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Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Knicks Morning News (Saturday, Apr 13 2013)

  • [New York Times] Durant Fined $25,000 by NBA for ‘Menacing Gesture’ (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 07:17:43 GMT)
    The NBA fined Oklahoma City star Kevin Durant $25,000 on Friday for making a “menacing gesture,” when he pretended to slice his throat after throwing down a big dunk during the Thunder’s victory against the Golden State Warriors.    

  • [New York Times] Lakers 118, Warriors 116: Lakers Lose Bryant but Survive Thriller With Warriors (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 06:14:30 GMT)
    Kobe Bryant scored 34 points while playing much of the second half in obvious pain with an injured left leg, which the Lakers later said was probably a torn tendon.    

  • [New York Times] Jefferson’s 40 Lift Jazz Over Wolves, 107-100 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 05:44:41 GMT)
    Al Jefferson took it upon himself to make sure the Utah Jazz didn’t lose ground in the playoff race.    

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Womens Basketball: Loyola Lands Sheryl Swoopes as Coach (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 04:59:08 GMT)
    Sheryl Swoopes, one of the top players in women’s basketball history, is the new coach at Loyola of Chicago.    

  • [New York Times] Westbrook Has 33 and Thunder Beat Portland 106-90 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 04:38:30 GMT)
    Russell Westbrook scored 33 points, including 17 in the third quarter, and the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the short-handed Portland Trail Blazers 106-90 on Friday night.    

  • [New York Times] Sports Briefing | Pro Basketball: Dwyane Wade Returns in Heat Win (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 04:32:44 GMT)
    Dwyane Wade, back after missing six games with an injury, scored 11 points in 34 minutes for Miami against the Celtics.    

  • [New York Times] Nowitzki, Mayo Lead Mavs Past Denver 108-105 in OT (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 04:05:37 GMT)
    Dirk Nowitzki scored 22 points, O.J. Mayo hit tie-breaking 3-pointers late in regulation and overtime, and the Dallas Mavericks denied Denver a franchise record in wins with a 108-105 victory over the Nuggets on Friday night.    

  • [New York Times] Knicks 101, Cavaliers 91: Knicks Shift Into Cruise Control on Way to Second Seed (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 03:39:56 GMT)
    Carmelo Anthony scored 31 points as the Knicks bounced back from a rare loss with a victory at Cleveland, moving the Knicks closer to the coveted second seed in the Eastern Conference.    

  • [New York Times] Nets 117, Pacers 109: Nets Beat Pacers as Deron Williams Scores 33 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 03:35:53 GMT)
    The Nets scored 69 first-half points and then lost a 24-point lead on the way to a victory over the Pacers, their final playoff-caliber opponent of the regular season.    

  • [New York Times] Spurs Shake Off Player Losses, Beat Kings (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 03:20:39 GMT)
    Tony Parker had 22 points and 10 assists, and San Antonio never trailed in a 108-101 victory over the Sacramento Kings on Friday, a day the Spurs lost two key players.    

  • [New York Times] Griffin, Paul Lead Clippers Past Hornets, 96-93 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 03:14:56 GMT)
    Blake Griffin scored 20 points, Chris Paul made clutch plays on both ends of the floor in the final minute, and the Los Angeles Clippers overcame a 10-point deficit in the fourth quarter for a 96-93 victory over the New Orleans Hornets on Friday night.    

  • [New York Times] Grizzlies Snap Long Losing Streak in Houston (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 03:05:40 GMT)
    Marc Gasol had 15 points and 12 rebounds, and the Memphis Grizzlies snapped a 13-game losing streak in Houston with an 82-78 victory over the Rockets on Friday night.    

  • [New York Times] Anthony Scores 31 as Knicks Top Cavs 101-91 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 02:53:53 GMT)
    For once, the most important number on Carmelo Anthony’s stat line was his minutes.    

  • [New York Times] Hawks Rally in 4th Quarter, Beat Bucks 109-104 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 02:14:49 GMT)
    Jeff Teague and Josh Smith each scored 24 points and the Atlanta Hawks used a 13-0 run in the fourth quarter to take the lead after trailing by 19 early in the second half and beat the Milwaukee Bucks 109-104 on Friday night.    

  • [New York Times] Pistons Rout Bobcats 113-93 for 3rd Straight Win (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 02:14:41 GMT)
    Jonas Jerebko scored 17 of his 21 points in the first half, and the Detroit Pistons routed the Charlotte Bobcats 113-93 on Friday night behind terrific outside shooting.    

  • [New York Times] Heat Roll Again, Top Celtics 109-101 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 02:11:44 GMT)
    LeBron James, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade had not played together in a couple of weeks, so the Miami Heat needed some time to get back into rhythm.    

  • [New York Times] Nets Beat Pacers, Assured of at Least No. 4 Seed (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 01:53:49 GMT)
    Deron Williams scored 33 points and the Brooklyn Nets secured home-court advantage in the first round of the playoffs with a 117-109 victory over the Indiana Pacers on Friday night.    

  • [New York Times] Johnson Scores 24 as Raptors Beat Bulls 97-88 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 01:47:41 GMT)
    Amir Johnson had 24 points and nine rebounds, Rudy Gay scored 23 points and the Toronto Raptors earned their second straight win over Chicago, beating the Bulls 97-88 on Friday night.    

