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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Knicks Morning News (Monday, Jun 03 2013)

  • [New York Times] On Pro Basketball: An Unsettling Moment of Truth for the Heat (Mon, 03 Jun 2013 02:01:40 GMT)
    The Heat’s title defense is dependent on Dwyane Wade’s wobbly knee, Chris Bosh’s wilting confidence and LeBron James’s apparently wavering faith in his struggling co-stars.    

  • 14 comments on “Knicks Morning News (Monday, Jun 03 2013)

    1. Frank O.

      I caught a lot of flack during the Knicks series when I defended a hurt Chandler because of what Hibbert was doing. I said then folks simply refused to see Hibbert’s emergence as the kind of dominant center many believed he could be.
      At 7’2′, 40 pounds heavier than Chandler, and with great footwork and a very hard to defend baby hook he used with both hands, as well as sterling, smart D, he shows how a strong, big center can alter the game. Not sure he can alter the paradigm of the dominant wing player, but his play has been amazing.

      On the other hand, the Pacers, a good, but flawed team, is taking advantage of wounded teams. The knicks had Chandler, Melo and JR injured and Amare recovering. The Heat have two of their three superstars injured. Meanwhile, the Pacers, down an aging Granger, are in much better shape.

    2. johnno

      Frank O.: On the other hand, the Pacers, a good, but flawed team, is taking advantage of wounded teams. The knicks had Chandler, Melo and JR injured and Amare recovering. The Heat have two of their three superstars injured. Meanwhile, the Pacers, down an aging Granger, are in much better shape.

      Aside from Granger, the Pacers have been unbelievably healthy over the last two seasons.
      On another note, I see a rumor that the Knicks might be interested in this guy Gani Lawal. I know nothing about him, so I find a youtube clip to see what he looks like. The very first highlight is of him hitting a shot and then jogging back downcourt while complaining to the ref that he was fouled. Looks like he’d fit right in…

    3. Hubert

      johnno:
      Woodson got trashed on this board for refusing to go “small ball” against the Pacers, trying to match their size, forgetting that he had scorers on the bench and double teaming Hibbert.Last night, until late in the third quarter (and for pretty much the entire series), Spoelstra forgot that he had Mike Miller on the bench, he pretty much forgot that he had Shane Battier on the team, he double teamed Hibbert consistently, &he brought Joel Anthony back from the dead because he was trying to match the Pacers’ size and his “small ball” center Chris Bosh was being obliterated by Hibbert.Which leads to one of two conclusions — either Spoelstra is as dumb as Woodson or the Pacers are pretty darned good.

      You make a fair point. This series is demonstrating how hard it is to go small against Indiana.

      But I don’t think you’re being fair to Spoelstra. He’s gone with small ball for most of this series, and he doesn’t need Mike Miller to go small. But as the series has progressed he has begun to use more Birdman + Bosh, or Haslem + Bosh lineups.

      The Heat’s problem has been the guys they need to play effective small ball (Battier, Allen, Wade, Bosh) have been terrible.

      This series is making Woodson look both smart and silly, if that’s possible. On the one hand, even Miami is bending to Indiana’s size dominance, so Woodson’s freak out seems less egregious. On the other hand, Miami’s best performances have always been when they go small, which seems to indicate that we should have attempted it at least for stretches to gain an advantage.

      At the very least, no one should be screaming for Woodson to be fired any more. That’s a very difficult team to match up against, especially when your two best players have a torn labrum and a herniated disc.

    4. Hubert

      The other HUGE thing about this series, by the way? Miami ain’t so bad. I really think if we bring the same team + Woodson back next year and are able to stay healthy, we can win the East. But it will require better minutes management during the regular season. I always suspected that pushing for the 2 seed while every one else was resting could have a negative effect. And in that 79th game when we were playing Indiana for home court, they pretty much spent the whole game obviously trying to injure Carmelo Anthony, and Woodson left him in long enough for the strategy to be successful.

      But we were really close this year. And I don’t buy that it’s going to be harder next year because Rose and Rondo are back. The Celtics will continue to slide. I doubt they will ever contend again.

      And yeah, Rose being back means the Bulls will be better (if they’re healthy in the playoffs, which is unlikely). But if we have to face them, it means we won’t be facing either Miami or Indiana. You’re going to have to beat two really good teams to win the East. Doesn’t matter if it’s Chicago and Miami, Indiana and Miami, or Chicago and Indiana. You have to beat 2. Not all 3.

    5. flossy

      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324423904578521300625742018?mg=reno64-wsj.html?dsk=y

      Very interesting article in the WSJ saying the Knicks should ask Stoudemire to spend the summer working on his 3 point shot from the corners.

      I’ve been thinking the same thing recently. Obviously Amar’e can thrive as the focal point of an offense–when healthy he is still one of the best PnR dive men in the game and his newfound post game has allowed him to replace inefficient face-up ISO possessions with hyper-efficient post-ups.

      However, he’s still an imperfect fit in an offense that has been shown to work well in a 4-out configuration. If he could hit even mid-30% of 2 or 3 corner 3s per 36, it would open up the floor a LOT and allow him to help the team on offense even without the ball in his hands. I’m not suggesting he become strictly a stretch-4, but being able to space the floor out a bit or punish teams for leaving him alone in the corner would make him a top 5 offensive player in the league IMO.

      Per Herring, STAT has apparently gone 145-of-268 (54%) on 2 pointers from 20′ or farther over the past six seasons, which leads the league by a lot and suggests he could extend his range another foot or two if he focused on corner 3s.

