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Friday, October 31, 2014

2012 Game Preview – Suns @ Knicks

Suns Knicks

Phoenix Suns (4-9, 1-5 away) @ New York Knicks (6-7, 3-3 home)

Tonight, two teams in the midst of a losing streak will do battle at Madison Square Garden. The Knicks will try to prevent their streak from reaching four, while the Suns look to halt their skid at six. This will be the only meeting between the two teams this season, due to the loss of games. Phoenix and New York split the two meetings last year, with each team winning on the other’s home court.

Fundamentals
When – January 18th, 2012
Time – 7:30 PM
Where – Madison Square Garden
TV – MSG

Injury Report – New York
Baron Davis (Out) – Back

Injury Report – Phoenix
None

Offensive Rating – New York 100.1 (23rd) Phoenix – 103.3 (13th)
Defensive Rating – New York 101.5 (12th) Phoenix – 106.6 (26th)
Pace – New York – 93.8 (3rd) Phoenix – 91.1 (18th)
High PER Performer – New York – Carmelo Anthony (25.1) Phoenix – Marcin Gortat (23.8)

Probable Starters – New York
PG – Iman Shumpert
SG – Landry Fields
SF – Carmelo Anthony
PF – Amar’e Stoudemire
C – Tyson Chandler

Probable Starters – Phoenix
PG – Steve Nash
SG – Jared Dudley
SF – Grant Hill
PF – Channing Frye
C – Marcin Gortat

Keep an Eye On

1. The Creative Canadian – Steve Nash just keeps getting it done, and is averaging a double double for the season so far. Nash is the absolute master of the pick and roll, whether he makes a pinpoint pass to the roll man, finds an open teammate, or knocks down a jumper. The Suns average 0.99 PPP (Points Per Possession) when Nash is the ball handler in the pick and roll, according to mySynergySports. Phoenix still relies heavily on Nash’s 37-year-old legs to do the majority of playmaking. His assist percentage is an astouding 58.1%. the Knicks highest player in that category? Carmelo Anthony, at 28.3%.

2. Zone D – I have tuned in briefly to a few of Phoenix’s games, and they will move to a zone defense during particular stretches. I’m sure I don’t need to remind a single soul about how the Knicks responded to Orlando’s zone defense late in Monday’s loss. Stan Van Gundy switched to the zone at the perfect time, and the Knicks will need to be prepared for the potential of Head Coach Alvin Gentry showing the same look.

3. ‘Melo Point Forward – Do what you will with this statistic, but Carmelo Anthony leads the league in PPP when he is the ball handler in the P&R (1.2). However, the Knicks are only utilizing him in that situation 15.5% of the time, compare that to the 31.6% in isolation scenarios.

4. ‘Melo Milestone – ‘Melo is within six points of reaching the 15,000 point plateau.

58 comments on “2012 Game Preview – Suns @ Knicks

  1. hoolahoop

    Every player on the knicks would be wise to carefully study Steve Nash’s methodology. A 37 yo white guy with limited physical skills is still one of the elite guards of the NBA.
    It’s not about scoring. It’s about the team scoring.

  2. Ben R

    I’ve got a question. Is our lack of ball movement due to our poor guard play or is our poor guard play due to our lack of ball movement? Is it just bad luck that Fields, Douglas and Walker all forgot how to shoot at once or is it more likely that our ball stopping offense has taken them out of their rhythm?

  3. Brian Cronin (@Brian_Cronin)

    While I am definitely an advocate of the “the system is what is making Fields so awful” theory in general, I don’t think the system change would explain away why all three men can’t hit the broad side of a barn with their shots right now.

  4. Die_Hard_Knick_Fan

    @Ben R – I think it’s definitely a lack of ball movement and more importantly – way too many three pointers. Anthony and Stat look like they don’t like playing with each other and Chandler looks like he’s still trying to fit as a role player. I think Chandler just wants to do his part but is having a hard time finding that role with Stat and Anthony on the court at the same time. It seems like Stat and Anthony get the ball and feel like if they pass it they won’t get it back. When you look at the Heat and James and Wade, they seem like they enjoy playing with each other and will give up their stats for the better of the team. The Knicks don’t seem to have found that playing ground yet.

  5. TDM

    Its crazy with a front court of Tyson, STAT and Melo that we are hoping (praying) for a W, especially when the match-up is against Gortat, Frye and Hill. It really goes to show (1) how bad our back court is; and (2) how dangerous Nash can be even when surrounded by mid-tier players.