  • [New York Times] Durant Fined $25,000 for Throat Slash Gesture (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 01:44:25 GMT)
    Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant was fined $25,000 by the National Basketball Association on Friday after making a throat slashing gesture during Thursday’s win over the Golden State Warriors.    

  • [New York Times] 76ers Thwart Wizards’ 9th-Place Hopes, Win 97-86 (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 01:26:33 GMT)
    Jrue Holiday scored 22 points, and the Philadelphia 76ers found enough motivation to put the Washington Wizards’ pursuit of ninth place to rest for good Friday night, pulling away in the second half for a 97-86 victory.    

  • [New York Newsday] Carmelo Anthony, J.R. Smith score 31 each as Knicks beat Cavs (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 01:04:20 EDT)
    Carmelo Anthony did everything he could to put the Cavaliers away so he could get some rest. J.R. Smith helped make sure Anthony didn't have to get off the bench in the fourth quarter.

  • [New York Daily News] Melo, Smith each score 31 points in 101-91 win over Cavs (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 02:03:14 GMT)
    The losing streak lasted less than one day and now the Knicks are on the verge of clinching second place in the Eastern Conference.    

  • [New York Post] Melo, Knicks 1 win from securing seed (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 03:58:16 -0500)
    CLEVELAND â?? In early March, Quicken Loans Arena was the scene of a great Knicks comeback and Carmelo Anthony’s lowest moment of the season.
    This is where Anthony tripped, fell and stormed off the court with a puffy knee with the Knicks trailing by 22 points. The Knicks rallied and…

  • [New York Post] Jones inked; Thomas cut (Sat, 13 Apr 2013 03:09:10 -0500)
    CLEVELAND â?? Solomon Jones is 6-foot-10, athletic, can block shots and rebound. That’s all the desperate Knicks need right now as they go through a big-man crisis.
    Yesterday they tried to add some frontcourt oomph with the signing of Jones, a journeyman big man who returned from China on March…

  • 70 comments on “Knicks Morning News (Saturday, Apr 13 2013)

    1. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      Douglas:
      Torn Achilles for Kobe. It’s the first time I’ve ever felt sorry for the man.

      Didn’t he cheat on his wife with, like, 105 women? I’m not saying he deserves an injury like that, but it’s hard to feel bad for an egotistical, throw-yr-teammates-under-the-bus, serial adulterer/accused rapist with a net worth in the nine digits. Maybe I’m in the minority.

      Remember that story where Jerry Buss said that Kobe complained about the size of the jet they chartered for him for his rape case? Yeah.

    2. WeirdJohn

      Want an opinion from you all. Do the Knicks go all out tomorrow and try to beat Indiana for the 2 seed, or do they rest guys and just work on beating Charlotte on Monday? It would be great to beat Indiana, but it seems that the physical play of Indiana makes it more likely for injuries than Charlotte or even Atlanta.

    3. mr.JayP

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: Didn’t he cheat on his wife with, like, 105 women? I’m not saying he deserves an injury like that, but it’s hard to feel bad for an egotistical, throw-yr-teammates-under-the-bus, serial adulterer/accused rapist with a net worth in the nine digits. Maybe I’m in the minority.

      Remember that story where Jerry Buss said that Kobe complained about the size of the jet they chartered for him for his rape case? Yeah.

      It’s hard to feel bad for a player that leaves everything on the court. Hard to feel bad for a player that doesn’t care about being buddy buddy with everyone in the league, winning means everything. I respect ever ounce of Kobe’s game. After him n Garnett is gone, this league would enter a big pussification period.

    4. Hubert Davis

      WeirdJohn:
      Want an opinion from you all.Do the Knicks go all out tomorrow and try to beat Indiana for the 2 seed, or do they rest guys and just work on beating Charlotte on Monday?It would be great to beat Indiana, but it seems that the physical play of Indiana makes it more likely for injuries than Charlotte or even Atlanta.

      We would never consider resting people for Sunday.

      I happen to think we’ll handle them easily.

    5. Z-man

      I don’t feel sorry for Kobe per se, but feel sorry that an all-time great player having one of his best all-around seasons at age 34 despite physical hardship and organizational turmoil will not be there in the playoffs. The dude played over 3000 minutes, cut back his usage, shot at a .570 TS%, and carried his dysfunctional team to the playoffs on his back. So while I don’t admire the person, I respect the skill and dedication of the player, and feel sorry that he won’t be there to entertain me and other NBA fans.

      Lots of “greats” in many professions are assholes personally. When something happens to them that deprives them of practicing their profession, it’s a loss to all who depend on the profession, even if just for entertainment value.

      On the other hand, if Garnett would blow out his achilles, I would rejoice, and only partially because he is an obstacle in our path. Yet deep down, I admire him too, just like I did Reggie Miller and Isiah (the player.) Whether they are saints or assholes in their personal life doesn’t matter much to me.

    6. flossy

      Speaking of assholes, am I nuts to think the Knicks should try to pick up Stephen Jackson next season for cheap? We need wing depth if we’re going to play Melo at the 4 long term, and Jax is old and crazy enough to fit in.

    7. Robtachi

      Joe DiMaggio was pretty much a known scumbag, but he was an all-time great and people loved him and his game anyway. We want to like these athletes, but that’s not why we’re watching them. The playoffs are more entertaining with Kobe and the Lakers in there, so this sucks. Plus, I just can’t get over how inept Mike D’antoni is as a coach, and my confusion at his continued employment. Melo should be the MVP simply for running him out of town, if true.

