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Friday, August 1, 2014

Knicks Morning News (Friday, Feb 10 2012)

  • [New York Daily News] City in grips of â??Lin-sanity,’ALL but his jerseys are scarce  (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 07:47:26 GMT)
    After legions of Knicks fans cried foul for days over the crushing absence of Jeremy Lin jerseys, city stores on Friday are slated to receive their first batch of gear emblazoned with the name of the NBA’s newest sensation.

  • [New York Daily News] Mighty Lin gets ready to face Kobe, Lakers (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 07:23:08 GMT)
    Kobe Bryant is always a threat to go for 50, 60, maybe even 70 points when he makes his yearly pilgrimage to Madison Square Garden. “Kobe will be looking to light up the Garden as he usually does,â? Mike D’Antoni says.

  • [New York Daily News] In first two starts, Lin’s stats beat Jordan, LeBron and Kobe (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 07:07:11 GMT)
    Maybe you haven’t noticed, but Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin, the Chinese-American phenom out of Harvard, is gaining quite a bit of attention. He is sweeping the NBA, one game at a time.

  • [New York Post] Bryant, Lakers next for Lin’s gang (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:54:31 -0500)
    When Jeremy Lin used to enter the Garden during his first weeks as a Knick, arena security didn’t believe he was a player. They mistook him for one of the trainers. Lin had to talk his way through the player’s entrance, according to his agent Roger Montgomery.
    Now…

  • [New York Post] Garden falls in love with surprising star (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:27:09 -0500)
    The tickets were up in the old blue seats at the Garden. This was opening night for the Knicks, Oct. 27, 1984, and we had taken the train in to scream like Beatlemaniacs for Bernard King, to heckle the hell out of Isiah Thomas, Kelly Tripucka, Kent Benson and the…

  • [New York Post] A shot & a prayer (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:54:31 -0500)
    On a freezing-cold night in early January, Jeremy Lin sits anonymously in an upper row of bleachers at Fordham’s Rose Hill Gym, hunching slightly toward the court, clad in a ski jacket and sweatpants and still cloaked in relative obscurity.
    Though he has been picked up recently off waivers…

  • [New York Post] Star bids elude Tyson and Amar’e (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:45:23 -0500)
    Amar’e Stoudemire and Tyson Chandler were left off the Eastern Conference’s All-Star team when reserves were announced last night.
    The Knicks’ sub-.500 record (11-15) killed their chances. Only Carmelo Anthony will represent the Knicks as a starting forward on Feb. 26 in Orlando.
    Chandler has still not…

  • [New York Post] Rockets GM: I should’ve kept Jeremy (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:45:23 -0500)
    Rockets general manager Daryl Morey took to Twitter yesterday to express his regret over letting Jeremy Lin go earlier this season.
    “We should have kept [Jeremy Lin]. Did not know he was this good,â? Morey said on his official Twitter feed while answering questions from fans. “Anyone who says they…

  • [New York Post] Jerseys are all the rage (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:45:23 -0500)
    Jeremy Lin’s incredible and meteoric rise from a bench-warming backup point guard to a nationwide sensation has local retailers scrambling to try to stock their shelves with his No. 17 Knicks jersey. But if you want to wear one to watch Lin and the Knicks take on the Lakers…

  • [New York Times] Jeremy Lin’s Success With Knicks Surprises Everyone (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 06:23:17 GMT)
    All 30 N.B.A. teams passed on point guard Jeremy Lin in the draft, some of them twice, and now he’s leading the Knicks.

  • [New York Times] Magic Trying to Sell Howard on Staying Put (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 06:23:32 GMT)
    Dwight Howard wants to play in a larger market and has demanded a trade from Orlando. The Magic’s owner, Rich DeVos, and the team have not given up hope.

  • [New York Times] Coaches Agree, in Jeremy Lin, Knicks Unearth a Diamond (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 06:16:27 GMT)
    A selection of basketball coaches chime in on the recent, surprising success of the Knicks’ point guard Jeremy Lin.

