Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Knicks 116, Lakers 107

New York Knicks 116 Final
Recap | Box Score
107 Los Angeles Lakers
Carmelo Anthony, SF 23 MIN | 10-15 FG | 7-8 FT | 3 REB | 0 AST | 30 PTS | +11

I’ve said it before and I pray to all that is holy and good and noble and decent that I’ll have the opportunity to say it again and again, but right now, Melo’s doing as good a job of replicating an in-his-prime Bernard King as we’ve seen in the NBA, with the added bonus of the deadly shot from downtown that Bernard never possessed. Alas, the comparison is so apt (How apt is it?), that once again, Knick Knation is in a combination semi-comatose/total panic awaiting the results of tests on his mangled knee/ankle, like Bernard, an injury suffered a drive to the tin. As of this writing, they’re calling the injury “mild” and tossing around the way too well-worn phrase ‘round these parts, “day-to-day.” Then again, if Chris Copeland suffered a debilitating brain aneurysm and needed a team of therapists just to teach him to eat with cutlery again, I’m sure the Knick hierarchy would call his incapacitation “day-to-day” too. So all our hopes and dreams rest in the ham-fisted, medieval mitts of good ‘old kindly Doc Roger Hinds. Outstanding. Friends, please sacrifice a virgin or a goat or even a virgin goat at the alter of whatever God or Gods suit your fancy.

Ronnie Brewer, SF 26 MIN | 3-6 FG | 0-0 FT | 2 REB | 2 AST | 6 PTS | -2

After a stretch of games where his wonky shot looked more fractured than normal, Brew brewed up (sorry) some swell defense during the first half when it looked like this game was going to be a laffer and provided a bucket or two when called upon.

Tyson Chandler, C 36 MIN | 5-5 FG | 8-14 FT | 4 REB | 0 AST | 18 PTS | +11

Tyson’s impact on the boards, if one scans the box score, might appear minimal/sub-par, but he did an unreal job blocking out/defending against Dwight Howard (P.S. Seriously, FUCK YOU DWIGHT.) even if more than a few non-D12 forum blue and gold’ers snaggled too many o-boards for my liking and during a critical stretch when Hollywood had managed to whittle a 26-point advantage down to a mere 6 with 1:27 remaining after two straight missed jumpers, Tyson Chandler dominated the offensive glass with two consecutive trademark soul-crushing backtaps to allow New York to control the ball for a game-sealing 1:09 of play. Combine that with his deadly finishes on the pick and roll and you get an affect-the-tides-sized, ginormous sack of beautiful. Just make the freebies, ‘kay Tyson. Please?

Jason Kidd, PG 39 MIN | 1-2 FG | 2-2 FT | 9 REB | 5 AST | 5 PTS | +10

Not too many killer treys from Jason Kidd, deadly outside marksman (Think about that for a moment. This is a cat who for years was dubbed, “Ason,” cause, you know, he had no J. Tee-hee.). But some yeoman work on the boards/defending his Kobe-ness and his zen-like calm in the face of a rapidly deteriorating lead are pretty much par for the course. Then again, if he’s going to be forced to log nearly 40 minutes a game, he’ll be ground to a pile of dust and bleeding head wounds and ill-fitting headbands and veteran leadership/mentoring by early February. That’s partly due to the fact that our next contestant…

Raymond Felton, PG 36 MIN | 9-26 FG | 1-2 FT | 3 REB | 8 AST | 19 PTS | +9

…played like a warmed-over, day old shit chalupa.

There’s a phrase that was popularized by Blazer-backers who enjoyed a full year of an in-less-than-optimal-physical-condition Felt last season: “Feltdown.” It’s when our man Ray would continue chucking contested mid-range shots and hurling off-balance layup attempts rimward no matter how many of his forays had failed over the course of the game and you find yourself bellowing, “DEAR GOD STOP SHOOTING, RAY!” at no one in particular. Welp, once Melo left, you could toddle down to a Social Club somewhere on Mulberry Street and place a wager with an Italianate fellow who’s menacingly sipping a finely-crafted espresso, insisting on a 100% vig and/or the breaking of femurs and whatnot and yet remain wholly confident of your chances of winning a bet that we’d get a Chernobyl-level collapse from our somewhat-less portly point (More on this later). It’s also a true fact that Felt has now attempted more shots than points scored this season. Gah. Eight dimes and only one turnover notwithstanding, any game where he fires more frequently than Kobe Bryant = Not good. Not good at all.

