I hear Canadians are a nice people.

    38. Brian Cronin

      If the Raptors offer Lin a max contract, I think he signs it, hoping that the Knicks match but ready to move to the Great White North.

      Exactly. That’s what I was referring to. Lin would be signing it figuring the Knicks would match and if they don’t, hey, it’s a guaranteed $36 million for four years instead of $10 million for two years. And again, this is before he knows if he will be healthy next season and before he knows if he won’t suffer another injury next season. Heck, he doesn’t even know that he’ll play well next year (okay, I imagine he is pretty confident that he will play well next year).

      And, again, if the Knicks are making it clear that they will match any offer, what is the risk to Toronto? Three days of not signing anyone when they won’t be signing anyone anyways? The guys the Raptors will end up getting are the ones who shop around until they settle for Toroto. There is no one nearly as good as Lin that they’re going to miss out on by not being in the game for three days. No one. Plus, if the Knicks match, at least they screw up the cap room of a team in their own division. So there is basically zero risk for Toronto to sign Lin to a $36 million contract. Except, of course, the aforementioned risk that he could get hurt or not be as good as we hope/think he will be.

    39. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      Frank:
      I’m not selling Toronto short from my personal point of view. I’m just saying that the last time any coveted free agent ever considered Toronto was….never.

      This is incorrect. I remembered reading about this when Turkoglu was signing there:

      http://www.slamonline.com/online/nba/2009/07/how-toronto-charmed-turkoglu-and-wife/

      I’m not saying Turkoglu is good, but any player commanding over $10M a year should be considered a “coveted” FA.

    40. bobneptune

      The Honorable Cock Jowles:
      I’d rather live in Toronto than NYC. Cleaner, cheaper, and safer. Plus, NBA players don’t spend much time at home during the winter months. Why would he care that it’s frigid as hell in the winter? Summertime in Montreal and Toronto is like Chicago: sunny, clear, and sun-dressy. Plus I hear Canadians are a nice people.

      all of this.

      toronto is a great, cosmopolitan, beautiful , clean, safe city. the summer is the nuts there with all the sailboats on lake ontario, a huge ethnic southern chinese community. its is a nicer city than nyc. it has all of the good things and less of the crap.

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