  • [New York Times] N.B.A. Roundup: Gasol’s Blocked Shot Seals Lakers’ Victory in Boston (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 06:23:55 GMT)
    Pau Gasol blocked Ray Allen’s putback attempt at the buzzer in overtime, and visiting Los Angeles defeated the Celtics, 88-87.

  • [New York Times] Lakers Cool Red-Hot Celtics in OT Scrap (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 07:56:00 GMT)
    Pau Gasol came up big for the Los Angeles Lakers as they beat the red-hot Boston Celtics 88-87 in overtime for a rare road win on Thursday.

  • [New York Times] Tyreke Evans Leads Kings Past Thunder (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 06:42:43 GMT)
    Tyreke Evans scored 22 points, DeMarcus Cousins had 19 points and nine rebounds and the Sacramento Kings rallied to beat Oklahoma City 106-101 on Thursday night, dropping the Thunder to second overall in the NBA.

  • [New York Times] Jeremy Lin’s Emergence Ignites Scramble to Retail His Jersey (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 10:54:04 GMT)
    The spectacular play of Knicks’ guard Jeremy Lin was so unexpected that authorized sellers of team merchandise, and even black market vendors, had none to offer.

  • [New York Times] Warriors Hand Nuggets 5th Straight Loss, 109-101 (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:33:44 GMT)
    Stephen Curry scored a season-best 36 points and the Golden State Warriors handed the fading Denver Nuggets their fifth straight loss, 109-101 on Thursday night.

  • [New York Times] Lakers Cool Red-Hot Celtics in Overtime (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:28:56 GMT)
    Pau Gasol came up big for the Los Angeles Lakers as they beat the red-hot Boston Celtics 88-87 in overtime for a rare road win on Thursday.

  • [New York Times] Scola Helps Rockets Top Suns 96-89 (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:42:33 GMT)
    Luis Scola scored 16 points, Patrick Patterson added 14 and the Houston Rockets outlasted the Phoenix Suns 96-89 on Thursday night.

  • [New York Times] Gasol: 25 Pts, 14 Reb, Key Block in 88-87 Win (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 10:36:40 GMT)
    Pau Gasol blocked Ray Allen’s putback attempt at the buzzer in overtime and the Los Angeles Lakers held on to beat the Boston Celtics 88-87 on Thursday night.

  • [New York Times] For Doc Rivers, Watching Son Play Means Less Worry (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 01:45:33 GMT)
    Los Angeles Lakers coach Mike Brown walked past the crowd of reporters huddled outside the Celtics’ locker room and thought, briefly, about joining in.

  • [New York Times] Column: LeBron Only No. 6 on Least-Liked List? (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 00:48:30 GMT)
    Nineteen months after “The Decision” sent his personal stock plummeting, LeBron James is as desperate as ever to please and still clueless on how to go about it.

  • [New York Times] Dirk, Pierce All-Stars; Runs End for KG, Duncan (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 01:27:36 GMT)
    Dirk Nowitzki and Paul Pierce overcame slow starts to return to the All-Star game, while lengthy runs ended for Kevin Garnett and Tim Duncan.

  • [New York Times] Off the Dribble: Nerdy Greeting Really a Smart Shake (Fri, 10 Feb 2012 04:29:50 GMT)
    Jeremy Lin and Landry Fields debuted a new handshake this week that appears to be a nod to the fact that they both attended hallowed educational institutions.

  • 35 comments on “Knicks Morning News (Friday, Feb 10 2012)

    1. Matt Smith

      Thanks for being on point with these, Mike. It’s great to always have a go-to source for my constant need for Knicks/NBA info.