Rasheed Wallace, PF 12 MIN | 3-4 FG | 0-2 FT | 3 REB | 1 AST | 8 PTS | -2

‘Sheed got swept up in the tidal wave of overall brilliance of the first half, providing some stout rim-protecting in Tyson’s absence and even going so far as to nail a wrong-footed, step back, corner trey. He was far less effective in after intermission, but still, a solid outing in total.

J.R. Smith, SG 27 MIN | 7-14 FG | 2-2 FT | 3 REB | 2 AST | 18 PTS | +8

I guess all it took was a few sharp whacks of the lower lumbar to get Earl’s dickey shot back in proper working order. There were a couple of off-kilter, fadeaway heaves early in the shot clock, but for the most part, the last two games have seen the most-pleasant, massively-necessary return of “Good J.R.”

Steve Novak, SF 26 MIN | 4-5 FG | 0-0 FT | 3 REB | 4 AST | 12 PTS | +8

There’s a longer dissertation yet to be penned about the development from last year to this w/r/t Stevak’s shot. It’s geared, obvi, toward the playoffs, but even in an early season/relatively meaningless game such as this, you can see he’s still tinkering with a much quicker release. Tonight, he was dead-red, which was purty and everything, but the Angelenos posively vivisected him on the defensive end during their late run, sending Ebanks, World Peace, and pretty much whichever purple-clad baller right at him, to great effect.

Pablo Prigioni, PG 12 MIN | 0-0 FG | 0-0 FT | 3 REB | 1 AST | 0 PTS | 0

Did Prigs play? He did, right? I remember one swell pass to the corner and a couple of pesky, Pest™-y steals, but not much else. An eerily similar, equally invisible outing/line as Tuesday’s school trip to Kings County.

James White, SG 4 MIN | 0-1 FG | 0-0 FT | 0 REB | 1 AST | 0 PTS | -8

Hi James!

