Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

ESPN: Sources: Knicks fear Wallace done for season

Just the sort of thing you want to hear.

According to ESPN:

As the uncertainty surrounding Rasheed Wallace’s left foot injury lingers, members of the New York Knicks organization fear Wallace will be out for an extended period, possibly for the entire season, two league sources told ESPNNewYork.com.

Wallace has been out since Dec. 15 with a stress reaction in his left foot.

Knicks coach Mike Woodson said last week that he hoped Wallace would begin running this week, but he told reporters in London on Wednesday that Wallace, 38, has yet to do so.

“He’ll be back — but when, I don’t know,” Woodson said. “We’re gradually trying to get him back where he can run again so he can get back in a uniform. But when, we don’t know when yet.”

The uncertainty surrounding Wallace’s injury explains the Knicks’ interest in Kenyon Martin. It sounds like they’ll only sign Martin if they learn that Wallace will definitely be out for an extended period of time (how long is too long is an interesting question).

It is pretty funny that we find ourselves upset that Rasheed Wallace is taking a long time coming back from an injury. How things have changed from the preseason!

19 comments on “ESPN: Sources: Knicks fear Wallace done for season

  1. JK47

    I actually think Kenyon Martin is a better fit for the team. The team needs a banger they can count on to get out and play physical. All of the Knicks’ other power forward types are old and/or brittle. K-Mart may be past his prime but unless he’s fallen off a cliff he still brings some nastiness and defensive presence to the party.

  2. Thomas B.

    Sure let’s bring in Kenyon Martin. Mr. Micro-fracture will fit right in with our team. Between Stoudemire, Anthony, Shumpert, and Martin, we can start calling every Knick game the Battle at Wounded Knee.

    Thank you. Thank you. I’ll be here all week. Tip your waitress, and try the veal! Good night!!

  3. ruruland

    Shooting coach Dave Hopla has been working with Shumpert on jumping less to focus more on his release point and consistency. Tim Hardaway remembers returning from his ACL injury, suffered in 1993, and being a much better shooter. He told ESPNNewYork.com last year the same thing would happen with Shumpert and Derrick Rose.

    “His jumpshot is going to come back a lot better than what it was, I’ll you that,” he said. “His jumpers and his free throw percentage are going to be up. I’m telling you. That’s all you can do. You can’t do anything else, but shoot around and just shoot free throws.”

  4. Robtachi

    Oh gee whiz perhaps we can store this in the ol’ memory bankitoriums as one of the inherent risks of an offseason strategy revolving around letting 23-year-old high upside players walk for nothing and signing multiple geriatrics to fill out the roster instead.

  5. Donnie Walsh

    ruruland:
    Tim Hardaway remembers returning from his ACL injury, suffered in 1993, and being a much better shooter…

    Interesting that his FG% went down post-surgery and stayed down for the rest of his career. And his FT shooting went down too. And his eFG% trended downward too. (next he’s going to claim to remember the Heat beating the Knicks in the 1999 playoffs?)

  6. ruruland

    Donnie Walsh: Interesting that his FG% went down post-surgery and stayed down for the rest of his career. And his FT shooting went down too. And his eFG% trended downward too. (next he’s going to claim to remember the Heat beating the Knicks in the 1999 playoffs?)

    Huh?

    3-pt percentage prior to knee surgery: 34%

    3-pt percentage post-knee surgery: 36%

  7. yellowboy90

    Corey Brewer said the same thing too. I don’t know the stats but all he did was shoot and now he is pretty good.

  8. Brian Cronin

    Hardaway’s three point shooting went up, as did his free throw shooting, but his TS% and his EFG% went down (and his traditional FG% went down a lot, but that’s not a big deal as he obviously became more of a three-point shooter). Honestly, though, all of the changes were pretty negligible either way. So yeah, Hardaway is misremembering how things went, unless he was specifically referring to his three-point shooting and his free throw shooting, which I do not believe he was (and again, even there, the changes were nothing to write home about – a lot of it was the sort of improvement you expect to see from players anyways).

  9. BigBlueAL

    Favorite Tim Hardaway quote was after Game 7 in 2000 when he was blaming the loss on the refs and said “thats why they call him Knick Bavetta” referring to Dick Bavetta lol.

  10. The Honorable Cock Jowles

    ruruland: Huh?

    3-pt percentage prior to knee surgery: 34%

    3-pt percentage post-knee surgery: 36%

    WHOA

    QED, EVERYONE. Q-E-D.

  11. Nick C.

    ruruland: Huh?3-pt percentage prior to knee surgery: 34% 3-pt percentage post-knee surgery: 36%

    I would have thought “much better” would have been much better. That is like a bit better and maybe not much better than one would (optomistically) expect with experience and over time. Is 36% even good much less league average?

  12. Douglas

    Nick C.: I would have thought “much better” would have been much better. That is like a bit better and maybe not much better than one would (optomistically) expect with experience and over time. Is 36% even good much less league average?

    Maybe he… felt better about his stroke? Weird.

  13. Brian Cronin

    Maybe he… felt better about his stroke? Weird.

    I think that’s basically it, actually. Players very frequently will go by how they felt when they look back on their careers, whether their feelings are accurate or not. Like you’ll see a guy say something like, “I felt much looser when Coach/Manager A showed up, and it made me a better player” and then you look and see that they did better before Coach/Manager A showed up.

  14. The Honorable Cock Jowles

    Brian Cronin: I think that’s basically it, actually. Players very frequently will go by how they felt when they look back on their careers, whether their feelings are accurate or not. Like you’ll see a guy say something like, “I felt much looser when Coach/Manager A showed up, and it made me a better player” and then you look and see that they did better before Coach/Manager A showed up.

    But according to some of our posters, “did better” is something we can’t confirm. A guy’s TS% could drop ten points and someone would make an argument that his jumper actually improved.

  15. Robtachi

    The Honorable Cock Jowles: But according to some of our posters, “did better” is something we can’t confirm. A guy’s TS% could drop ten points and someone would make an argument that his jumper actually improved.

    Is there anyone on this blog who honestly doesn’t trust the value of TS% by this point?

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