      I also wanted to say I’m fairly disappointed at some of the comments directed at yesterday’s article (some of which have now been deleted). Frequenters of KB have every right to criticize someone’s writing, but I don’t think it’s asking much to do so constructively. Leave the bashing to other *cough*inferior*cough* sites; I’d like to keep our ivory tower clean. In all seriousness, one of the reasons I check the comments here is because this community can maintain a high-level dialogue while simultaneously upholding a high regard to decency (with the exception of a few commenters). Everyone has to start writing somewhere, so next time try to help an author improve instead of being obnoxious.

      Keep it classy, KB.

    2. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      I actually made a list of the things I found wrong with the article, which were many. From a low level of analysis to the use of archaic stats to stating the obvious, I found it to be the worst article I’ve seen on this site. I, for one, think that this site sometimes exhibits the highest level of short-form sportwriting on the net.

    3. jon abbey

      yeah, I did the same thing last time he wrote a piece. when THCJ and I agree on something, you know that both pigs are flying and maybe we’re right.

    4. Frank O.

      I think standards of excellence are important. But I also think that it’s too easy, too impersonal, in this kind of setting to say things are are tantamount to bullying because you’re not facing the individual.

      I’ve been a reporter and editor for 23 years. I have seen editors who are as blunt as Jon abbey, or cock, and sometimes having that kind of edge is useful in a newsroom context. Nothing quite like fear to ensure people back up their statements with facts.

      But, personally, I believe in nurturing young people, encouraging them to develop their skills. At some point the last time this writer got shredded, someone, and it might have been Jon, actually offered some sound advice. This is, I believe, a college kid. Jon wrote for Time, Jim contributes to the Times and elsewhere, Mike feeds Espn and Bob is, well, Bob. Context is important.

      Last point, this site has editors. Copy doesn’t just appear. So, some of the “blame” must reside with the editor. If I allow an article that makes somewhat flat statements, unsupported commentary, or overly simplistic themes, I’m responsible. I am quality control.

      Keep that in mind.

      The kid wrote something. Respectfully, it wasn’t well thought out or well presented. Allowing the copy to appear in that form was tantamount to throwing the kid to them wolves. The web is a harsh place.
      But he told us last time he was in college and learning. It might be more constructive for the editor to kick it back to him and say, think about this, this, and this. And by the way, writing about basketball is fun.

      Make an argument, build it on facts, and have some fun.

      Perhaps if more people did that, there’d be fewer people acting as pricks in the future. There’s plenty of blame to go around here, IMHO.

    5. Frank O.

      I’m a little surprised at the level of disbelief people have in what their eyes are telling them.
      Lin’s left isn’t as strong as his right. But he has controlled the Knicks’ offense for a lot of minutes through three games, and his turnover rate is low. Teams have tried to attack his left hand, and the opposing guards have gotten into foul trouble. In the last three games, each of these teams have been in the penalty rather quickly.
      John Stockton played a simple game, and it made him into a hall of famer. Penetration, pick and roll, bounce passes in traffic, jumpers, and bank shots work.
      I always wondered why people got away from the under hand foul shot. My stepfather was a much older man, he was born in 1909, and he always wondered why the foul shot changed. Underhand is actually easier. In basketball, people shoot over their heads because of defenders. On the line, there are no defenders.
      I believe the quality of the NBA has improved because foreign players with sound fundamentals broke in and have changed the game.
      It’s nice to see an American player doing sound fundamental things.
      Lin is for real, and he will get better. He is deceptive, and he’s making the Knicks bench look far more formidable than any of us believed.
      Does anyone really believe, like Chandler, that Lin will help Amare and Melo feast? Lin won’t need to score 25 when those guys are back, but opposing teams know he can, and that is the beauty of the PnR or the creativity that penetration fosters.
      My predictions: Both Amare and Melo will shoot better than 50 percent from the field and with their trips to the line their advanced stats also will jump; the Knicks pace will pick up; their points per possession will significantly improve; and their offense will be ranked in the top 10 in the NBA. Oh, and Lin will average 11 assists per game.
      Heady stuff. I believe what my eyes are seeing.