Five Things We Saw

  1. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of the wisdom of Jason Kidd and Rasheed Wallace, it was the age of the foolishness of Ray Felton and J.R. Smith, it was the epoch of belief that no matter what, Melo’s ungodly play would carry this team to the promised land, it was the epoch of incredulity that the unselfish play and unreal efficiency could last forever, it was the season of Light, as the Knickerbockers emerged from a decade of Despair, it was the season of Darkness as we prayed that the tendons in Melo’s ankle would be composed of pure adamantium, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. PLEASE BE OKAY, MELO
  2. Okay, I stole that from Dickens (Yes, Charles is worried about Melo, too. He’s fretting so much he’s gone through five tins of Gawith Hoggarth brand snuff), but tonight’s game was just as filled with contradictions as his famous opening paragraph to A Tale of Two Cities. For the first 30 minutes, the Knicks looked utterly unbeatable, forcing myriad turnovers, slinging the ball on a string to open three point shooters and throttling a back-spasming Mamba. Then, like Icarus, the Gods decided we were flying wayyyyyy too close to the sun and slashed our hubristic glee to shreds when, on a drive to the tin, that foul, giggling, churlish swine Dwight Howard hacked our savior and I really haven’t been able to get this acid-drenched knot out of my stomach ever since. PLEASE BE OKAY, MELO.
  3. Why did they semi-nearly (not really) blow this game? Aside from losing what is inarguably a top-three MVP candidate (And for once, those asinine chants of post-season hardware that inevitably rain down in a home team’s arena didn’t seem wholly premature.), a huge chunk of the blame has to fall on Felton’s shoulders. Even if the Lakers start switching on pick and rolls and downright presenting a laminated, calligraphic on like really good paper with a watermark and everything-type invitation to shoot, he can’t settle for mid range shots like he was throughout the fourth quarter. It’s exactly what happened in the first Brooklyn bout and the 2nd Miami game and the Chicago game and presumably will happen v. the Erie Knights on Saturday. Once Ray-Ray went off, the offense got stagnant, the defense stopped forcing turnovers (and, to be honest, LA was scoring at a decent clip even when Knicks were running on all cylinders on the offensive end.) and LA was able to chip away, slowly but surely. I want to grab a CIA/Darpa secret microchip that says “DRIVE” and install it in Ray’s brain. Maybe some snacks will distract him from my attempt at meatball/sci-fi surgery. Barring that, Woodson needs plant his ample tuchus to the pine and go with Prigs/Kidd at the point. There’s a stubbornness that seems to be hard-wired to this team’s DNA that is both a good and a bad thing. Son of Wood’s “Keep shooting” sage advice to J.R. is another prime example. It’s swell when they’re able to muster the intestinal fortitude to grind out victories in games they have no business winning, but when logic and boatloads of empirical evidence demand a change, I worry that they’re genetically incapable of adapting. To be continued. PLEASE BE OKAY, MELO.
  4. So much of the pre-game hype was about the return of Mike D’Antoni and his struggling squad and revenge and what level of “Two Minutes Hate” the denizens of MSG would rain down upon his mustachioed head, but not to sound like a bad breakup-er, it’s not about you, Mike. I’d only seen drips and drabs of the Lake Show until now, but hoo-boy, are they a mess. They can’t defend the pick and roll, get back in transition, close out on three-point shooters or stop dribble penetration. For all the anecdotal and mainly false historical narratives about D’Antoni’s teams’ lack of resistance, the Lakers’ lack of speed, size and general effort would make it hard for a Mensa-level defensive savant like Tom Thibodeau to cobble together an effective unit. Plus, that’s no Seven Seconds or Less. I know Seven Seconds or Less, I’ve served in Congress with Seven Seconds or Less, and you, Sir, are no Lloyd Bentsen. Granted, we saw how atrocious an offense that revolves around superlative point guard play can be in the hands of Toney Douglas, Mike Bibby and now Chris Duhon (Hi Chris!). Nash will resolve a lot of these issues but there’s no one on that team that thrives either in transition or in an uptempo attack. It’s going to be a loooong season in Cali. PLEASE BE OKAY, MELO.
  5. In other forms of performed entertainment, there’s a general rule that in the midst of a devastating bit of tragedy, it’s good to insert one or two dashes of comedy (and vice-versa). The thought being that the levity increases the profundity of one’s misery, like digging an even deeper valley to increase the perceived height of a mountain. With that in mind, in closing, here’s STAT playing peekaboo with a nattily-dressed Steve Nash and in honor of our lads’ continued shooting prowess, here’s the photo that hung in my room above my bed from 1988-1991. Nobody beats the Wiz (as opposed to the Wizards).

    PLEASE BE OKAY, MELO.

34 comments on “Knicks 116, Lakers 107

  1. thenoblefacehumper

    You never know about “day-to-day” with us, but Melo’s demeanor after the game seemed to indicate he’s okay. But hey, I’m no body language analyst (is that even a thing?). He should definitely sit out on Saturday.

  2. ruruland

    Jeremy Lin happened to Anthony last winter, and in the heat of Linsanity, “Everybody said, ‘well, they’re better without Carmelo’ and all this nonsense,” Bryant told reporters. “You guys really put the hammer on him and as a result, he kind of got a little gun shy and a little self-conscious about things.

    “I asked him, ‘What’s going on? What the hell are you doing?’ I said, ‘Do what you do best,’ and I think the organization put pieces around him that allowed him to do that. Now you guys all celebrate him for what he’s always done. God bless you guys.”

    I wanted to beat them. I wanted to beat the Lakers, especially protecting our home court. It had nothing to do with Mike.”

    Only it had everything to do with Mike. Before the game, D’Antoni would shower Anthony with praise, call him “as dangerous as you can get” as a power forward and scorer, and yet the loser in the latest NBA power struggle between coach and star kept taking something back, kept talking up the veteran talent the Knicks added to Melo’s side.
    Especially the point guards. D’Antoni said the biggest difference in Anthony this year as opposed to last is the presence of Raymond Felton and Jason Kidd, quarterbacks who know how to get their man the ball. D’Antoni seemed to forget he had a point guard last year who only became one of the most recognizable people on the planet.
    Of course, the very conductor of Linsanity had no choice but to embrace this article of faith. If he were to credit Melo for Melo’s enhanced play, rather than Felton/Kidd, he would also be acknowledging that Woodson inspired his best player to ascend to a level of performance Melo rarely approached under D’Antoni.