    8. Z-man

      Thing about D’Antoni is, lots of teams have incorporated elemets of his offense, and defenses have adapted, so his SSoL system doesn’t mean much in terms of separating him from other coaches. The Knicks are launching threes at an historic rate, even though they have an iso-heavy, defensive-minded coach. When you have nothing else to hang your hat on, you get exposed. D’Antoni’s 15 minutes of fame are over, probably forever.

    9. johnlocke

      Really? I admire Kobe….as a basketball player. Are you really judging athletes based on who cheats on their wife? The guy is still with his wife and raising his kids and he was found innocent of the rape…come on dude. Lord knows how many of these athletes cheat in their wives–you seem to be singling him out bc either you love to be contrarian or you just don’t like the guy. He earned his net worth in the nine digits and no elite athlete gets where they are without being super competitive and egotistical. MJ was such a nice guy right?

      I’d take Kobe on my team any day…lets see what the young studs in the league are doing when they’re 35. The guy is hard work, grit and competitiveness personified.

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: Didn’t he cheat on his wife with, like, 105 women? I’m not saying he deserves an injury like that, but it’s hard to feel bad for an egotistical, throw-yr-teammates-under-the-bus, serial adulterer/accused rapist with a net worth in the nine digits. Maybe I’m in the minority.

      Remember that story where Jerry Buss said that Kobe complained about the size of the jet they chartered for him for his rape case? Yeah.

    10. johnlocke

      If we can deal with KMart, Jax would be fine…

      flossy:
      Speaking of assholes, am I nuts to think the Knicks should try to pick up Stephen Jackson next season for cheap?We need wing depth if we’re going to play Melo at the 4 long term, and Jax is old and crazy enough to fit in.

    11. Z-man

      Anybody notice that Melo has posted elite rebounding numbers lately? How is that possible, given that he is a missling rebounder for his position? Just luck, I guess.

    12. mr.JayP

      Z-man:
      Thing about D’Antoni is, lots of teams have incorporated elemets of his offense, and defenses have adapted, so his SSoL system doesn’t mean much in terms of separating him from other coaches. The Knicks are launching threes at an historic rate, even though they have an iso-heavy, defensive-minded coach. When you have nothing else to hang your hat on, you get exposed. D’Antoni’s 15 minutes of fame are over, probably forever.

      His 15 min of fame as being herald as great coach is over. But if he does make adjustments and stop being so hard headed I think he’ll remain a coach in the NBA.

      But his name/fame will always be attached to changing the “Game” the way he did.

    13. Z-man

      Yeah, but he got a bit lucky with the Suns, he was a nothing coach before then. For the most part, it’s a players league. Now he has been exposed, and after this mess, unlikely that any high-profile team trusts him again. But there’s a lot of bad management out there, you never know.

      I agree, though, that he will get more coaching gigs, and maybe he gets lucky with players again.

    14. mokers

      D’Antoni is smart but he needs to be willing to adjust his style of play more for personnel available and game situations. Put him in a place where there are no playoff expectations and or a tenacious sports media and he will do well.

    15. d-mar

      Z-man:
      Anybody notice that Melo has posted elite rebounding numbers lately? How is that possible, given that he is a missling rebounder for his position? Just luck, I guess.

      You left out that he plays no defense and never passes. (and I assume you meant “middling”?)

    16. d-mar

      So what’s our ideal scenario for the rest of the season?

      – Beat Indy tomorrow, rest everyone for the next 2 games.

      – Hope Chicago gets the 6 seed and the Bulls and Pacers can beat the crap out of each other in the first round (would be a huge break for the Nets, but just means an earlier 2nd round beating by the Heat)

      I’m starting to buy into the idea that we could dispatch the Celtics in 5 or at the most 6 games. The idea that they’re playing some kind of “rope a dope” and will suddenly become the old Celtics in the playoffs doesn’t make any sense when you look at how badly Bradley is playing and how awful their bench has been.

      Bring ‘em on!

    17. mr.JayP

      I’m not even concerned about the C’s.

      Mia. And Chi are of concern. Chi needs to move to that 5th spot so they can dispatch of the Heatless in 7. If rose comes back, 6 lol.

    18. Z-man

      So, in the 14 games since he returned from having his knee drained, Melo has had 8 or more rebounds 10 times, and 6 double-doubles. In 6 of those games, he has had 5 or more offensive rebounds. In two of the lower rebound games, he had 50 points on 70% shooting and 40 points on 63% shooting. The Knicks have gone 13-1 in that span.

      Maybe Melo’s aggregates don’t match up with LeBron and Durant, but how many other players are capable of putting up these kinds of numbers for a sustained stretch?

      Melo is a superstar in his prime. To say otherwise is just foolish.

    19. WeirdJohn

      Hubert Davis: We would never consider resting people for Sunday.

      I happen to think we’ll handle them easily.

      I guess it is hard not to think that after that poor performance against the Nets.

    20. WeirdJohn

      mokers:
      D’Antoni is smart but he needs to be willing to adjust his style of play more for personnel available and game situations. Put him in a place where there are no playoff expectations and or a tenacious sports media and he will do well.

      This comment is a great one….FOR ME TO POOP ON!!! I keed, I keed.