    6. Matt Smith

      Jon, I have no issues with the fact that you didn’t like the article, just with how you went about criticizing it. Again, you have every right to criticize it whatever way you want, but I think it would be more prudent to either a) point out what you don’t like so the author knows what to fix or b) proactively comment on how the author can fix problems in the article. I’m not trying to defend the quality of the article here, but I think the site would be better off if your critique consisted of more than blanket ad-hom statements (ie: that the article was posted here has to be related to some form of nepotism). That said, this was just one instance; as a whole, I’m not saying your comments are immature/unhelpful (I enjoy most of them).

      THCJ, your comment was deleted before I could read it, so I’m admitting I’m making assumptions based on both your past posts and the fact that one of our (usually very good) editors found it caustic. I don’t think the issue with your comments is on-topic content; I think normally your analysis is fairly poignant. The problem is, from what I’ve read, your arguments are normally couched in needlessly combative rhetoric that distracts readers from the point and, more often than not, leads them to reply with off-topic and overly-emotional comments. That has been the trend with replies to a good number of your posts, from my experience. I’m not going to determine whether that’s fair or not for you. However, I do think that if you neutralized your writing to where you just focus on analysis, I think the quality of the replies to your posts would improve drastically.

      Anyway, that’s my 2c. I’m certainly not immune to making unintelligent posts or succumbing to poor writing, but I wanted to comment on how I think we can improve the quality of both articles and comments. What differentiates KB, I think, is how we’re able to approach out-of-game analysis with a level head.

    7. Matt Smith

      That said, I do enjoy how, like proper New Yorkers, we turn into absolute raving lunatics during games, ready to jump the gun with essentiallizing statements at the drop of a hat.

      Also, well said, Frank.

    8. Gideon Zaga

      Best quote of today: Carmelo Anthony is not an Elite NBA player, he is an Elite NBA scorer. Just like Kevin Durant and also an Elite NBA rebounder Kevin Love. There so many unidimensional players in the NBA, one can say Amare is an Elite p&r man, TC is an elite NBA finisher. Its interesting to see how people make arguments when things dont seem to work out. On a side note anyone still got some info on a knick podcast.

    9. Mulligan

      I believe this was in an sbnation article I linked to a few posts ago (not able to find it now), but one of the observations the writer made was that, unlike most pg’s, Lin first accelerates past the pick and then slows down to find the right angle. Most pg’s do the opposite and Lin really throws off the defender by reversing it (the writer also noted that CP3 does this as well). I haven’t observed this myself (just not that astute of a bball watcher) but I love little observations like this. Actually gives a concrete example of what Lin  might be doing that is “real” skill as opposed to a fluke.

    10. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      I’m all for nurturing young writers. It’s what I do for a living, and it’s clear from my student evaluations at the end of each semester that I foster an environment of growth.

      But my students aren’t posting on a well-established blog that is (and wants to be) known for its high quality of writing. I often recommend my students to publish to our university’s first-year composition journal (nicely bound and such), but I don’t recommend it to students that write poorly, without insight, etc. I’m all for this guy practicing his writing, but there are at least a handful of posters on this site who could contribute better than he could right now. I guess my attitude is that there are sites like Bleacher Report where people can be published for “practice.” If you ask me, that article wasn’t up to par for this site, which I will repeat ad nauseam is among the best written sites on the interwebs.

    11. The Honorable Cock Jowles

      Gideon Zaga:
      Best quote of today: Carmelo Anthony is not an Elite NBA player, he is an Elite NBA scorer. Just like Kevin Durant and also an Elite NBA rebounder Kevin Love. There so many unidimensional players in the NBA, one can say Amare is an Elite p&r man, TC is an elite NBA finisher. Its interesting to see how people make arguments when things dont seem to work out. On a side note anyone still got some info on a knick podcast.

      See, it’s posts like this that irk me. How is Kevin Love one-dimensional?