  6. The Honorable Cock Jowles

    hoolahoop:
    Every player on the knicks would be wise to carefully study Steve Nash’s methodology. A 37 yo white guy with limited physical skills is still one of the elite guards of the NBA.
    It’s not about scoring. It’s about the team scoring.

    I never really understood how he had limited physical skills. He’s not Derrick Rose, but at 32, he shot .613 eFG.

    Age 32. Think about that. A 32-year-old 6’3″ guard made 45.5% of his 3PA. And he’s at 43% for his career.

    How can anyone shoot 90 FT% for his career without an abundance of body control?

  7. Richmond County

    There was a lot of hoopla in the off-season regarding the change in body types of some of the players, particularly Douglas, Fields and STAT. They all bulked up noticeably. If you’ve played ball, you know shooting is all about consistency in form. If your body type changes, your form has to adjust. You’re stronger, your arms weigh more, your vertical changes, etc. You see this a lot with high school and college players. As of now, none of them have their jumpers calibrated yet.

  8. Caleb

    The Honorable Cock Jowles: I never really understood how he had limited physical skills. He’s not Derrick Rose, but at 32, he shot .613 eFG.

    Age 32. Think about that. A 32-year-old 6’3? guard made 45.5% of his 3PA. And he’s at 43% for his career.

    How can anyone shoot 90 FT% for his career without an abundance of body control?

    Yeah, not buying the “limited” physical skills, at all. Maybe now, at age 37.

    Keys to longevity are being big (at least, for your position) and being able to shoot. Chauncey Billups is another good example. But Stevie’s taken it to another level.

  9. hoolahoop

    Die_Hard_Knick_Fan:
    @Ben R – I think it’s definitely a lack of ball movement and more importantly – way too many three pointers. Anthony and Stat look like they don’t like playing with each other and Chandler looks like he’s still trying to fit as a role player. I think Chandler just wants to do his part but is having a hard time finding that role with Stat and Anthony on the court at the same time. It seems like Stat and Anthony get the ball and feel like if they pass it they won’t get it back. When you look at the Heat and James and Wade, they seem like they enjoy playing with each other and will give up their stats for the better of the team. The Knicks don’t seem to have found that playing ground yet.

    Spot on.
    Ball movement breaks down when any one of the five players on the court stops playing within the system (see Melo-bury). Quickly, the new on-court mantra becomes “look to shoot the ball”. This disease is so insidious that even the mostly unlikely scorers, attempt to score before passing (see Yin, Balkman).
    The knicks are characterized by new era “star” ball. Melo-bury defines that role.
    Ironically, when Melo plays passing/winning basketball he looks beyond fantastic. If he defined himself with a passing/winning basketball style, I believe he would go down as one of the best basketball players of all time. However, I don’t think that is going to happen anytime, soon. That’s why Melo-bury will will never have the accolades that great players achieve. Expect him to leave the knicks at the end of his contract, never fulfilling the dreams he came to accomplish.

  10. hoolahoop

    The Honorable Cock Jowles: I never really understood how he had limited physical skills. He’s not Derrick Rose, but at 32, he shot .613 eFG.

    Age 32. Think about that. A 32-year-old 6’3? guard made 45.5% of his 3PA. And he’s at 43% for his career.

    How can anyone shoot 90 FT% for his career without an abundance of body control?

    I love Nash, and of course he’s a fantastic athlete. What I meant is that he does not have off-the-chart athletic ability – he doesn’t have a great vertical, twisting like a cat in mid air, a la jordon or kobe. He’s the best mental player of our era. . . more Bird-like (but a different game).

  11. hoolahoop

    Richmond County:
    There was a lot of hoopla in the off-season regarding the change in body types of some of the players, particularly Douglas, Fields and STAT.They all bulked up noticeably.If you’ve played ball, you know shooting is all about consistency in form.If your body type changes, your form has to adjust.You’re stronger, your arms weigh more, your vertical changes, etc.You see this a lot with high school and college players.As of now, none of them have their jumpers calibrated yet.

    Shhhhh. don’t say the word “steroids”
    dwayne wade

  12. ruruland

    hoolahoop: I love Nash, and of course he’s a fantastic athlete. What I meant is that he does not have off-the-chart athletic ability – he doesn’t have a great vertical, twisting like a cat in mid air, a la jordon or kobe. He’s the best mental player of our era. . . more Bird-like (but a different game).