    21. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      johnlocke:
      Really? I admire Kobe….as a basketball player. Are you really judging athletes based on who cheats on their wife? The guy is still with his wife and raising his kids and he was found innocent of the rape…come on dude. Lord knows how many of these athletes cheat in their wives–you seem to be singling him out bc either you love to be contrarian or you just don’t like the guy. He earned his net worth in the nine digits and no elite athlete gets where they are without being super competitive and egotistical. MJ was such a nice guy right?

      I’d take Kobe on my team any day…lets see what the young studs in the league are doing when they’re 35. The guy is hard work, grit and competitiveness personified.

      I feel bad for basketball fans who don’t get to see the drama of the Lakers either missing the playoffs by a hair or getting swept in the first round. I do not feel bad for Kobe Bryant the person. I don’t really care that he’s a hard worker, gritty or competitive. That’s not everything to me. I’d rather play on a rec league team that plays hard and shakes hands after the game than a team that wins every game and treats their opponents and the people around them like shit. I trained in judo for a bit and I think they have the competitive attitude right: mutual respect always. A teammate who calls out the people who have enabled their success (remember what he said about Bynum)? Not the kind of guy I want to see succeed.

    22. Juany8

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: I feel bad for basketball fans who don’t get to see the drama of the Lakers either missing the playoffs by a hair or getting swept in the first round. I do not feel bad for Kobe Bryant the person. I don’t really care that he’s a hard worker, gritty or competitive. That’s not everything to me. I’d rather play on a rec league team that plays hard and shakes hands after the game than a team that wins every game and treats their opponents and the people around them like shit. I trained in judo for a bit and I think they have the competitive attitude right: mutual respect always. A teammate who calls out the people who have enabled their success (remember what he said about Bynum)? Not the kind of guy I want to see succeed.

      Lebron, KG, Jordan, Magic (oh yea he got a coach fired in a much more direct manner than Melo ever did)… The list of superstars who have been complete douche bags is quite long. Nobody has to root for a player they don’t like, but we as fans know next to nothing about who these people really are on a personal level. I like and root for Kobe because he’s an awesome basketball player and I love watching his game. As far as someone I’d actually like to go have a drink with, I can’t think of a single star I would even consider except maybe Steve Nash. The two don’t mix in my mind, but again, everyone roots for who they like and there doesn’t have to be much of a logical reason for it

    23. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      It’s just the question of sympathy. I don’t like that I won’t get to see Kobe play basketball, because despite the middling efficiency of the previous few seasons, he has an exceptional basketball player even while overrated. I don’t feel bad for him for having to experience failure. I didn’t feel bad for him when he excommunicated Shaq and found himself having to play with Kwame Brown. Don’t feel bad for him now.

      I think Andre Iguodala would be a good person to have a drink with. Chris Paul seems like a good guy, too. But if there’s anything that Tiger Woods has taught us…

    24. JK47

      Kobe is a lot like Jordan in that he’s a humorless and petty jerk who seems to live a life completely devoid of joy. Jordan could at least put on some fake charisma long enough to get through a “Space Jam” movie, but Kobe can’t even manage that. He’s just dour, snide, bitchy and downright unlikeable.

      He must be the biggest pain in the ass teammate ever. He’s had a terrible relationship with every sidekick they’ve teamed him up with. I’m convinced Dwight Howard is tanking this season just to fuck with Kobe.

    25. mr.JayP

      JK47:
      Kobe is a lot like Jordan in that he’s a humorless and petty jerk who seems to live a life completely devoid of joy.Jordan could at least put on some fake charisma long enough to get through a “Space Jam” movie, but Kobe can’t even manage that.He’s just dour, snide, bitchy and downright unlikeable.

      He must be the biggest pain in the ass teammate ever.He’s had a terrible relationship with every sidekick they’ve teamed him up with.I’m convinced Dwight Howard is tanking this season just to fuck with Kobe.

      I enjoy Kobe’s mannerism’s. I actually think he has a sense of humor and I’ve seen him laugh n joke on many occasions. Even tho he probably is a pain in the ass, how many players would kill to have a teammate with Kobe’s dedication ? His will to win alone is legendary.
      D12 is the most beta dude there ever was lol.

    26. flossy

      Don’t get all the D’Antoni hate here and around the internet. How could anyone who has watched a few Lakers games this season flog the dead horse of “he’s an inflexible system coach, round pegs, square holes etc.”?

      The Lakers have NOT been running his signature uptempo, 4-out spread PnR system this year. At all. Hell, their main pieces have been in and out of the lineup so much that they don’t have much of any kind of cohesive offensive system to fall back on–they’re making it up as they go along. But it’s slow and it involves(/d) a lot of Kobe posting up, both of which are basically anathema to SSOL.

      Sure, that roster has some great players, but outside the top 3-4 (who are rarely all healthy) their roster really sucks. I think any Knicks fan who was paying attention last year will attest that having too many Toney Douglas/Landry Fields types on your team can negate the impact of Kobe/Dwight or Carmelo/Chandler caliber players.

      As for the Kobe injury, how the hell was that D’Antoni’s fault?! Kobe always plays big minutes, and this was a random non-contact injury. Why would anyone expect the coach to ease up with a playoff spot on the line? Why would anyone thing Kobe would even agree to play fewer minutes when the team clearly grinds to a stop without him?

      Anyway, I don’t think he’s the best coach ever or anything, but he’s at least average with the potential to be much more if given a decent roster (I think he’d be amazing in Houston, LAC, GSW, MIN, even the Cavs would be a much more interesting team under him. His offensive system is no longer revolutionary, only because the revolution already happened and it’s over and he won–a ton of good teams (including the Knicks) have copied a lot of his offensive strategy to the point where the NBA barely resembles the league in which the last Knicks team made a deep playoff run.