    12. Gideon Zaga

      I didn’t mean to say he is one dimensional or do i even think that but, based on the argument, he is apparently not an elite NBA player but an Elite NBA rebounder.

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: See, it’s posts like this that irk me. How is Kevin Love one-dimensional?

    13. Frank O.

      The Honorable Cock Jowles:
      I’m all for nurturing young writers. It’s what I do for a living, and it’s clear from my student evaluations at the end of each semester that I foster an environment of growth.

      But my students aren’t posting on a well-established blog that is (and wants to be) known for its high quality of writing. I often recommend my students to publish to our university’s first-year composition journal (nicely bound and such), but I don’t recommend it to students that write poorly, without insight, etc. I’m all for this guy practicing his writing, but there are at least a handful of posters on this site who could contribute better than he could right now. I guess my attitude is that there are sites like Bleacher Report where people can be published for “practice.” If you ask me, that article wasn’t up to par for this site, which I will repeat ad nauseam is among the best written sites on the interwebs.

      No dispute there. It’s why I mentioned his editor should also bear some responsibility for the product. You are one of the wolves, sir. Lol

    14. rururuland2

      Mulligan:
      I believe this was in an sbnation article I linked to a few posts ago (not able to find it now), but one of the observations the writer made was that, unlike most pg’s, Lin first accelerates past the pick and then slows down to find the right angle. Most pg’s do the opposite and Lin really throws off the defender by reversing it (the writer also noted that CP3 does this as well). I haven’t observed this myself (just not that astute of a bball watcher) but I love little observations like this. Actually gives a concrete example of what Lin might be doing that is “real” skill as opposed to a fluke.

      that’s an outstanding observation.

      Probing. Nash does it better than anyone. Paul, too, and one of the most underrated aspects of his game is his ability to keep his dribble alive inside the ft line area. He has great strength and a great handle.

    15. Frank O.

      The Honorable Cock Jowles: See, it’s posts like this that irk me. How is Kevin Love one-dimensional?

      Indeed, the man rebounds, scores from lots of places on the floor and occasionally stomps on people’s faces. Clear, multi-dimensional. He is a top-flight forward.

    16. Brian Cronin

      I’m all for nurturing young writers. It’s what I do for a living, and it’s clear from my student evaluations at the end of each semester that I foster an environment of growth.

      But my students aren’t posting on a well-established blog that is (and wants to be) known for its high quality of writing. I often recommend my students to publish to our university’s first-year composition journal (nicely bound and such), but I don’t recommend it to students that write poorly, without insight, etc. I’m all for this guy practicing his writing, but there are at least a handful of posters on this site who could contribute better than he could right now. I guess my attitude is that there are sites like Bleacher Report where people can be published for “practice.” If you ask me, that article wasn’t up to par for this site, which I will repeat ad nauseam is among the best written sites on the interwebs.

      For what it’s worth, if you had said something like that, there wouldn’t have been an issue. Like I said before, I don’t care if folks want to criticize articles. Go for it. Your comments, though, while I’m sure you intended them to be constructive, came off as unduly abrasive. Moreover, from the comments that popped up right after your comment, it was clear that we were headed towards a series of angry comments about your comment rather than any discussion of the piece itself, which I did not want (of course, admittedly, it has turned into such a discussion anyways).

    17. rururuland2

      Mulligan:
      From my post at #10, here’s the link to the article I cited. Thought it had a few interesting points about Lin’s game http://mobile.sbnation.com/nba/2012/2/9/2786323/jeremy-lin-new-york-knicks-scouting-report

      That’s really a fantastic piece. Aside from setting up his defender going into the screen, keeping him on his back and allowing passing angles to form, as the story mentioned, he has a very Tony Parker-like quality to finishing, the strength to get into the big’s body and an ability to finish, sometimes with English, at a variety of angles off the glass.

      Parker is incredible at that, and I think Lin has shown some skill in that regard that only a few pgs have.

      The more you exam the nuances of his skill set, the more you come away thinking that he really can become an elite point guard in this offense.