    Vertical is probably one of the least valuable attributes for a pg to have. Nash has unbelievable eye-hand coordination, which is signficiantly more important than being loaded with quick-twitch muscle fiber.

  13. Bulleya1

    Pardon me if this has already been discussed but why havent the knicks looked into the signing of a gritty professional like Keith Bogans?
    If I’m not mistaken he started all 82 games for the Bulls last season and altho he may not be a scoring machine.. his man to man defense at the 2 guard position would probably be better than any player the knicks currently have.

    Just the random thoughts of a newcomer…

  14. Bulleya1

    Combine that with the possible release of bibby (which imo was a horrendous move to begin with) and attempt to sign eddie house. he would fit perfectly into d’antoni’s system and could provide a much needed offensive spark off the bench.

  15. Steve Carmichael (@Carmichael15) Post author

    Bulleya1: Pardon me if this has already been discussed but why havent the knicks looked into the signing of a gritty professional like Keith Bogans?If I’m not mistaken he started all 82 games for the Bulls last season and altho he may not be a scoring machine.. his man to man defense at the 2 guard position would probably be better than any player the knicks currently have. Just the random thoughts of a newcomer…

    People have brought this up before, and I’ve stated before that I would not flare my nostrils at Bogans. I don’t see any problem with adding more depth at the wing, also considering Bogans played for Tom Thibodeau who is arguably the best defensive coach in basketball.

  16. d-mar

    Hey K-bloggers, I’m a season ticket holder and I’m looking to sell tix to tonight’s game for face value if anyone’s interested. They’re a little pricey but very good seats.

    E-mail me at knickstickets2010@yahoo.com if interested. First come first served.

    PS This post has been cleared by Mike K. in case you’re wondering.

  17. hoolahoop

    ruruland: Vertical is probably one of the least valuable attributes for a pg to have. Nash has unbelievable eye-hand coordination, which is signficiantly more important than being loaded with quick-twitch muscle fiber.

    I agree with you.

  18. Die_Hard_Knick_Fan

    I would love to see the knicks spread the floor and try to get more passes into the 10-15 ft. range instead of everyone hanging out around the 3 point line waiting to take their shot. I’m sure that teams are paying attention and know by now all they have to do is clog up the middle with a zone defense and just let the Knicks throw up 3 after 3 until they eventually shoot themselves out of the game. They need to attack the middle and make the defense switch a few times and get disorganized. That won’t happen without quality ball movement though. And also to be fair to Melo; even if he wants to pass and get the team involved, he can’t do that until the other 4 players on the floor learn how to move without the ball. Set some screens, make some back door cuts, post some guys up. You don’t need to have the ball in your hands to play offense. I know that sounds elementary but still, the Knicks aren’t doing enough of the basics. They look like a playground team filled with some guys looking for a pickup game that know how to play together.

  19. Die_Hard_Knick_Fan

    Sorry, that last line should be a playground team that DOESN’T know how to play together.

  20. JK47

    I’m all for the Keith Bogans idea; I think he could do a better job in the Landry Fields role than Fields himself. Play tough perimeter D and knock down open jumpers when they’re available, that’s all you gotta do.

  21. hoolahoop

    Die_Hard_Knick_Fan: And also to be fair to Melo; even if he wants to pass and get the team involved, he can’t do that until the other 4 players on the floor learn how to move without the ball. Set some screens, make some back door cuts, post some guys up. You don’t need to have the ball in your hands to play offense. I know that sounds elementary but still, the Knicks aren’t doing enough of the basics. They look like a playground team filled with some guys looking for a pickup game that know how to play together.

    I agree with you, but the knicks won’t have player motion until Melo stops being a ball stopper.

  22. JK47

    @21

    You’re new here, but let me clue you in to something: everything is Melo’s fault. He’s the worst offensive player in the history of basketball and anathema to all things good and holy because all he does is stop the ball. Never mind that he leads the team in assists because SHUT UP THAT’S WHY.

  23. hoolahoop

    I hate to harp on the Melo problem, but it’s just so fundamental to playing winning basketball. Move the f**ken ball. Again, MOVE THE BALL instead of driving into the triple team and shooting! Some great scorers, like Iverson and Marbury, refuse to capitulate and create wars with their coaches, usually that get fired, and make themselves a lighting rod of love/hate.