    27. Z-man

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: I feel bad for basketball fans who don’t get to see the drama of the Lakers either missing the playoffs by a hair or getting swept in the first round. I do not feel bad for Kobe Bryant the person. I don’t really care that he’s a hard worker, gritty or competitive. That’s not everything to me. I’d rather play on a rec league team that plays hard and shakes hands after the game than a team that wins every game and treats their opponents and the people around them like shit. I trained in judo for a bit and I think they have the competitive attitude right: mutual respect always. A teammate who calls out the people who have enabled their success (remember what he said about Bynum)? Not the kind of guy I want to see succeed.

      Mutual respect always…hmmm

    28. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      Z-man: Mutual respect always…hmmm

      I said judo got it right, not me. That said, I thank people even for playing pick-up games at the uni courts. Can’t play the game by myself, can I?

      I thank you, ruruland, jon abbey, and all the other nay-sayers for defining my position in relief. Thank you.

    29. max fisher-cohen

      MDA is not good at managing personalities. It used to be when he was coaching Phoenix that his offense was innovative enough to overcome that. That’s not the case anymore.

      Still, I think he’s a good coach for the right kind of team. He IS smart, and with the right team, is as good at encouraging great offensive execution as, for example, Thibodeaux is at encouraging defensive execution.

      And to add, how about this for irony: IMO, the main reason this Laker roster isn’t great with or without Kobe is BECAUSE of D’Antoni’s innovation. So many teams spread the floor. So many teams initiate their offense through high screens and dribble penetration. The lakers are just WAY too slow to make good rotations. Offensively, LA has been pretty good. But they could have been even better had they had some decent shooters/slashers to play alongside their post threats. More importantly though, it’s their defense that has doomed them.

      Blame it on D’Antoni if you want. I blame it on the fact that a Nash, Kobe, MWP, Gasol, Howard lineup is slow at every position but the 5. LA desperately needed to move Gasol for some wing players and should never have invested so much in Nash when they already had three guys who were going to marginalize him as an initiation point on offense.

      Maybe you want to compare them to the recent laker championship teams, but those teams played Odom for a ton of minutes at PF. The value Lamar’s ability to space the floor and guard perimeter players cannot be overestimated. Kobe and MWP were also several years younger and more mobile.

    30. Z-man

      max fisher-cohen: Still, I think he’s a good coach for the right kind of team.

      That’s my problem with him. Why does he need the right kind of team? Why can’t he adapt to his players?

    31. max fisher-cohen

      Z-man: That’s my problem with him. Why does he need the right kind of team? Why can’t he adapt to his players?

      absolutely. But I just dont’ think anyone was going to have success with this Laker team. Besides, how many coaches do you know that have truly adapted to their personnel? Great coaches stick with GMs that respect their style fo play and give them the personnel to succeed.

      If the Lakers had signed Steve Nash while Jackson was coaching, do you really think Jackson would have sacrificed the triangle to make for a more PnR-centric offense? I doubt it, but we will never know because Jackson is too well-respected for management to undermine him like that.

      If you gave Tom Thibodeaux the roster that the Suns had under MDA, would he be able to adapt and open up his offense? Would he be able to get as much out of that team? I doubt it.

      Sure, D’Antoni is dogmatic, but I think he’s also a victim of the anti-change good old boy idiocy that comes when anyone takes a risk and tries something new. He’s still plagued by this viewpoint that he can’t coach a championship team while an equally stubborn coach like Tom Thibodeau gets a pass because his focus on defense fits more with the die hard cliches of 90s physical basketball.

      And TBH, I’ll wait to judge D’Antoni’s ability to adapt until he’s given a roster that isn’t dysfunctional. Who knows how he would have coached this team had it had Jason Kidd, Pablo Prigioni and a version of Iman Shumpert that can actually shoot. Right now, it’s a fair criticism, but I don’t htink there’s conclusive evidence that MDA wouldn’t adapt were he to have a great roster that didn’t suit his system.

    32. flossy

      Z-man: That’s my problem with him. Why does he need the right kind of team? Why can’t he adapt to his players?

      Most of his players this year are either injured (Nash, Gasol, Howard and MWP have missed a combined 76 games, Howard has been subpar due to injuries all season, now of course Kobe’s out) or goddamn terrible basketball players (Jamison? Blake? Meeks? UGH).

      He also didn’t even have a training camp for the 2nd season in a row, hard to craft a system to fit your roster with zero time to prepare and massive expectations to win immediately.

    33. Z-man

      flossy: Most of his players this year are either injured (Nash, Gasol, Howard and MWP have missed a combined 76 games, Howard has been subpar due to injuries all season, now of course Kobe’s out) or goddamn terrible basketball players (Jamison?Blake?Meeks?UGH).

      He also didn’t even have a training camp for the 2nd season in a row, hard to craft a system to fit your roster with zero time to prepare and massive expectations to win immediately.

      Fair enough. I just didn’t like the way he handled our roster, or our defense, or our playing time. I didn’t like the way he would stick guys in the doghouse. I was thrilled to see him go. And I never thought that Woodson was better before the change, but to me it’s been night and day.

