Statistical Analysis. Humor. Knicks.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

2012 Report Card: Jerome Jordan

Stats:

Player Age G MP MPG PER TS% eFG% TRB% AST% TOV% USG%
Jerome Jordan 25 21 108 5.1 18.3 0.561 0.515 14.4 6.3 5.1 16.4

Per 36 Minutes:

FGA 3PA 3P% FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
11 0 0 3.3 0.8 4.7 4.3 9 1.3 0.3 2 0.7 5 14

Sometimes storm clouds sit visibly on the horizon. Other times the sun lights up a cloudless sky on a perfect spring day. But mostly, days are just days. Partly sunny and partly cloudy blend; neither glorious nor awful. Such days rarely merit entry into conversation. What’s the point? In truth, if we ever reminisce about such days it is usually to mark the time before the interesting weather arrived.

Jerome Jordan’s rookie season was like 21 days of utterly unremarkable weather. Should we ever find ourselves reminiscing about it at some future date, (barring the tragic) we will almost certainly be puzzling over the rather unassuming start to his career. To be fair, Jordan resembles (if one squints) a useful backup big. Similar to Boston’s Ryan Hollins, if not as athletic. Jordan is quality depth. But given the team’s affinity for Josh Harrelson, Jordan may be near-superfluous depth. Jordan saw very limited action this year despite significant injuries in the frontcourt. When asked about the prospect of playing Jordan in March, with Jeffries and Stoudemire still out, Coach Woodson did not exactly give a ringing endorsement.

‘Would I be scared to throw him in there if we got in foul trouble and needed to use him?’ Woodson said earlier in the week. ‘Absolutely not. I think he can give us some positive minutes, but not big minutes. He just hasn’t played enough.’

I like Jordan, but him seeing significant time in NY would likely follow a pretty significant roster shakeup.

Grades (5 point scale):
Offense:3.5 – He generally only shoots layups and dunks, but he has a little game.
Defense:INC – This was hard to assess in the few glimpses I saw.
Teamwork:INC
Rootability:4 – I have seen two games live at Duke’s Cameron Indoor Arena (vs. Boston College and Tulsa), so I like Jordan and Jared Dudley for no other reason.
Performance/Expectations:0 – NBA 12th men, going back to the giants like Jack Haley, Scott Hastings, and Paul Shirley have a legacy to uphold. We expect them to be interesting. We expect them to be in the twitterverse, in the blogosphere, or at least an interesting quote. Something. Jerome Jordan has not and is not. He goes to practice and just collects a paycheck, as if that’s all there is to being a 12th man. No movie reviews. No restaurant reviews. No Jamaican jerk recipes. No bible verses. No Nothing. And dammit, I’m not here to just hand out passing grades like candy.
Final Grade:0 – Be more interesting.

22 comments on “2012 Report Card: Jerome Jordan

  1. The Honorable Cock Jowles

    He should be the first big man off the bench. His college numbers were great, and his numbers in 108 minutes are also great. Give him burn until he shows that he’s not NBA quality. Or wait until he’s going to be a UFA before getting some production out of him, and having to outbid other teams to keep him. (That’s probably what will happen.)

    When a player projects well and then plays well, let him play! I don’t see the harm in putting him in when Chandler’s off the floor.

  2. David Crockett

    I actually don’t entirely disagree, but the Knicks currently have a bit of a logjam at the 4 and 5 assuming Novak and Jeffries are back. They also like Harrelson’s ability to space the floor.

    I think for Jordan to see the floor there some thinning out in the frontcourt must happen. That’s not out of the question. Both Jeffries and Novak could leave. Either way, Jordan’s quickest route to playing time is probably on defense.

  3. Frank

    He’ll get a chance to show something in summer league. I remember watching him 2 summers ago thinking he didn’t even seem polished enough to be playing in summer league not to mention actual games.

    Meanwhile, should I take it as a good thing, bad thing, or nothing that we haven’t heard anything about this bird rights arbitration?