  24. JK47

    @25

    That number is dragged down by his first few seasons, but he’s been reasonably efficient for a defensive-minded player over the past several seasons:

    2011 .559
    2010 .542
    2009 .521
    2008 .559
    2007 .546

  25. hoolahoop

    . . . loved by star gazing, fan boys of the new era.
    . . . and hated by knowledgeable basketball fans who want their team to play to it’s true potential.

  26. nicos

    Fields is missing wide open threes. He was never a quick release catch and shoot rhythm guy- he needs time to set his feet and he’s had plenty. And Fields isn’t exactly moving the ball quickly himself- more often than not, he catches the ball while open on the perimeter, makes a half-hearted pump fake, passes up the shot, takes two dribbles and then dumps the ball off. Douglas has always created a lot of his own opportunities on pull-up threes- and he’s bricking those. And now he’s suddenly turned into Chris Duhon- driving into the paint and continuing right on through and back out to the perimeter without ever looking to attack the basket with either a shot or an interior pass. Both of these guys are also very deliberate passers- very rare to see them make a quick touch pass, add to that the fact that Harrellson likes to take one dribble after the catch before he passes the ball and I’d say the perimeter guys aren’t exactly helping in the ball movement category.

  27. Z

    Richmond County:
    There was a lot of hoopla in the off-season regarding the change in body types of some of the players, particularly Douglas, Fields and STAT.They all bulked up noticeably.If you’ve played ball, you know shooting is all about consistency in form.If your body type changes, your form has to adjust.You’re stronger, your arms weigh more, your vertical changes, etc.You see this a lot with high school and college players.As of now, none of them have their jumpers calibrated yet.

    Interesting you should bring this up with Channing Frye coming to town tonight. He was the last casualty of the Knicks desire for “toughness”. They bragged that he put on 20 lbs of muscle the summer after his rookie year. When his sophomore season started his TS%, mysteriously, fell off a cliff. Like he didn’t know how to shoot anymore.

    Hmmm. Sound familiar?

  28. Juany8

    “Move the ball” sounds lovely when you see teams like the Celtics and the Spurs doing it, when they happen to have multiple great offensive weapons and role players who can hit open jumpers and make smart passes. When you have Landry Fields, Toney Douglas, and Iman Shumpert doing it well…. I seriously can’t believe how many times Melo has drawn a double team and passed it out to an open shooter only to see someone like Douglas pass up the open shot, do an incredibly obvious pump fake, then dribble once and either pull up for a jumper or wait 5 seconds for Melo or Stoudemire to come open so they can take a ridiculous shot. At some point Melo understandably begins to think, “is a fade away runner really a worse option than passing it to Landry Fields, who has no one within 5 ft of him?”

    Note, Kobe had the same mentality in 2006 when he had Kwame Brown and Smush Parker playing key roles on a playoff team. He was called a selfish ball hog who wouldn’t move the ball and made his teammates worse. Didn’t turn out too badly for him in the end huh?

  29. nicos

    Also, as someone who lives in Chicago and watched a fair amount of Bulls games last year I can say that Bogans’ defense wasn’t all that great last year (hence his limited minutes) but still a bit better than Fields. If Fields continues to miss threes and just as importantly repeatedly pass up good, open looks then he shouldn’t be playing- he’s second to only Jeremy Lin in turnover %! How is that possible when your role on offense is to be the shooter on kick-outs? He’s earned at least a few more weeks to get it together with his great season last year but picking up Bogans might not be a bad idea just in case.

  30. bobneptune

    The Honorable Cock Jowles: I never really understood how he had limited physical skills. He’s not Derrick Rose, but at 32, he shot .613 eFG.

    Age 32. Think about that. A 32-year-old 6’3? guard made 45.5% of his 3PA. And he’s at 43% for his career.

    How can anyone shoot 90 FT% for his career without an abundance of body control?

    hcj,

    it depends on how one defines physical skills. in terms of the nba one might reasonably define physical skills as explosion, lift, lateral foot speed/quickness… those sorts of metrics where nash is terribly lacking.

    on the other hand, he has a special skill set including wonderful hand/eye coordination and court vision (the ability to “see”/anticipate where everyone is going to be in the future).

    you are correct that you need physical skills to shoot the way nash does, but he is very lacking in some common skills that are pretty standard in the nba.

    another example would be the all time OTrg leader and 5 time nba champ steve kerr. a fantastic shooter when someone else can create the long shot for him, but pretty limited physically (by nba standards)

    if jordan and pippen or duncan, robinson, ginobli and parker are creating open looks for him he is a valuable complimentary player, but without those facilitators, he can’t get a shot and is valueless.