    34. flossy

      Z-man: Fair enough. I just didn’t like the way he handled our roster, or our defense, or our playing time. I didn’t like the way he would stick guys in the doghouse. I was thrilled to see him go. And I never thought that Woodson was better before the change, but to me it’s been night and day.

      Woodson has absolutely been better at handling the egos on this team and getting maximum effort and buy-in from all of the players, which makes a huge difference, no doubt–almost all the differnce, TBH.

      I don’t honestly think Woodson is a much better defensive coach (once Tyson showed up, MDA’s Knicks teams became top-10 defensively overnight); if anything, he’s been a better offensive coach than MDA by adding some different, post-centric wrinkles to the basic 4-out PnR attack that MDA brought back into style, and by not trying to fight Melo and JR’s bone-deep instinct to ISO.

      The rest of the criticisms of D’Antoni could just as easily and accurately be leveled at Woodson.

    35. Z-man

      max fisher-cohen: Besides, how many coaches do you know that have truly adapted to their personnel? Great coaches stick with GMs that respect their style fo play and give them the personnel to succeed.

      Pat Riley, Popovich, and Woodson, to name three. And if you have a system that starts on the defensive end (Rivers, Thibs, etc.) In Rivers’ case, he was a lame duck when the big 3 were assembled. Same with Spoelstra. I would argue that very few coaches have much control over personnel, and very few GMs consider the “system” as much as the team’s needs vs. what they can do under the cap.

      It’s a players league, especially when it comes to offense.

    36. Juany8

      I think Flossy has it right, and that it’s the injuries/terrible supporting cast that’s hindering this team more than anything, although I’m not a fan of D’Antoni as a coach. Not the worst in the league, but nothing special either, and he is not exactly good at managing difficult players. Regardless, when the Lakers got Steve Nash and Dwight Howard, the idea was that they were going to get the all star Nash and Howard. Nash has become completely irrelevant, and pretty much no one has been talking about Dwight Howard as the best center in the NBA this year. Add in all the injuries, and the team had no hope. Imagine how the Knicks would have looked like last year if Jeremy Lin, Novak, and JR Smith hadn’t come out of nowhere

    37. Z-man

      flossy: Woodson has absolutely been better at handling the egos on this team and getting maximum effort and buy-in from all of the players, which makes a huge difference, no doubt–almost all the differnce, TBH.

      I don’t honestly think Woodson is a much better defensive coach (once Tyson showed up, MDA’s Knicks teams became top-10 defensively overnight); if anything, he’s been a better offensive coach than MDA by adding some different, post-centric wrinkles to the basic 4-out PnR attack that MDA brought back into style, and by not trying to fight Melo and JR’s bone-deep instinct to ISO.

      The rest of the criticisms of D’Antoni could just as easily and accurately be leveled at Woodson.

      You are kind of making my point. He is a better offensive coach with the same personnel, which was supposed to be D’Antoni’s strength. On defense, he was brought in as a defensive-minded assistant at the same time Tyson was brought in; however, D’Antoni probably was dismissive of him since he was brought in by management. Although Amare can be all over the place with his quotes, he DID say that this was the first time he was taught how to play defense.

      The Knicks have won 14 of 15 essentially without Chandler, and their defensive schemes are partly to credit for this. Their switching and trapping has been pretty impressive, especially in 4th quarters, and has masked their lack of size.

      I guess you could argue that bringing in Sheed was a coach-driven move, but for the most part, Woody has adapted well to his personnel.

    38. Z-man

      I also think that getting your players to fully commit to your schemes and play their hardest at all (most) times is HUGE. If you can’t do that, who cares how brilliant your ideas are?

    39. ruruland

      Z-man:
      I also think that getting your players to fully commit to your schemes and play their hardest at all (most) times is HUGE. If you can’t do that, who cares how brilliant your ideas are?

      I don’t know why MDA is considered brilliant.

      He’s not innovative. Credit him for popularizing 4-out I guess. 7SO is pretty simple.

      I don’t think he’s a good coach in any respect. He has a system that he learned. It failed at first, and actually hasn’t really been all that effective outside of Phoenix as an every play, run the counters to it, offense.

      The list of negatives is long. Everything you’d want a coach to do he’s bad at.

    40. ruruland

      flossy: Most of his players this year are either injured (Nash, Gasol, Howard and MWP have missed a combined 76 games, Howard has been subpar due to injuries all season, now of course Kobe’s out) or goddamn terrible basketball players (Jamison?Blake?Meeks?UGH).

      He also didn’t even have a training camp for the 2nd season in a row, hard to craft a system to fit your roster with zero time to prepare and massive expectations to win immediately.

      Except they haven’t played well with everyone healthy.

      MDA spent the first half of the season making deep Howard and Gasol touches anathema.

      It took him forever to adjust, and he still hasn’t built an offensive and defensive system to fit strengths of roster.

      Howard is not a fast dive man. He’s a great post scorer. So is Gasol. That’s not how they were they used. They are still underused as such.

      A lot of rumblings from Bryant and Howard about not working on defense in practice.

      He built Nash up to be the savior when he had three of the best post scorers (and Artest as a 4th is really good) in the game surrounded by decent spot-up shooting.

      He once again comes off as someone who doesn’t feel like it’s his job to take responsibility.