  4. KnickfaninNJ

    I think the delay in the arbitrator’s decision means nothing. He has a two week time frame to decide and probably needs to provide a written decision that explains his reasoning. I can’t imagine this taking less than a week and wouldn’t be surprised if it took a full two weeks.

  5. nicos

    I think Jordan struggled to get minutes in part because there’s nothing in his game that really jumps out at you- he’s a solid rebounder but not great, he’ll block a shot or two but he’s not a defensive specialist, he’s got a decent touch out to 15 but not really a floor spreader, etc… That doesn’t mean he’s not effective just that I think coaches like guys off the bench who fit a specific role- rebounder, defender, floor spreader- bench guys are called role players for a reason and he hasn’t found his niche yet. You have to think that the Knick’s summer league coaches are going to spend 99% of their time with three guys- Jordan, Harrellson, and whoever the second round pick so he’s going to have a great opportunity to get everyone’s attention.

  6. johnlocke

    totally agree …

    nicos:
    I think Jordan struggled to get minutes in part because there’s nothing in his game that really jumps out at you- he’s a solid rebounder but not great, he’ll block a shot or two but he’s not a defensive specialist, he’s got a decent touch out to 15 but not really a floor spreader, etc…That doesn’t mean he’s not effective just that I think coaches like guys off the bench who fit a specific role- rebounder, defender, floor spreader- bench guys are called role players for a reason and he hasn’t found his niche yet. You have to think that the Knick’s summer league coaches are going to spend 99% of their time with three guys- Jordan, Harrellson, and whoever the second round pick so he’s going to have a great opportunity to get everyone’s attention.

  7. The Honorable Cock Jowles

    nicos:
    I think Jordan struggled to get minutes in part because there’s nothing in his game that really jumps out at you- he’s a solid rebounder but not great, he’ll block a shot or two but he’s not a defensive specialist, he’s got a decent touch out to 15 but not really a floor spreader, etc…That doesn’t mean he’s not effective just that I think coaches like guys off the bench who fit a specific role- rebounder, defender, floor spreader- bench guys are called role players for a reason and he hasn’t found his niche yet. You have to think that the Knick’s summer league coaches are going to spend 99% of their time with three guys- Jordan, Harrellson, and whoever the second round pick so he’s going to have a great opportunity to get everyone’s attention.

    This is a pretty silly thing to say about a guy who played 108 minutes. Nothing jumps out? How could it? But the reality is that he put up great numbers. 2 turnovers in 108 minutes. .561 TS% (good for a rookie). And he’s 25 years old. If he can’t play now, he’s never going to play.

  8. nicos

    The Honorable Cock Jowles: This is a pretty silly thing to say about a guy who played 108 minutes. Nothing jumps out? How could it? But the reality is that he put up great numbers. 2 turnovers in 108 minutes. .561 TS% (good for a rookie). And he’s 25 years old. If he can’t play now, he’s never going to play.

    Really?? You couldn’t see that Faried’s athleticism and motor was going to carry over to the pros in just the first few games he got minutes? For the record, you could and mentioned it here so I’m not sure the idea that nothing about a player could possible jump out in limited minutes holds water. Lin had logged less than 90 minutes of game time for the Knicks before he was put in the starting lineup. D’A certainly saw that Harrellson fit a needed role- a big who could potentially stretch the floor- long before he had played 108 minutes- they saw the way he shot the ball in practice and that, coupled with better than expected defensive play got him into the rotation while Jordan sat on bench.
    I agree that he should play- my point was more that coaches can be somewhat myopic, especially with young guys, and sometimes a guy with a more easily definable role might get minutes over a better, more rounded player, just because a coach knows exactly how he’s going to use him.

  9. Brian Cronin

    Heh, I recently noted that George Karl assistants had not had good luck with head coaching jobs and now former Karl assistant Mike Dunlap just got hired to be the Charlotte Bobcats coach. Wow, what a slap in the face to Quin Snyder and Brian Shaw, right? You narrow the search down to them and Jerry Sloan. Sloan backs out. You bring Shaw and Snyder in for interviews and then you decide to widen the interview pool and then quickly hire Dunlap? Ouch. Is Shaw ever going to get a head coaching gig?