      I’m not all that concerned about his left (see: Rubio), but his slow-release might be the one thing that keeps from the upper-stratosphere of pgs.

    18. rururuland2

      Brian Cronin: For what it’s worth, if you had said something like that, there wouldn’t have been an issue. Like I said before, I don’t care if folks want to criticize articles. Go for it. Your comments, though, while I’m sure you intended them to be constructive, came off as unduly abrasive. Moreover, from the comments that popped up right after your comment, it was clear that we were headed towards a series of angry comments about your comment rather than any discussion of the piece itself, which I did not want (of course, admittedly, it has turned into such a discussion anyways).

      I’m new to this board but it seems THCJ is the lurking troll?

    19. Gideon Zaga

      Also in other News ESPN is hosting a viewing party in China for tonight’s Knick game, where they would also have dancers at Half time. The media and the NBAs marketinto machine is in full flight, hey at least we’re not the laughing stock of the NBA anymore. Now how long will it take for Nike to give this guy a shoe.

    20. villainx

      Don’t know what the dispute or controversy is about, but unless it’s writer owned blog, I almost always place heavy blame the editors. Why else are they there?

    21. Gideon Zaga

      At this rate, I say Dolan better resolve the TWC dispute and also have enough cash to pay whatever luxury tax we accrue from the signing of JR Smith and extending J Lin.

      Brian Cronin: He actually signed a deal with Nike last season.

    22. Gideon Zaga

      I don’t know about you guys but as much as the articles on here are important, the interactive commentary is the mvp of this blog. All I’m saying is much to-do about nothing, we root for the underdogs on our team. Why can’t we root for the underdog writers of this blog. Give the Kid a break.

    23. Frank O.

      I have had several friends of mine, whose opinions on basketball I respect, question my belief in Lin, and they cite the euphoria that came from Knicks’ fans when Shump had his great game, or when Mosgov managed 31 points last year.
      I think with Shump there always were deep suspicions that he could not sustain what he was doing. He’s never shown himself to be a great scorer. He’s rough. He makes obvious mistakes, but he has raw talent and a physique that will serve him well in position as a two.
      Lin was a decent scorer in college. I know people were wanting to see more of him earlier in the season because we saw flashes of his penetration skills in scrub time. TD’s collapse helped.
      But here is a taste of a random scouting report search on him:

      “Assets: A feisty, smart leader on the court. A superb passer who excels on the drive-and-dish: has nice moves getting to the hoop and keeps defenses honest with a solid outside shot. Very aware, does a great job poaching steals, and rebounds well for a point-man. Smooth, a deft ball-handler, very quick, and constantly hustling.”
      “Flaws: Somewhat limited as a man-to-man defender because of his average reach and less-than-explosive athleticism. Needs to keep refining his decision-making to limit turnovers.”

      Honestly, sounds like our guy, except I think his athleticism is off the charts in some ways and his decision making has been near impeccable. Not a huge leaper, but incredibly agile in space and in the air, and few turnovers. He’s also got a Duncan-like touch off the glass on drives.
      Small sample size, but TS % of .613 and an eFG% of .536 is pretty impressive and will get better as he gets stronger from the 3.
      In college he shot well over 50% from the field.
      I honestly think if this guy had played at Rucker park, or attended Duke, he might have been a late first rounder, early second guy because he’s a PG.

    24. rururuland2

      Frank, I looked at as many scouting reports as I could find after that first game, and there’s near unanimity on his attributes.

    25. jon abbey

      Matt:

      “Jon, I have no issues with the fact that you didn’t like the article, just with how you went about criticizing it. Again, you have every right to criticize it whatever way you want, but I think it would be more prudent to either a) point out what you don’t like so the author knows what to fix or b) proactively comment on how the author can fix problems in the article. ”

      I did that last time, and I put a fair amount of time into doing so. THCJ did that this time, and his post was deleted.