    41. jon abbey

      you don’t hire a coach who doesn’t believe in post play for a team with Gasol and Howard, obviously. D’Antoni was innovative when he got to the NBA obviously and got lucky he had some superathletic young personnel to put around Nash (the year they started Amar’e, Marion, Joe Johnson and Q was one of my favorite teams of alltime to watch), but the league caught up to him and he has been completely exposed in recent years, both as very inflexible and in numerous other ways. are there Knicks fans who really don’t remember our inability to ever run a quality play out of a timeout under him? Woodson has his issues too, but he is way better than D’Antoni.

    42. xduckshoex

      Z-man: You are kind of making my point. He is a better offensive coach with the same personnel, which was supposed to be D’Antoni’s strength. On defense, he was brought in as a defensive-minded assistant at the same time Tyson was brought in; however, D’Antoni probably was dismissive of him since he was brought in by management. Although Amare can be all over the place with his quotes, he DID say that this was the first time he was taught how to play defense.

      The Knicks have won 14 of 15 essentially without Chandler, and their defensive schemes are partly to credit for this. Their switching and trapping has been pretty impressive, especially in 4th quarters, and has masked their lack of size.

      I guess you could argue that bringing in Sheed was a coach-driven move, but for the most part, Woody has adapted well to his personnel.

      Yes, Amare DID say that he was never taught defense. He’s said it more than once. He said it after being coached by one of the coaches that he had earlier credited with finally teaching him now to play defense. It’s just Amare’s way of deflecting blame for his consistently terrible defense.

    43. BigBlueAL

      Celtics clinched the 7 seed tonight. Time for the Knicks to tank the last 3 games and drop to the 3 seed :-)

    44. xduckshoex

      Also, I don’t know how people can say that Mike D hasn’t been innovative when basically every good offensive team has implemented some element of his offense. He has completely changed the NBA game.

      And the reason that he’s not as successful now is the same reason every coach who was once successful “falls off”: talent. That’s it. The Lakers are not a particularly talented team, especially given the injury issues that they’ve struggled with all year. Expecting success from a coach with no training camp and a roster of injured players, spare parts and Kobe Bryant is a little unreasonable.

    45. MeloDrama

      xduckshoex:
      Also, I don’t know how people can say that Mike D hasn’t been innovative when basically every good offensive team has implemented some element of his offense.He has completely changed the NBA game.

      And the reason that he’s not as successful now is the same reason every coach who was once successful “falls off”: talent.That’s it.The Lakers are not a particularly talented team, especially given the injury issues that they’ve struggled with all year.Expecting success from a coach with no training camp and a roster of injured players, spare parts and Kobe Bryant is a little unreasonable.

      D’Antoni was definitely innovative and I think basketball fans owe him a little gratitude for ushering in a brand of much more watchable basketball. The best compliment to him is that a multi-time NBA champion like Gregg Popovich completely adapted his team to that offensive system. He could see that was the future.

      But having said that, the same could be said of Mike Martz in the NFL. D’Antoni is the Martz of the NBA … both guys pushed a innovative style into the league and then both guys refused to deviate from that style even a little bit. The rest of the league caught up to D’Antoni and now his warts as a coach stand out more – running guys into the ground, refusing to adapt to personnel. Making Pau Gasol into a stretch 4 was ludicrous. Just like Martz refusing to protect his quarterbacks or run the ball against heavy DB looks.

    46. MeloDrama

      ruruland: I don’t know why MDA is considered brilliant.

      He’s not innovative. Credit him for popularizing 4-out I guess.7SO is pretty simple.

      I don’t think he’s a good coach in any respect. He has a system that he learned. It failed at first, and actually hasn’t really been all that effective outside of Phoenix as an every play, run the counters to it, offense.

      The list of negatives is long. Everything you’d want a coach to do he’s bad at.

      I think you have to credit the man for being the first to really embrace and succeed with that at the pro level. Everyone copied what Phoenix did.

      I agree that he’s now a negative.

    47. MeloDrama

      Z-man:
      Thing about D’Antoni is, lots of teams have incorporated elemets of his offense, and defenses have adapted, so his SSoL system doesn’t mean much in terms of separating him from other coaches. The Knicks are launching threes at an historic rate, even though they have an iso-heavy, defensive-minded coach. When you have nothing else to hang your hat on, you get exposed. D’Antoni’s 15 minutes of fame are over, probably forever.

      This. Exactly this.

    48. ruruland

      xduckshoex: Yes, Amare DID say that he was never taught defense.He’s said it more than once.He said it after being coached by one of the coaches that he had earlier credited with finally teaching him now to play defense.It’s just Amare’s way of deflecting blame for his consistently terrible defense.

      Except…. Amar’e has been significantly better and more attentive defensively under Woodson than at any point of his career.

      Amar’e is not the only person to talk about MDA’s lack of emphasis and hands-on teaching of defense.

    49. ruruland

      xduckshoex:
      Also, I don’t know how people can say that Mike D hasn’t been innovative when basically every good offensive team has implemented some element of his offense.He has completely changed the NBA game.

      And the reason that he’s not as successful now is the same reason every coach who was once successful “falls off”: talent.That’s it.The Lakers are not a particularly talented team, especially given the injury issues that they’ve struggled with all year.Expecting success from a coach with no training camp and a roster of injured players, spare parts and Kobe Bryant is a little unreasonable.

      Right, he re-introduced an offensive philosophy that changed the NBA game, but he did not invent anything.

      You honestly think the Lakers are less talented than the Knicks, including injuries?
      Sure, the Knicks role players from 7-12 are better, but that top 6 for the Lakers is amazing, even at their advanced age.