  31. Frank O.

    JK47:
    @21

    You’re new here, but let me clue you in to something: everything is Melo’s fault.He’s the worst offensive player in the history of basketball and anathema to all things good and holy because all he does is stop the ball.Never mind that he leads the team in assists because SHUT UP THAT’S WHY.

    Bitter? Lol

  32. nicos

    In terms of physical attributes Nash also has a relentless motor- great, soccer-style stamina that just wears other guards out.

  33. latke

    This is a pretty strong inditement of ball stopping: http://82games.com/dribbles.htm

    Look at the second chart — touches per second. Holding the ball is clearly murderous to a teams efficiency. I know the article is like five years old, but it should still apply.

  34. Frank O.

    hoolahoop:
    I hate to harp on the Melo problem, but it’s just so fundamental to playing winning basketball. Move the f**ken ball. Again, MOVE THE BALL instead of driving into the triple team and shooting! Some great scorers, like Iverson and Marbury, refuse to capitulate and create wars with their coaches, usually that get fired, and make themselves a lighting rod of love/hate.

    Look, I agree he stops the ball a bit. I agree he also could create real problems for the opposition when he does drive the paint if he could kick it out to an unguarded guy.
    But I think he’s got some trust issues right now, and I’m not sure they’re unjust at this point given how poorly TD, Fields, SHUMP, Bib, and Amare are shooting. I mean they have been putrid.
    Having said that, I watched two fourth periods in which the team’s scrubs shared the ball, created some shots and the offense appeared to flow.
    So, while I understand why Melo isn’t trusting his teammates in the second half…(he appears to pass well in the first half of games), I think his tendency to take over for better or worse hurts his teammates.
    The guys Around him seem out to sync.
    I also don’t understand D’Antoni’s distrust of Balkman, who has played pretty well.

  35. JK47

    I’d like to see more ball movement too, but the “Melo/ball-stopping” meme has become a very convenient knee-jerk excuse for everything that is wrong with the team.

    We have two guards, Douglas and Fields, who have fallen off the cliff, giving us almost no value. They’re both shooting under 25% from 3-point range. A very large number of those shots have been open shots. You get an open shot in the NBA, you need to make it, period. Yet we hear constant excuses about the “ball-stopping” causing the guards to get the ball “out of rhythm.” It’s a bit of a stretch, really. How bad does the “rhythm” have to be to cause someone to shoot 21% from 3? It would have to be Meg White-level bad.

  36. Ben R

    We talk about how our guards are struggling but we stopped moving the ball halfway into our first game. Our guards never had a chance to shoot themselves out of their slumps. Now after one bad shot Fields or Douglas or Walker get frozen out and might not touch the ball on the offensive side of the court for 3-4-5 possessions. This gets in a players head. They start playing tight knowing that every shot might be their last, combine that with D’Antoni’s quicker than usual hook and a player like Fields or Douglas are so in their own heads right now it is no wonder they are thinking out there and passing up shots.

    It all starts with ball stopping. it is a disease that spreads through an offense. Guards like Shumpert or Douglas don’t know when to shoot so they either completely shut down and just hand the ball to Melo or Amare or they jack up terrible too soon in the shot clock jumpers off the dribble. Wings like Fields and Walker start passing up open jumpers. There is no continuity out there.

    A good shot is a good shot even if it misses and a bad shot is a bad shot even if it goes in. Our offense lacks discipline, patience and trust. It is not all Melo’s fault but he is part of the problem and until he becomes part of the solution we will never click.

  37. MSA

    Douglas FGA per 36:
    2009-10 – 12,9
    2010-11 – 13,8
    2011-12 – 16,8

    Fields FGA per 36
    2010-11 – 8,5
    2011-12 – 8,1

    Sure, there is a lot of ball stopping but is not like this guys don’t have more opportunities then in the past.

  38. JK47

    @40

    Toney Douglas has missed an awful lot of “good shots.” He’s missed open 15-footers, open 3-pointers, open 8-footers– you name it, he’s missed it. He’s certainly been one of the very worst players in the NBA this season who has gotten meaningful minutes. TS% of .404, eFG% of .376 with a high usage number of 25.2%. It’s not like he’s not getting opportunities– he’s third on the team in FGA despite his abysmal play.