    6. johnno

      Hubert: But I don’t think you’re being fair to Spoelstra. He’s gone with small ball for most of this series, and he doesn’t need Mike Miller to go small. But as the series has progressed he has begun to use more Birdman + Bosh, or Haslem + Bosh lineups.

      My post wasn’t particularly well-written. I wasn’t criticizing Spoelstra at all. I think that most of the criticism of Woodson is unfair, much the same as I think that it would be unfair to criticize Spoelstra. Biosh and Wade have been awful, much the same as JR was terrible and Chandler was not recovered from his injury. If JR and Chandler played well, the Knicks probably would have beaten the Pacers. If Bosh and Wade played well, the series would already be over.

    7. johnno

      flossy: Per Herring, STAT has apparently gone 145-of-268 (54%) on 2 pointers from 20? or farther over the past six seasons, which leads the league by a lot

      Boy I wish the he could stay healthy. He really is a truly phenomenal offensive talent.

    8. Frank

      flossy: Per Herring, STAT has apparently gone 145-of-268 (54%) on 2 pointers from 20? or farther over the past six seasons, which leads the league by a lot and suggests he could extend his range another foot or two if he focused on corner 3s.

      Yeah, I read that too but I almost feel like that has to be a mistake. In fact, I remember Goldsberry showing that from certain mid-long range areas, Amare was the worst shooter in the league. I know that goes back 6 seasons, wonder what it has been while in a Knick uniform. His last 3 years in PHX hoopdata says he shot 48, 46, and 42% from 16-23 feet, but those #s have been much worse in NY (44, 35, and 42).

      That being said, of course Amare should work like crazy on the corner and wing 3. If I’m Amare, I see myself becoming irrelevant. I see myself being referred to as the worst contract in basketball. If I’m Amare, I’m doing everything possible to make myself into a superstar again. If Amare can again be an elite pick and roll (or pop) player (1.27 PPP this past year, 11th in the league), an elite post scorer, and shoot 3′s, then, well, pretty much he’s an elite offensive player.

      If he plays with a big that can protect his lapses in defense, he can still be a really valuable player. If he can stay healthy. If.

    9. Hubert

      flossy:
      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324423904578521300625742018?mg=reno64-wsj.html?dsk=y

      Very interesting article in the WSJ saying the Knicks should ask Stoudemire to spend the summer working on his 3 point shot from the corners.

      I’ve been thinking the same thing recently.Obviously Amar’e can thrive as the focal point of an offense–when healthy he is still one of the best PnR dive men in the game and his newfound post game has allowed him to replace inefficient face-up ISO possessions with hyper-efficient post-ups.

      However, he’s still an imperfect fit in an offense that has been shown to work well in a 4-out configuration.If he could hit even mid-30% of 2 or 3 corner 3s per 36, it would open up the floor a LOT and allow him to help the team on offense even without the ball in his hands.I’m not suggesting he become strictly a stretch-4, but being able to space the floor out a bit or punish teams for leaving him alone in the corner would make him a top 5 offensive player in the league IMO.

      Per Herring, STAT has apparently gone 145-of-268 (54%) on 2 pointers from 20? or farther over the past six seasons, which leads the league by a lot and suggests he could extend his range another foot or two if he focused on corner 3s.

      Amar’e shooting corner 3′s just seems like a gross misuse of talent. I’d rather Woodson spend the summer working on how to incorporate his already elite offensive game into our offense.

    10. Frank O.

      Do you realize how tough STAT would be to guard if he developed a consistent three point shot?
      He’s 6’10, strong and a threat to drive or post. If he could shoot the three, OMG. My only fear is his ball handling.
      I think one of the best things Amare could do is to learn how to dribble with more control.
      He would have a Nowitzki kind of game if he could hit the three consistently…

    11. Frank O.

      Frank O.:
      Do you realize how tough STAT would be to guard if he developed a consistent three point shot?
      He’s 6’10, strong and a threat to drive or post. If he could shoot the three, OMG. My only fear is his ball handling.
      I think one of the best things Amare could do is to learn how to dribble with more control.
      He would have a Nowitzki kind of game if he could hit the three consistently…

      Well, maybe not Nowitzki

    12. Frank

      Hubert: Amar’e shooting corner 3?s just seems like a gross misuse of talent.I’d rather Woodson spend the summer working on how to incorporate his already elite offensive game into our offense.

      If he can shoot 35-40% from the corner 3, there is basically no better use of his talent as that equates to a 1.05-1.2 PPP shot – ie. elite efficiency. And that’s not even counting the side benefits of him taking that shot:
      1) he’s not dribbling
      2) he’s unlikely to turn it over
      3) the ball won’t end up in Melo’s hands for a contested long 2 with 3 seconds left on the clock
      4) since he is 6’10″ his ability to shoot the corner 3 will pull opposing bigs from the basket (and away from our main action, which is Tyson rolling to the hoop)
      5) standing in the corner will also open up baseline cuts to him – he’s an underrated cutter

      There is literally zero reason for Amare NOT to practice that shot especially since he’s already a pretty good shooter.

    13. Hubert

      I’m not saying you’re wrong. It would be fantastic if he could be a great 3 point shooter.

      I’m just saying I don’t expect him to become a 35-40% 3 point shooter at age 31. It’s not that easy to add things to your game late in your career and instantly become really good at them.

      In 2012, he seemed to lose his elbow jumper completely. I don’t know why he’d be better shooting longer distance. I’d venture if we went that route, he’d shoot about 25-28%, and that’s not good enough to take him out of positions where he’s highly effective.

    14. Brian Cronin

      Hehe, I like that the #1 side benefit is him not dribbling. It’s funny because it’s true.

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