      The ’13 Lakers will go down as one of the most underachieved in league history, perhaps sports history.

      I guess the Knicks taking off after he resigned was just coincidence, too.

    50. ruruland

      MeloDrama: D’Antoni was definitely innovative and I think basketball fans owe him a little gratitude for ushering in a brand of much more watchable basketball. The best compliment to him is that a multi-time NBA champion like Gregg Popovich completely adapted his team to that offensive system. He could see that was the future.

      But having said that, the same could be said of Mike Martz in the NFL. D’Antoni is the Martz of the NBA … both guys pushed a innovative style into the league and then both guys refused to deviate from that style even a little bit. The rest of the league caught up to D’Antoni and now his warts as a coach stand out more – running guys into the ground, refusing to adapt to personnel. Making Pau Gasol into a stretch 4 was ludicrous. Just like Martz refusing to protect his quarterbacks or run the ball against heavy DB looks.

      Like this comparison.

      The game is always evolving, football more than basketball.

    51. xduckshoex

      ruruland: Except…. Amar’e has been significantly better and more attentive defensively under Woodson than at any point of his career.

      Amar’e is not the only person to talk about MDA’s lack of emphasis and hands-on teaching of defense.

      Except….that’s not true at all. The Knicks are not a particularly good defensive team this year and they’ve been better without Amare, which has been true of Amare every year but one of his NBA career(the lone exception being a the 2009 Suns who were 26th in the NBA defensively)

      When Terry Porter takes over and you talk about how you finally have a coach teaching you defense and then three coaches later you say the exact same thing again you’re full of shit, especially when your defense still sucks.

    52. DRed

      ruru, if we’re talking about D’Antoni’s performance this year, it’s irrelevant how talented the Lakers are when healthy, because they haven’t been.

    53. Tony Pena

      Don’t feel too good about tomorrow, feel like the Pacer bigs are going to try to beat up Melo. I would punt and take care of Charlotte, or Atl. Why is it that they won’t consider it? ‘Wossing’ out? Momentum?

    54. Juany8

      All you really need to know about D’Antoni is that he got the same results with Nash, Amar’e, and an in his prime Shawn Marion as Alvin Gentry did with Nash, Amar’e, and a super old Grant Hill. In my opinion Nash was the best offensive player in NBA history. When he had the ball in his hands, his teams scored better than anyone, period. From 2000 to 2011 (after which Robert Saver let Amar’e walk so he could overpay guys like Josh Childress and Channing Frye) Nash’s teams were either ranked first or second in the NBA. A straight decade of being amazing offensively, from back when he was on the Mavs all the way through the WCF run with Alving Gentry.

      If your offensive philosophy is to give the ball to the point guard and spread the floor to give him room, you’re going to look pretty awesome when Steve Nash is on your team. Doesn’t make you any good as a coach, and I’ll never understand why some Knicks fans are so keen to defend him when he was so spectacularly bad at managing egos here. He wanted to trade Carmelo for Deron Williams guys, and I’d personally rather not have a coach that’s going to give Felton the green light to take all the quick shots he wants (oh yea remember when Felton had an absurd usage WITH D’Antoni on the Knicks?) but hey, let’s make excuses for why he tried to stick Pau Gasol on the 3 point line this year.

    55. jon abbey

      DRed:
      ruru, if we’re talking about D’Antoni’s performance this year, it’s irrelevant how talented the Lakers are when healthy, because they haven’t been.

      they had a terrible record with everyone healthy, though, something like 6-13.

    56. Kurt

      A few responses:
      Don’t usually agree with THCJ but definitely do for Kobe. Whatever you say about “The Decision” LBJ is not a jerk on a personal level like Kobe is. Just about all teammates love playing with LBJ, certainly NOT the case for Kobe.
      Even among NBA “stars,” there are a number of whom seem like good people in person: I’m biased towards Amar’e, but by all accounts Durant is a genuinely good person, despite his “Sasha Fierce” shtick these days.
      I think D’Antoni was clearly influential regarding offense in the NBA: as one person mentioned above, Coach Pop has credited D’Antoni with much of the Spurs’ current offense. Nowadays, all good offenses (with partial exception of the Thunder) make spacing and ball movement their primary principles.
      But even in Phoenix, his flaws did him in. For example, I think if he hadn’t worn down Nash and his other top players during the season, they would’ve been more likely to win in the playoffs.
      As others have mentioned, he was really bad at in-game adjustments, communication with his players, and getting consistent effort, as well as coaching for the season rather than each game.
      That being said, I agree with the comment that he’s not as ridged as most assume considering that the Laker’s are using a lot of Horns sets this year.
      But I think a lot of his success came from his spacing principles, and, someone else mentioned, once the rest of the league caught up to him, he hasn’t been able to do all the little things necessary to stay ahead within the league like Coach Pop (speaking of which, he’s exhibit A of a coach changing his system to match his talent).

    57. BigBlueAL

      Brian Cronin:
      Yeah, my name being on the front page was funny, as if someone’s actually going to go “Oh, Brian Cronin wrote it? Now I have to read it!”

      It worked with me!! lmao

    58. Juany8

      Brian Cronin:
      Yeah, my name being on the front page was funny, as if someone’s actually going to go “Oh, Brian Cronin wrote it? Now I have to read it!”

      Nice article Brian! It definitely would have made me want to open it if I saw your name up there haha

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