    If he’s so much of a fragile flower that he can’t knock down WIDE open shots because Melo held the ball a few seconds too long, then he doesn’t belong in the NBA.

  39. Ben R

    MSA:
    Douglas FGA per 36:
    2009-10 – 12,9
    2010-11 – 13,8
    2011-12 – 16,8

    Fields FGA per 36
    2010-11 – 8,5
    2011-12 – 8,1

    Sure, there is a lot of ball stopping but is not like this guys don’t have more opportunities then in the past.

    Yes but they are getting their shots outside of the flow of the offense rather than in the flow. Many of the shots look forced and are not as good of shots as they were last year.

  40. daJudge

    I don’t get the logic here at all. Melo is a scoring small forward. He is the best scorer on the team. He commands doubles at times, or at least warrants a great deal of attention. Douglas and Fields, this year, have not cashed in on these opportunities. It’s their bad. Sure, if Melo was Larry Bird, perhaps they would get even more open looks. But you know what, statistically speaking, they would probably brick those shots as well. Do you think Bird would keep passing to them? Lookit, they are both NBA shooting guards. As far as I can tell, Melo hasn’t used his well documented (here) evil telepathic power to negate their ability to shoot the damn ball with some modicum of success. He has not put a spell on them. There is no spooky action at work here and it is not really complicated. IMO, their shots will come around and if not, they can’t be shooting guards in the NBA on any team.

  41. art vandelay

    A major problem Fields and Douglas have, particularly, and that impedes our ability to effectively move the ball around and especially get into the paint with dribble penetration is that they simply don´t hang onto the dribble long enough…they are both highly prone to pick up their dribble very early in shot clock…as someone said above, Fields makes a useless pump fake, moves laterally, almost never attacks and after a dribble or two, attempts to hand the ball off to melo in traffic…in fact, how often has our offense boiled down to what appears to be a weave 5 feet beyond the three point line that ultimately results in Fields or Douglas stopping the dribble and forcing a ball to Melo with shotclock running down…highly frustrating.

  42. Ben R

    Art – I have seen that but much more often Ive seen Melo call for the ball 20 feet away from the basket hold it for 5,6,10 seconds and then finally make a move. Sometimes that move results in a nice pass or a nice shot sometimes a forced shot but it always forces everyone else on the Knicks to stand around.

    Melo is by no means the only person at fault on the Knicks but to say he is beyond reproach and it is all his lousey teamates fault is wrong. Fields, Douglas, Shumpert, Walker, Amare they are all to blame for their own poor shooting but don’t you think it’s strange that all of them are shooting career worst numbers. Either almost every single Knick forgot how to shoot or there is a bigger problem at play.

  43. daJudge

    Ben R, of course no one is beyond reproach. Melo has issues. I totally agree. The flaw in your logic is the ascription of causation. There are a many possible reasons why the Knicks are shooting poorly. Also, when you say “career”, Fields is in his second year. Amare is clearly not playing well on multiple levels. I would hope that he would never blame Melo for his problems. I don’t know about TD, but he looks hurt. Come on now, Shumpert is a rook. Walker is a streak shooter.

  44. Brian Cronin (@Brian_Cronin)

    Ben R, of course no one is beyond reproach. Melo has issues. I totally agree. The flaw in your logic is the ascription of causation.

    Melo has for years been the beneficiary of iffy causation (“Melo is a winner because Denver has always had a winning record since he got there.”), so there’s a certain justice to see the iffy causation go against him this year.

    But yeah, I agree that it is not fair to blame Melo for Douglas or Walker shooting like crap or Fields bricking threes.

  45. Ben R

    daJudge: The flaw in your logic is the ascription of causation. There are a many possible reasons why the Knicks are shooting poorly.

    You’re right, it is not Melo’s fault for our shooting woes that was a bit of a stretch, but people are trying to blame Amare’s woes on TD and Shumpert and Fields and that is just as unfair. We have problems everywhere I just think that Melo is more part of the problem than the solution with his ball stopping, and people are trying to act like Melo’s play thus far has been fine when it really hasn’t. Nothing is really working offensively and all I’m trying to do is point out that Melo’s play has been a problem just like Fields, Douglas, Shumpert and Amare.

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