    So it was better for the visiting coach to try to shine a spotlight on Glen Grunwald’s complementary acquisitions…….

  3. BigBlueAL

    Quoting “A Tale of Two Cities” reminds me of a Cheers episode when Frasier reads the book to Norm, Cliff and Carla. Funny stuff.

    All this talk about Bernard King makes me wish I was born a few years younger than I was so I wouldve been able to have watched him as a little kid. I can remember everything about watching the Yankees starting from 1986 and only started watching the Knicks during the 1989-90 season because the summer of 1989 was when we finally got cable in the house and I started watching MSG religiously (mainly due to the Yankees and the monthly WWF shows but watching that programming is what got me into the Knicks because of all the commercials I would see about them).

    Also that poster, I recognize Mark Jackson, Johnny Newman, Trent Tucker and I assume one of the other 2 is Gerald Wilkins but who the hell is the 5th guy?? Rod Strickland?? Another regret is not being able to watch the Knicks under Pitino cause by that time I was old enough to have been able to watch them and remember some stuff but again stupid cable not being available in our block until summer of 1989 delayed by Knicks obsession by a couple of years.

  4. yellowboy90

    what writer wrote why fans should not expect to see a new Melo based on his Olympic play? Was that O’Connor too?

  5. nicos

    While I hate to always defend Felton but it’s hard to really blame him for the Lakers coming back- he was 2-9 after Melo went out but three of those misses were with less than 4 seconds left on the shot clock on plays where he really had to shoot- after Melo went out the Knicks offense was pretty much either pnr with Felton/Chandler or a step back jumper by JR. And not that it matters much but one of the misses on those last tip outs by Chandler was Kidd’s and one Felton’s not both by Felton as you said. I’d say JR’s defense on Artest or Novak’s lack of defense on whoever he was matched up against had as much to do with making the game close as Felton’s misses.

  6. jon abbey

    people really need to understand Felton’s job on this team better and stop giving him so much shit for missed shots, especially with Melo out for most of the second half and NY running as much of a ‘four corners’ as you can with a 24 second clock for a good chunk of that.

    with Melo out, Felton too often gets put in a position where no one is trying to do anything on offense except him, Chandler is still not very good at making himself a target (one reason he is a much less ‘efficient’ offensive player in reality than his TS% says), Brewer and Kidd and Novak are incapable of getting themselves clean looks at this point, so with Melo out, if the other team focuses on Smith and stays at home on the other guys, Felton is left to hoist up whatever shot he can for the good of the team. for as awesome as Kidd has been so far, he has a grand total of 9 made two point FGs all season (!!!!), which isn’t far from Novak’s equally grand total of 10.

  7. Matt Smith

    1) I partially agree with Jon, the exception being that Chandler dives much better than you give him credit for. But I thought the Lakers’ second half D strategy was pretty clear: Ray scores or no one scores. They let him take any mid-range jumpers he wanted. They switched on Tyson (who apparently lacks the post game to even take a point guard), leaving Ray to drive on Dwight. Sure, he could’ve passed the ball more. But methinks that would just leave you all angry with someone else for putting up a contested shot in the waning seconds of the shot clock.
    2) JRs grade is way, way too high. His defense was just terrible. He was a complete matador on Kobe. When they switched him to Artest, The Lakers RAN THEIR OFFENSE through MWP isos – when have you EVER seen that before? In the rare event that the Lakers didn’t look completely abysmal on O (ie: they passed more than 0 times), JR looked lost on help D.
    Now, onto his offense: his shot selection is terrible. The step-back fadeaway jumper is NOT a reliable take, and its his go-to move. You shouldn’t reward him with praise just because he happened to make a decent % of them, because he’s going to turn in just as many games where he clanks 90% of them. There’s a time and place for those shots, namely at the end of the shot clock when he’s our best option (read: Melo is on the bench), but he’s doing it mainly at the wrong times.
    One of the reasons I was so happy with him early in the season is because it seemed like he fixed both of these problems, but apparently old habits die hard.
    3) I think you’re too hard on Prigs (in general, not just this game). He’s a past-first PG that makes smart, safe plays. He might not run the p&r like you’d want to, but I’d bet he leads the team in Gretzky assists. Plus, how many times have you seen him come out of nowhere to grab an O-board or swipe away the ball from a careless defender receiving an inbounds pass?