    Meanwhile, we talked about Tim Grgurich recently and it sounds like he’ll join Dunlap in Charlotte as his top assistant. Sounds like a great idea, pairing a veteran with a first-time NBA head coach (not that Dunlap is new to coaching, as he is clearly not, having coached for 30 years).

    ” Mike Dunlap absolutely elevates every player and team he comes into contact with.” High praise from George Karl about Dunlap. Good luck, Mike!

  10. ruruland

    I’m actually with THCJ on this, not because of the extremely small and useless statistical sample, but because the visual evidence that is obvious to anyone with a trained eye.

    And Nicos, I agree with your last graf, think the circumstances present with Woodson made it very difficult to give him long burn. He was not an MDA player by any stretch of the imagination.

    Considering that Jordan’s only played basketball for a few years, his skill development is pretty amazing. His length and fluidity stand out just as much as his footwork and coordination. He’s shown moves and countermoves with both hands, and he knows how to use deception with his upper body, very good ball fakes,too. The midrange jump shot looks great.

    This is a kid who, had he started playing basketball at an earlier age, would have gone to a much better school and would have likely been a lottery pick.

    Some question his motor, but really it was his lack of demonstrable skills over a long period that made him a second rounder from what I’ve read.

    I think he’s another Lin who could complement Chandler quite well (given that Chandler has the lateral agility to guard 4s)……

    At the very least I think he turns into a good post-player who provides rim protection. Even if he is poor in the pnr and struggles staying in front of his man without fouling, it’s very hard for guys with his wingspan to be net negatives on defense.

    I think even with his lowest defensive projection, he’d be an upgrade on defense — better rebounder and shot contester.

    Offensively, maybe he’s no, say, Eddy Curry inside, but he reminds some of Roy Hibbert (more fluid, Hibbert has stronger base but weak upper body)….. The main difference is that Jordan has a wingspan 4 inches longer!! Only McGee has a longer wingspan (.5 inches longer, better athlete but much less polished). Bynum has a wingspan an inch shorter.

    If this board can get excited about Mosgov, it should be drooling…

  11. ruruland

    Brian Cronin:
    Heh, I recently noted that George Karl assistants had not had good luck with head coaching jobs and now former Karl assistant Mike Dunlap just got hired to be the Charlotte Bobcats coach. Wow, what a slap in the face to Quin Snyder and Brian Shaw, right? You narrow the search down to them and Jerry Sloan. Sloan backs out. You bring Shaw and Snyder in for interviews and then you decide to widen the interview pool and then quickly hire Dunlap? Ouch. Is Shaw ever going to get a head coaching gig?

    Meanwhile, we talked about Tim Grgurich recently and it sounds like he’ll join Dunlap in Charlotte as his top assistant. Sounds like a great idea, pairing a veteran with a first-time NBA head coach (not that Dunlap is new to coaching, as he is clearly not, having coached for 30 years).

    ” Mike Dunlap absolutely elevates every player and team he comes into contact with.” High praise from George Karl about Dunlap. Good luck, Mike!

    Mike Dunlap is a good player development coach but he’s soft spoken and will have a hard time connecting and leading a team.

    Grg is the best in the business, so they will definitely be improved next year (yeah, it would be hard not to be).

    Grg is definitely picky about who he coaches for and he’s never wanted to be a head coach.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if it was Grg that landed Dunlap the job. I don’t think Dunlap gets hired over those two without him. It’s probably why they moved so fast.

  12. ruruland

    Also, a lot of the same questions about Bynum are true of Jordan. Sort of enigmatic, inconsistent motor.

    I say who cares. Maybe Jordan isn’t as strong as Bynum, but he’s got a better jumper.

    I think the elite length paired with back to basket skill and touch is the rarest commodity in the NBA.

  13. nicos

    ruruland:

    I think the elite length paired with back to basket skill and touch is the rarest commodity in the NBA.