    26. Matt Smith

      Brian Cronin: For what it’s worth, if you had said something like that, there wouldn’t have been an issue. Like I said before, I don’t care if folks want to criticize articles. Go for it. Your comments, though, while I’m sure you intended them to be constructive, came off as unduly abrasive. Moreover, from the comments that popped up right after your comment, it was clear that we were headed towards a series of angry comments about your comment rather than any discussion of the piece itself, which I did not want (of course, admittedly, it has turned into such a discussion anyways).

      Spot-on, Brian. That’s what I was trying to get at with:

      The problem is, from what I’ve read, your arguments are normally couched in needlessly combative rhetoric that distracts readers from the point and, more often than not, leads them to reply with off-topic and overly-emotional comments. That has been the trend with replies to a good number of your posts, from my experience.)

      What THCJ just wrote was well-written, thoughtful, and free of spiteful/sardonic language, so it’s unlikely it will be followed by any flame wars. It’s the type of comment we need more of.

    27. Matt Smith

      Jon:

      That’s all well and good. Again, you should feel free to criticize if it’s done constructively. My point was that if THCJ did it already, you shouldn’t have felt the need to post what you did. I found that it was fairly obnoxious (see the ad-hom comment above), and more importantly, it didn’t add to the conversation.

    28. Matt Smith

      *Sorry for the triple post*

      I think we’re on the same page insofar as that criticism is warranted, and we all want to maintain the high quality of writing this site is known for.

      Jon, sorry for calling your comment obnoxious – I should’ve said unnecessary. I was getting hot-headed because the person who wrote the article happens to be related to me.

      Regardless, I think I’ve forced the conversation away from the Knicks too long for the day, and taken away too much productivity (including my own!) at work. Let’s get back to the x’s and o’s (plays, not kisses and hugs, please).

    29. Z

      jon abbey:
      yeah, I did the same thing last time he wrote a piece. when THCJ and I agree on something, you know that both pigs are flying and maybe we’re right.

      I remember that, but I don’t think it was the same writer. That was a self-admitted student who was doing game previews for a spell named Steven something.

      And I don’t quite understand the controversy swirling around yesterday’s piece. It wasn’t particularly useful, especially with all the other stuff that has been written about Lin this week (both here and abroad), but for me that was it’s worst sin. Not sure why it riled up the party faithful the way it did.

    30. Owen

      Z – A comment was taken down. That’s what the ruckus is about. But we seem to have discussed this all like adults and sorted things out more or less. It is interesting to watch the culture of a blog being formed and re-fashioned….

      “Best quote of today: Carmelo Anthony is not an Elite NBA player, he is an Elite NBA scorer. Just like Kevin Durant and also an Elite NBA rebounder Kevin Love. There so many unidimensional players in the NBA.”

      Kevin Love is scoring 25 points per game with a TS% of 58%. And his usage is up to 27.4%. Unidimensional is a strange word in this case….

      And to call Melo an Elite NBA scorer kind of gives short thrift to his lack of efficiency. When you are scoring at league average efficiency what’s so elite about that?

    31. Frank O.

      rururuland2: That’s really a fantastic piece. Aside from setting up his defender going into the screen, keeping him on his back and allowing passing angles to form, as the story mentioned, he has a very Tony Parker-like quality to finishing, the strength to get into the big’s body and an ability to finish, sometimes with English, at a variety of angles off the glass.

      Parker is incredible at that, and I think Lin has shown some skill in that regard that only a few pgs have.

      The more you exam the nuances of his skill set, the more you come away thinking that he really can become an elite point guard in this offense.

      I’m not all that concerned about his left (see: Rubio), but his slow-release might be the one thing that keeps from the upper-stratosphere of pgs.

      That story was a really good read. One thing, tho, it did to mention: a truncated season leaves teams little time to adjust to what they are going to face. Lin isn’t going to have too many teams spending a full day or two preparing for him. That bodes well for his play and for his development, to a certain degree.

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