  8. Frank O.

    Resilience.
    Your best player is down. Facing Kobe (where’s the beef).
    Big Dwight, who is looking more and more the slacker.
    And the Knicks win. Again.
    This is a tough plan.

  9. flossy

    Said it before, and I’ll say it again: 38 minutes is way too many for Jason Kidd. It would really be nice if Felton didn’t need another PG out there to hold his hand for, let’s see… almost the entire game.

  10. jon abbey

    flossy:
    Said it before, and I’ll say it again: 38 minutes is way too many for Jason Kidd.It would really be nice if Felton didn’t need another PG out there to hold his hand for, let’s see… almost the entire game.

    I don’t think it’s exactly that as much as with Melo, Amar’e, Shumpert and Camby out, it’s hard not to play Kidd so much as there aren’t a lot of other options. Shumpert coming back should really help this situation as it will allow Kidd to get back to the 20-25 minute range coming off the bench.

  11. jon abbey

    that being said, it’d be nice to see Copeland and/or White get some quality minutes against CLE if Melo sits out (as he probably should).

  12. ephus

    First, let’s celebrate this win. With Melo on the floor, the Lakers were not able to stay in the same universe as the Knicks.

    Second, ‘Melo is a beast right now. He is an impossible cover. Please be healthy.

    Third, Ray Felton was being challenged by the Lakers to carry the offense in the second half. Part of the problem was that the Knicks were not initiating their offense until the shot clock got to :12, because they were trying to slow the game down. When the chips were down late, Felton got two great assists by lobbing to Chandler and finding JR Smith for the open 3. He is a strong finisher, and needs to take the ball all the way to the hoop more often – not settle for the 14′ jumper.

    Fourth, Knicks clearly have roles for Shumpert and Amar’e. STAT can PnR when Chandler is off the floor. It will work really well with Rasheed stretching the defense. Shumpert can provide strong on the ball defense against players like Kobe – which was needed last night.

  13. Juany8

    jon abbey:
    people really need to understand Felton’s job on this team better and stop giving him so much shit for missed shots, especially with Melo out for most of the second half and NY running as much of a ‘four corners’ as you can with a 24 second clock for a good chunk of that.

    with Melo out, Felton too often gets put in a position where no one is trying to do anything on offense except him, Chandler is still not very good at making himself a target (one reason he is a much less ‘efficient’ offensive player in reality than his TS% says), Brewer and Kidd and Novak are incapable of getting themselves clean looks at this point, so with Melo out, if the other team focuses on Smith and stays at home on the other guys, Felton is left to hoist up whatever shot he can for the good of the team. for as awesome as Kidd has been so far, he has a grand total of 9 made two point FGs all season (!!!!), which isn’t far from Novak’s equally grand total of 10.

    Although I generally agree with this line of thinking, the ratio of bad shots to necessary shots is skewing a little high these past few games. Even in the first half, Felton just went out and took some quick shots before Chandler had even had a real chance to roll to the basket, with plenty of time on the clock and Melo shooting fireballs out of his ass. He is essential to the running of this team, but let’s not act like he’s anything more than a solid starter who fits this team’s needs particularly well.

    As far as Melo, I will go ahead and say that he is the most devastating half court player in the NBA this season. I bet anything that if he could get the number of break away dunks Lebron and Durant get, he’d be very nearly as efficient as them, since those are the easiest shots in basketball. This team plays slow anyways, so it’s not a big loss

  14. Juany8

    ephus:
    First, let’s celebrate this win.With Melo on the floor, the Lakers were not able to stay in the same universe as the Knicks.

    Second, ‘Melo is a beast right now.He is an impossible cover.Please be healthy.

    Third, Ray Felton was being challenged by the Lakers to carry the offense in the second half.Part of the problem was that the Knicks were not initiating their offense until the shot clock got to :12, because they were trying to slow the game down.When the chips were down late, Felton got two great assists by lobbing to Chandler and finding JR Smith for the open 3.He is a strong finisher, and needs to take the ball all the way to the hoop more often – not settle for the 14? jumper.