    Agree, but in order to take advantage of back to the basket skill you need a certain amount of commitment from the coaching staff. They have to willing to run plays for him- are they going to do that once he starts getting minutes when Stat or Melo are also on the floor? What’s encouraging is that he looks like he could be pretty effective in the high post as well- I think it’ll be easier for him to get burn as a pick and pop center who can flash into the post (Marc Gasol without the passing) than as a traditional low-post guy (a la Hibbert) which would require a real vote of confidence from the coaching staff.

  14. Brian Cronin

    Mike Dunlap is a good player development coach but he’s soft spoken and will have a hard time connecting and leading a team.

    Grg is the best in the business, so they will definitely be improved next year (yeah, it would be hard not to be).

    Grg is definitely picky about who he coaches for and he’s never wanted to be a head coach.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if it was Grg that landed Dunlap the job. I don’t think Dunlap gets hired over those two without him. It’s probably why they moved so fast.

    If so, that’s quite a vote of confidence in Dunlap from Grg, right?

  15. slovene knick

    Adolphus was in my “hood” for two consecutive years playing in adriatic, european and national leagues. I tracked him knowing he’s actually a Knick…
    First he was in Serbia where he was just rebounding and stuffing(silly efficient) with no offensive play’s designed for him.
    Then during lockout he was in Slovenia and he was the best(or one of two)player on a solid well rounded team. You could see he made some serious progress.
    He’ s a sleeper and can be better for Knicks than Mozgov ever could.
    I was very disappointed not to see him get any playing time this year.

    In the finals against Lakers I would play him alongside Chandler anytime:))

  16. ruruland

    Brian Cronin: If so, that’s quite a vote of confidence in Dunlap from Grg, right?

    Yes, I can only deduce as you have. I don’t know what their relationship was like.

    OT: For all of the drivel that’s been written lately regarding team construction etc, going to start posting the videos of the Woodson Knicks with full starting five.

    I think the no point guard teams have warped people’s memories of how good the offense looked during this stretch.

    Tonight I’m linking the highlights of the Portland game.

    I think sometimes people forget that both Amar’e and Melo originally came from extreme-running teams. I argue all the time about the merits of teams that rely on running and transition, but I think with the right kind of point guard and wings it’s a threat that can be replicated some in the postseason.

    I think it creates ball movement energy, too. And you’ll notice that in the highlights. You’ll see a high number of Melo/Amar’e baskets coming off layered action and multiple passes.

    This idea that Woodson only knows how to create isolation plays is beyond stupid.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sg2lOGrz6FQ&feature=related

  17. ruruland

    Ok I lied. Look at the last game with MDA. Notice what happens when Melo gets penetration and he finds Lin replacing space at the 3pt line at 3:45

    A driving lane is created by making the defense move… Those are cracks Davis, Bibby and Douglas could not take advantage of that Lin can consistently exploit.

    In this instance he takes a pull up floater. There is no better offense than having a point guard who can finish get in the lane. And as defenses start to respect Lin’s scoring, it will only create open shots for teammates.

    I think Woodson is going to keep aspect of MDA’s pick and roll offense in-tact. it’s not like he hasn’t said so himself on more than one occasion.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii4uQZxNVDI&feature=fvwrel

  18. Frank

    Someone mentioned it above but I think Ryan Hollins is a good comp for Jordan. I think his ceiling is probably competent backup C who is able to fill in in case of emergency without embarrassing himself. He’s clearly very athletic, has a 7’6″ wingspan and 9’5″ standing reach. By comparison, he would have been the 2nd tallest, 2nd longest wingspan, and highest standing reach if he had been at the combine this year. For some reason there is no athletic testing on him, but clearly he has the body to play in this league. He looks probably average athletically, but there is no doubt he can be a major force protecting the basket if he can get his feet right.

  19. slovene knick

    A guy of his frame is a rarity…this alone needs some serious consideration. Try him out in NBA games…give him time. Twenty minutes a game for seven games or so – tell him it’s his chance. Has he got or has he not?

    He’s from Jamaica the island where Knick C’s grow…I say he’s got it.

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