    Fourth, Knicks clearly have roles for Shumpert and Amar’e.STAT can PnR when Chandler is off the floor.It will work really well with Rasheed stretching the defense.Shumpert can provide strong on the ball defense against players like Kobe – which was needed last night.

    I still have faith in Camby giving the Knicks some solid minutes this season too, Rasheed can’t be relied upon every single time Chandler has a problem. This team is going to have little injuries all season, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see someone go down, as long as Chandler, Kidd, Melo, and Felton are healthy going into the playoffs though, this team has a chance against anyone.

  15. ephus

    Juany8:This team is going to have little injuries all season, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see someone go down, as long as Chandler, Kidd, Melo, and Felton are healthy going into the playoffs though, this team has a chance against anyone.

    One of these things is not like the others. I hope Kidd is healthy for the playoffs, but it is hard to rely on a 39 yo to play 30+ minutes per game.

  16. JK47

    Melo now up to a .592 TS% and has cracked the .200 WS/48 barrier, sitting at .209.

    He has the highest USG% of his career, yet also the highest TS% and the lowest TOV% of his career. The man has played some really great basketball. Let’s hope he’s okay.

  17. d-mar

    Howard looks like a shell of himself. I don’t know if it’s because he doesn’t give a crap, or that his back is still an issue, but you hardly even noticed him when he was on the court last night. The Knicks were taking it to the basket with impunity, and he had 1 block in 38 minutes. And what’s up with him launching bank shots from 15 feet?

  18. Hubert Davis

    If we’re going to go Dickens for this review (which was great by the way), Ray Felton’s woeful shooting is beginning to loom like the Ghost of a Starksian Game 7 Future. Every time I watch one of these games I imagine it taking place in Oklahoma City with the championship on the line.

  19. eddiehallman

    I have to disagree with the article, and agree with a couple of the other posters about Felton’s shooting. I didn’t see him taking many contested jumpers and out of control layups; I saw the Lakers daring him to take wide open 14 footers over and over again, and he just kept missing. If you’re an NBA guard you have to take the open 14 footer; it’s a great look. Of course, you should probably hit it 80% of the time and Felton probably missed about 80% of them last night. That shot is where he gets a lot of his points from, so I won’t be upset about it. It was frustrating to watch, but they were giving him easy looks, he had to take them. He’s just gotta get that shot together, and unfortunately looks like he’ll continue to be the same streaky Ray. Hot for a week or two, ice cold for a week or two.

  20. JK47

    Ray Felton is 4-21 for the season on FGA from 10-15 feet. That’s a .190 shooting percentage. For the entire season. So the 14-footer is not part of his game at all. He’s also shooting an alarmingly bad .320 on shots from 3 to 9 feet. So on shots from 3 to 15 feet he is 20-71 for a .282 FG%.

    His 3-point percentage is progressing rapidly to the mean as well; he’s shooting .326 from 3PT over his last ten games and that includes the 6-10 performance in the Miami game.

    I hope he can figure something out, because this has been the most inept season of his career in terms of shooting the ball, and that’s saying a lot. Probably my least favorite Ray Felton stat is that he’s averaging 16 FGA per game for a team that plays at the 24th fastest pace in the league. You have to love the way he’s protecting the ball and running the offense, but a .473 TS% on 26.9 USG% is extremely wack.

  21. flossy

    JK47:
    Ray Felton is 4-21 for the season on FGA from 10-15 feet.That’s a .190 shooting percentage.For the entire season.So the 14-footer is not part of his game at all.He’s also shooting an alarmingly bad .320 on shots from 3 to 9 feet.So on shots from 3 to 15 feet he is 20-71 for a .282 FG%.

    His 3-point percentage is progressing rapidly to the mean as well; he’s shooting .326 from 3PT over his last ten games and that includes the 6-10 performance in the Miami game.

    I hope he can figure something out, because this has been the most inept season of his career in terms of shooting the ball, and that’s saying a lot.Probably my least favorite Ray Felton stat is that he’s averaging 16 FGA per game for a team that plays at the 24th fastest pace in the league.You have to love the way he’s protecting the ball and running the offense, but a .473 TS% on 26.9 USG% is extremely wack.

    Yup. News flash, folks, Raymond Felton sucks at shooting. Always has and probably always will. He is in no way, shape or form an acceptable second option on offense for a team that wants to contend for a title. Our offense does depend on him taking a certain volume of shots, but not as many as he is taking. I think we’ll know whether this is a passing phase or a permanent condition if he continues to take more FGA/36 than Amar’e once STAT is back in the rotation.

  22. flossy

    jon abbey:
    well, Felton is in nine of the top 10 5 man units for NY so far this year, and has the third best on court/off court net on the team (behind Melo and Chandler, just ahead of Kidd):

    http://www.82games.com/1213/1213NYK2.HTM

    http://www.82games.com/1213/1213NYK.HTM

    Well, his passing and ball control have been excellent this year. And Tyson Chandler has bailed him out about a hundred times already. Still, .473 TS% is pathetic for someone who has been unsustainably hot for 3, and kind of horrifying considering he takes 16 (!!!) shots per game. How can someone average 16 FGA attempts and less than 2 FTA per night in good conscience?

  23. Static

    The problem with teams daring Felton to beat them off the bounce, or hit a mid range J, is that it allows everyone to stay home on the Knicks actual set or J shooters, since he’s proving again that while he’s not shy about shooting, he usually can’t make them. Also, I’m not sure Felton really has the court vision to find people if they really are open, other than Tyson. I agree with people who say he has to shoot some anyway, but this is just to much.

  24. JC Knickfan

    Yeah I’ve been negative on Felton also, but since the Knicks are still winning I’m stop complaining about it. I’m also presuming Stat will become the 2nd option when he comes back. So right now I’m more of a wait and see before ranting about Ray-Ray’s FGA.

    I also wanted to know who was 2nd option on Dallas championship team. Jason Terry was 2nd leading scorer with TS 0.604 and 17.5 ppg. Dirk of course was top dog with a 0.609 TS and 27.7ppg. So no surprises that your top 2 scorers had elite numbers during playoffs.

    At the end day, when and if Knicks play Miami hopefully in the ECF, we need both Melo and Stat to shoot elite numbers. Otherwise, if your telling it’s Felton, I wouldn’t give Knicks more then 5% chance to win the series.

  25. nicos

    flossy:
    Said it before, and I’ll say it again: 38 minutes is way too many for Jason Kidd.It would really be nice if Felton didn’t need another PG out there to hold his hand for, let’s see… almost the entire game.

    Oh please, Felton has helped Kidd enormously by moving him off of the ball and keeping him having to guard quicker ones. Kidd hasn’t had a turnover rate below 20% in seven years and now he’s averaging a career low. His job (which he’s been amazing at) is to stand at the three point line and make passes/shots against rotations caused by either Melo or Felton’s penetration. And when this doesn’t happen you get games like Chicago- Kidd was 2-7 with two assists and three turnovers. There’s no way in hell Kidd could do what Felton is doing in terms of constant motion/running multiple pnrs anymore- his legs would fall off in a week.

  26. maxwell_3g

    ephus:
    First, let’s celebrate this win.With Melo on the floor, the Lakers were not able to stay in the same universe as the Knicks.

    Second, ‘Melo is a beast right now.He is an impossible cover.Please be healthy.

    Third, Ray Felton was being challenged by the Lakers to carry the offense in the second half.Part of the problem was that the Knicks were not initiating their offense until the shot clock got to :12, because they were trying to slow the game down.When the chips were down late, Felton got two great assists by lobbing to Chandler and finding JR Smith for the open 3.He is a strong finisher, and needs to take the ball all the way to the hoop more often – not settle for the 14? jumper.

    Fourth, Knicks clearly have roles for Shumpert and Amar’e.STAT can PnR when Chandler is off the floor.It will work really well with Rasheed stretching the defense.Shumpert can provide strong on the ball defense against players like Kobe – which was needed last night.

    stat’ biggest oddensive contribution…. running the p and r with prigs at the top of the key will eliminate the 4-6 pick and pops a game that leads to sheed 3’s from the top of the key. i will say, dspite their low pct, i will miss thise sheeds hoists. they are entertaining

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